Modi Sarkaar 2.0, Indian politics, Economy, Security and Foreign Policy

mayfair

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Then one has to wait till sufficient progress in Technology has been made before defence expenditure is raised.

No, defence R&D is nit necessarily the furst expense to be axed in downturn. China face famines in 1962 and then cultural revolution in 1970. None if that stopped China from developing missile, nuclear bomb or other Technology.
Big difference is we are not China for many reasons

1. We did not have Soviets transfer the nuke designs to their communist ally as a bulwark against possible republican re-takeover.

2. The same Soviets happily transferred preliminary missile designs and jet aircaft assemby lines to PRC (F-7 a clone of Mig-21), thinking the latter would be indebted forever.

3. Sino-Soviet split in 1969, allowed the West to step in and they took over where the Soviets left. They decided that Cheen should be propped up as a bulwark against Soviet Marxist-Lenninist worldview and they happily supplied Cheen with rockets, technology and space tech. However, it was not until 1996 that their Long March series of rockets became reliable after haramkhor laundibaaz Clinton signed wavers upon wavers allowing the transfer of sensitive tech to Cheen despite reservations and opposition from his security and intelligence apparatus.

4. Mao send 30 million of his people to death, do you think he cared if there was resentment due to famine and shortage of food?

5. CCP does not have worry about elections, about votes, about what people think. However, I'll still be very interested to see stats that show how much Cheen spend on R&D in those famine years.

6. Soviets focussed almost entirely on military and associated R&D. Didn't help them much in 1991 did it?

In every open and democratic society, R&D investment is the first to see the axe when economic hardships come calling- we saw in the US after the second Iraq war, Western Erope has seen some of the sharpest decline in research funding in the past decade. In Japan, funding has stagnated and it's beginning to plateau in Korea as well. Other examples include Canada, Australia etc.
 

Vijyes

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Big difference is we are not China for many reasons

1. We did not have Soviets transfer the nuke designs to their communist ally as a bulwark against possible republican re-takeover.

2. The same Soviets happily transferred preliminary missile designs and jet aircaft assemby lines to PRC (F-7 a clone of Mig-21), thinking the latter would be indebted forever.

3. Sino-Soviet split in 1969, allowed the West to step in and they took over where the Soviets left. They decided that Cheen should be propped up as a bulwark against Soviet Marxist-Lenninist worldview and they happily supplied Cheen with rockets, technology and space tech. However, it was not until 1996 that their Long March series of rockets became reliable after haramkhor laundibaaz Clinton signed wavers upon wavers allowing the transfer of sensitive tech to Cheen despite reservations and opposition from his security and intelligence apparatus.

4. Mao send 30 million of his people to death, do you think he cared if there was resentment due to famine and shortage of food?

5. CCP does not have worry about elections, about votes, about what people think. However, I'll still be very interested to see stats that show how much Cheen spend on R&D in those famine years.

6. Soviets focussed almost entirely on military and associated R&D. Didn't help them much in 1991 did it?

In every open and democratic society, R&D investment is the first to see the axe when economic hardships come calling- we saw in the US after the second Iraq war, Western Erope has seen some of the sharpest decline in research funding in the past decade. In Japan, funding has stagnated and it's beginning to plateau in Korea as well. Other examples include Canada, Australia etc.
Japan & korea are USA vassals. Calling them democracy is absurd.

Secondly, USSR gave full Technology transfer to India fir Mig21 and gave lot if Technology for civilian sector. China did not get all Technology from USSR either. China developed its own missile and space launch vehicle with some reverse engineering of USSR ones. China made its own nuclear submarine, not from USSR help. USA hardly have any technology to China in any manner. China were pretentions their icbm for some time since they made it in 1960s. Saying that usa have Technology is highly absurd. China and USA has pretty bad relationship after tianamen incident which China blamed USA for sponsoring it. So, China developed and completed their missile as they advanced in semiconductor and cool make reliable navigation

Whether India is China or not is irrelevant. Whether India is government by ideology it not is more relevant. People are willing to sacrifice themselves for greater good as long as a country is ideologically government. If China was as reckless as you state, USA would have intervened and got Mao overthrown by supporting rebellion. It was the Chinese themselves who accepted the capability limits and sided with Mao despite famines. Mao did not kill 2-3 crore people by ordering execution. He just could not stop famines from killing people as none were willing to give food to China and China simply did not have enough food for itself

So, again, R&D will not be cut during downturn unless the Technology has peaked or the government is filled with traitors. Europe or USA did nit cut down on defence R&D ever and only cut down unnecessary R&D in non critical areas
 

Rxbanda

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Here is a quick look at the highlights of the Narendra Modi government’s second tenure after it was voted back to power on 23 May, 2019, with an even bigger majority than in 2014. Let us see what worked and what didn’t.

1. Scrapping of Article 370

Not many Indians believed India’s first prime minister Jawaharlal Nehru’s blunder in granting Kashmir special status — a move that strengthened and provided a legal bedrock for separatism and insurgency — would be reversed in their lifetime. This was the BJP government’s finest moment. In one masterstroke, Kashmir was fully legally and administratively integrated with the rest of the country.

It was also the first time India struck back with force in the losing, 1,000-year demographic war which has continually disembodied and shrunk it.

2. Banning instant talaq

This was a much-needed corrective step which freed Muslim women from being thrown out of marriage at just a patriarchal whim. Decades-old perverted secularism stopped governments from banning the practice in the guise of Muslim personal law.

The step also paves the way for a Uniform Civil Code. The case against polygamy and multiple marriages are already in court.

3. Stronger anti-terror law

In August, Rajya Sabha passed amendments to the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, making it easier and speedier to act against terror. Most importantly, it now allows India to designate individuals as terrorists, as is the norm in most nations.

4. Economy in a tailspin

Economy remains the one overriding worry for Modi Sarkar 2.0. It started slipping from last year.

The government had two budgets, one interim and one full, to fix things. Finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman increased the surcharge on Income Tax for both domestic and foreign portfolio investors that sent the markets tumbling. A month later in August, she hurriedly rolled it back. But the damage to investor sentiment was done.

This year, the government again lost the moment to reset the economy. Instead of easing tax, the government introduced six slabs within an annual income of Rs 15 lakh.

There was little for the middle and the salaried class, who have endured the twin shocks of demonetisation and Goods and Services Tax and whose consumption and spending form the edifice of the India growth story.

Only last month crude prices were negative. But the government, instead of passing on the benefit to consumers, raised duties on diesel by Rs 13 a litre and on petrol by Rs 10 litre.

5. The disinvestment chimera


The government has promised to privatise Air India, which has accumulated losses of more than Rs 60,000 crore. There has also been much talk of disinvestment from the Life Insurance Corporation. But not much has moved.

The finance minister has recently announced a new public sector policy which will list out strategic sectors requiring presence of public sector enterprises (PSE) in public interest. In other sectors, PSEs will be privatized, and the number of enterprises in strategic sectors will ordinarily be only one to four.

Air India falls into the previous category, and being the only one of its kind, it may well mean that the Maharaja’s privatization plan, which has failed to take off last year, may be aborted for the time being.

6. Merger of PSU banks

One bold economic step of this NDA tenure was the merger of 10 public sector banks into four big banks. This facilitates consolidation, makes the banks stronger and more competitive. It also leads to rationalisation of manpower and resources and avoids overlap of branches across India, thus cutting down on running costs.

7. Blood and citizenship

The government took another civilisational step by fast-tracking the citizenship process for six persecuted minorities from Muslim-majority Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan under the Citizenship Amendment Act. Muslims from these countries can still apply for Indian citizenship, but not under this narrow-window legislation.

Nationwide protests and violence erupted from Murshidabad in Bengal to Jamia in Delhi. It ultimately led to the Delhi riots in which more than 50 Hindus and Muslims were killed.

8. At Ram’s doorstep at last

While the Supreme Court finally delivered its judgment which favoured building a temple in Lord Ram’s birth site in Ayodhya where the Babri Masjid once stood before it was demolished, it culminated the ruling BJP’s decades-long activism.

The government has set up an independent trust to build the temple there. A battle fought through a mass movement, won in the court.

9. Containing corona catastrophe

It is now quite clear that purely in terms of containment, India has done a stellar job when dozens of developed nations have got knocked out. In spite of its 130 crore population and rudimentary healthcare, both the government and citizens responded quickly and spiritedly.

In this crisis, India has helped the world with hydroxychloroquine, and built its own medical capacities (created thousands of new beds for patients, and started producing masks, protective equipment and sanitisers at a mass scale).

States like Uttar Pradesh, Haryana and Telangana have aggressively started pitching for businesses and manufacturing which are exiting China.

10. Long road to COVID-19 relief

While the government has rolled out a set of worthwhile reform measures like amending the Essential Commodities Act and giving a strong push to Make in India, its relief package for migrant workers seem to be a jugglery of already announced schemes.

The distressed workers need immediate relief. Some of them are walking hundreds of kilometres home with their families. They need cash in hand. The direct benefit transfers done so far are falling short.

Having insufficient data on migrant workers cannot be an excuse. Each day the government is getting data from the Shramik Special trains it is running.

In many ways, the spectacular first year of Modi Sarkar 2.0 shouldn’t have had the blood, sweat and tears of the most vulnerable people it is meant to serve. And if it showed economic imagination to match its clockwork political instincts.
 

Rxbanda

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My opinion as a common man :

Positives-
1) Article 370 scrapping. First step for achieving peaceful, stable J&K in long run.
2) Triple Talaq. Good for muslim women.
3) Corporate tax reduction
4) Ram Mandir
5) Initial handling of COVID19. A huge market for PPE and COVID19 test kits production.

Negatives:
1) Economy down
2) high umemployment
3) Couldn't control the increasing cultural clashes. Couldn't control Delhi riots.
4) Handling of migrant workers during lockdown
5) Expected more relief on the demand side.

Expectations:
1) Improve economy
2) Population control bill
3) Improve the malnutrition problem
4) Get all the fugitives to pay back their loans
5) Create more jobs.
 

A chauhan

"अहिंसा परमो धर्मः धर्म हिंसा तथैव च: l"
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My opinion as a common man :

Positives-
1) Article 370 scrapping. First step for achieving peaceful, stable J&K in long run.
2) Triple Talaq. Good for muslim women.
3) Corporate tax reduction
4) Ram Mandir
5) Initial handling of COVID19. A huge market for PPE and COVID19 test kits production.

Negatives:
1) Economy down
2) high umemployment
3) Couldn't control the increasing cultural clashes. Couldn't control Delhi riots.
4) Handling of migrant workers during lockdown
5) Expected more relief on the demand side.

Expectations:
1) Improve economy
2) Population control bill
3) Improve the malnutrition problem
4) Get all the fugitives to pay back their loans
5) Create more jobs.
Most important expectation from Modi is to break Leftist+casteist nexus e.g. Jai Bheem Jai Meem.
 
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First year of Modi 2.0 was all about cultural reclamation, the second year will be all about economic reset

India has come a long way since the re-election of the Modi government, 2019 General Elections, Article 370 of the Constitution has been abrogated, the long-pending Union Territory status demand of the people of Ladakh has been fulfilled, CAA has been enacted to accommodate the victims of the 1947 Partition, the Bodo issue in Assam has come to an end and the 150-year old Ayodhya dispute has been resolved.
The first year of the Modi government was more about cultural reclamation, and solving old problems that were several decades old. With the nation united and well-integrated, India is now pushing its way towards economic prosperity and with a wave of economic reforms, it is now clear that the second year of Modi government focus on economics. The Coronavirus Pandemic too has turned out to be just the crisis that stimulate bold economic reforms.
The context of Modi government’s first year in power was to fulfil long-pending demands which had propelled the BJP to prominence and power. And the ruling BJP has delivered extra-ordinarily on this front.
One may argue that the Ayodhya verdict was a Supreme Court ruling and not executive action, but we cannot lose sight of the fact that it was years of BJP-led activism that brought the Ram Janambhoomi dispute close to resolution.
But the context of 2020, in India, like any other part of the world is the COVID-19 outbreak, lockdowns and an economic downturn. India isn’t immune from the global economic slowdown and the GDP growth forecasts for the current fiscal are rather bleak.
But India sits in a peculiar position, as the country which is expected to replace China as the global manufacturing hub in a post-Coronavirus world. India has taken note and has kickstarted some big-bang economic reforms, some of them probably as big as the 1991 economic reforms. This means that cultural reclamation takes a backseat for the time being.
In his speech announcing a massive Rs. 20 lakh crore economic package, PM Modi had hinted at reforms.
He had explicitly mentioned Land, Labour, Liquidity and Laws as part of the reforms agenda. The ruling BJP has moved ahead on all these fronts.
BJP states like Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka, Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh have relaxed labour and land norms in a massive attempt to woo foreign companies exiting China.
At the Central level, Union Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman has announced massive reforms. The government announced a package of 6 lakh crore rupees, with government-backed MSME loans without collateral alone accounting for 3 lakh crore rupees. Previously, RBI had announced various liquidity measures of more than 6 lakh crores. Out of financial package worth 20 lakh crores, more than half is focused on liquidity.
One of the boldest reforms have been initiated in the Agricultural sector, which is getting deregulated for the first time. Enactments like the Essential Commodities Act and the pari materia legislations called the Agricultural Produce Market Committee (APMC) Act across several states have been watered down by the Modi government and BJP-ruled states respectively.
Both these legislations controlled the demand and supply side of the agricultural sector, strongly regulating farm storage, supplies and prices. But this edifice is getting dismantled to ensure that the farmer gets the highest possible value for his produce.
At the Central level, Finance Minister Nirmala Sithraman has given the biggest push to privatisation since the 1991 reforms. Accordingly, the Centre has announced that non-strategic Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs) will be privatised, and the role of the PSUs will be restricted to non-strategic sectors. Even in the strategic sectors, there will be at least one but not more than four PSUs.
Pushing economic reforms could have never been as easy as cultural reclamation because the fact remains that there is a huge Political Socialism establishment in India which goes all out to oppose such economic reforms. Therefore, you invariably need a crisis that leaves you with no option but to push economic reforms.
The Balance of Payment crisis in 1991 allowed then Prime Minister Narasimha Rao to unveil economic reforms, and the COVID-19 crisis in 2020 has allowed PM Modi to initiate big bang economic reforms. Eyeing an opportunity to make India the ‘world’s new factory’, PM Modi is not letting this crisis go wasted, and therefore the second year of Modi government is going to be all about economics.
 

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