ISRO News and Updates

Karthi

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“Chandrayaan 2’s Rover Intact On Moon”: Techie Who Spotted Vikram Lander.

Chennai-based engineer Shanmuga Subramanian, who was credited by NASA last year for spotting the debris of the lander of Chandrayaan 2, has come up with a new find. The 33-year-old techie has claimed to have spotted Chandrayaan 2’s rover – Pragyan – which seemed to be “intact” on the moon’s surface.

In a series of tweets along with a picture taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital (LRO), Mr Subramanian claimed that the rover had “rolled out a few metres from the skeleton Vikram lander.” Chandrayaan2’s Pragyan “ROVER” intact on Moon’s surface & has rolled out few metres from the skeleton Vikram lander whose payloads got disintegrated due to rough landing. The space enthusiast also said that the lander may have received the commands sent to it from earth and also might have relayed it to the rover. However, it may have failed to communicate back to earth.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) had lost contact with the lander Vikram following its launch from Chandrayaan 2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make soft-landing near the moon’s south pole. Mr Subramanian has also mailed ISRO about his latest find, a screenshot of which he shared on Twitter. India had expected to make space history with the Rs. 1,000 crore Chandrayaan 2 mission. A successful soft landing on the moon’s surface would have made the country only the fourth – after the United States, Russia and China – to achieve the feat. It would also have made India the first country to complete a soft landing near the South Pole on its first attempt.
 

FalconZero

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View attachment 55228View attachment 55229View attachment 55231

“Chandrayaan 2’s Rover Intact On Moon”: Techie Who Spotted Vikram Lander.

Chennai-based engineer Shanmuga Subramanian, who was credited by NASA last year for spotting the debris of the lander of Chandrayaan 2, has come up with a new find. The 33-year-old techie has claimed to have spotted Chandrayaan 2’s rover – Pragyan – which seemed to be “intact” on the moon’s surface.

In a series of tweets along with a picture taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital (LRO), Mr Subramanian claimed that the rover had “rolled out a few metres from the skeleton Vikram lander.” Chandrayaan2’s Pragyan “ROVER” intact on Moon’s surface & has rolled out few metres from the skeleton Vikram lander whose payloads got disintegrated due to rough landing. The space enthusiast also said that the lander may have received the commands sent to it from earth and also might have relayed it to the rover. However, it may have failed to communicate back to earth.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) had lost contact with the lander Vikram following its launch from Chandrayaan 2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make soft-landing near the moon’s south pole. Mr Subramanian has also mailed ISRO about his latest find, a screenshot of which he shared on Twitter. India had expected to make space history with the Rs. 1,000 crore Chandrayaan 2 mission. A successful soft landing on the moon’s surface would have made the country only the fourth – after the United States, Russia and China – to achieve the feat. It would also have made India the first country to complete a soft landing near the South Pole on its first attempt.

Also, he did mention that antenna probably got separated, so is there any other way to relay the information? I so wish that he is right.
 

scatterStorm

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Let us complete the Gaganyan & Chandrayan mission successfully first. Then we should talk about the next step of landing on moon. We were unable to land a probe on moon till now and you are talking of human landing there.

Chinese on their part is sending a probe to mars after even failing to insert a orbiter in its orbit. So if you want to match their monkey trick of ego satisfaction, then its other matter. But I am happy with the systematic approach of ISRO in this regard.
Chinese are not sending a probe, they are sending a geosynchronous sat, a landing platform and a rover. They already reached moon. They didn't needed help, we on the other hand required NASA's trajectory data to reach MARS. The information is in public domain.

They ain't doing monkey trick, they are just more focused. Yes I do have to say that funding is given to them by the CCP in large numbers. That's there advantage. Meanwhile ISROs rover didn't land correctly because of various reasons, one of the major one being not able to calculate properly the reentry of a moon lander. I assume there calculations were in regards to earth's atmosphere, and the other being not able to use better sensor suite and optical location mapping which the Chinese did. I think @Karthi could put some more light into this.

👉 If ISRO really want to make big news, they should stat there ATV project for reusable rockets. Because this is the only thing which will place them near SpaceX and Blueorigin. If they did it, they will become the first country in Asia to do this. The second nation to do this.

This will be a small win but a major one, imagine they can cut cost of building more rockets, this will give rise to more mission and will inch us closer to moon in Just within a year or two.
 

mokoman

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Why are we relying on NASA LRO images ?

Isn't Chandrayaan's orbiter images higher resolution ?

It would have done several passes over landing site.
 

no smoking

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Meanwhile ISROs rover didn't land correctly because of various reasons, one of the major one being not able to calculate properly the reentry of a moon lander. I assume there calculations were in regards to earth's atmosphere, and the other being not able to use better sensor suite and optical location mapping which the Chinese did. I think @Karthi could put some more light into this.
No, even high schoolboys won't make that mistake (using earth's atmosphere as reference).
The main reason is: India's moon lander was using 5 small liquid throttleable engines (800kn) to control its descent while other 3 nations only used 1 engine (>7500kn). So, instead of only controlling the the fuel flow to change the thrust to adjust the dropping speed, India's moon lander also has to do the same thing by switch on and off the number of engines, which in turn significantly increase the complexity and risk.
 

scatterStorm

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No, even high schoolboys won't make that mistake (using earth's atmosphere as reference).
The main reason is: India's moon lander was using 5 small liquid throttleable engines (800kn) to control its descent while other 3 nations only used 1 engine (>7500kn). So, instead of only controlling the the fuel flow to change the thrust to adjust the dropping speed, India's moon lander also has to do the same thing by switch on and off the number of engines, which in turn significantly increase the complexity and risk.
Agreed, having more engines means more directional vectors to compute. How about 3d mapping the surface with LIDAR ... a startup is using this and was selected by NASA for there human mission landing.
 

Chinmoy

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Chinese are not sending a probe, they are sending a geosynchronous sat, a landing platform and a rover. They already reached moon. They didn't needed help, we on the other hand required NASA's trajectory data to reach MARS. The information is in public domain.

They ain't doing monkey trick, they are just more focused. Yes I do have to say that funding is given to them by the CCP in large numbers. That's there advantage. Meanwhile ISROs rover didn't land correctly because of various reasons, one of the major one being not able to calculate properly the reentry of a moon lander. I assume there calculations were in regards to earth's atmosphere, and the other being not able to use better sensor suite and optical location mapping which the Chinese did. I think @Karthi could put some more light into this.

👉 If ISRO really want to make big news, they should stat there ATV project for reusable rockets. Because this is the only thing which will place them near SpaceX and Blueorigin. If they did it, they will become the first country in Asia to do this. The second nation to do this.

This will be a small win but a major one, imagine they can cut cost of building more rockets, this will give rise to more mission and will inch us closer to moon in Just within a year or two.
So as you mentioned again, we have to work on basics first. From your original quote,

ISRO on the other hand, let’s launch more PSLVs. Let’s go to Venus in 2023, why shouldn’t you start with landing on moon first. The countries first to reach there will serve for fuel stations for spaceships in future.
against this underlined part I quoted that lets first complete our Chandrayaan 3 and Gaganyaan successfully. These would be our stepping stone for any further deep space exploration. As far as launching PSLV is concerned, that's our need and bread & butter. We can't leave it for anything else.

As far as Chinese are concerned, I'd stand by my words that they are doing monkey tricks. They are trying to compete with NASA head on, same as what USSR tried to do. As for us, we should have our basics right. Instead of taking on some over ambitious projects just to beat Chinese, we should have a more ractical approach.

As you already mentioned, we can't afford to put money like US and China on our space programs as of now. So a budgetary practical approach is what we need at this time and thankfully ISRO is doing exactly that at the moment.
 

no smoking

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As far as Chinese are concerned, I'd stand by my words that they are doing monkey tricks. They are trying to compete with NASA head on, same as what USSR tried to do.
Really? Any people with right mind won't even think there is a race here, at least Chinese doesn't look that way.
How many Mars landers did American put on that planet? 5!
How many Mars landers did Chinese put there? 0!
If there is a race as someone suggest, US already finish the match before Chinese gets to the start line.
 

Karthi

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PS 4 will get solar panels for power and will add navigation systems to communicate with ground controls. ISRO doing lot of experiments with PS4, it will be provided with autonomous capabilities to do experiments. PS4 will get robotic arms for various experiments and debris collection. and will get capabilities like imaging of earth . Will do for experiments for MPP from colleges. It will turn into a platform for anybody who interested in conducting experiments without building a satellite. Nobody in the world has ever done this kind of Low cost expirment platform .
 

Varun2002

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Nice developments from the private sector... now still eagerly awaiting good news about GISAT-1, SSLV-D1, RLV-D2 and PSLV launches as well.
 

Karthi

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Space bricks for lunar habitation

In what could be a significant step forward in space exploration, a team of researchers from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has developed a sustainable process for making brick-like structures on the moon. It exploits lunar soil, and uses bacteria and guar beans to consolidate the soil into possible load-bearing structures. These “space bricks” could eventually be used to assemble structures for habitation on the moon’s surface, the researchers suggest.
“It is really exciting because it brings two different fields — biology and mechanical engineering — together,” says Aloke Kumar, Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, IISc, one of the authors of two studies recently published in Ceramics International and PLOS One.
Space exploration has grown exponentially in the last century. With Earth's resources dwindling rapidly, scientists have only intensified their efforts to inhabit the moon and possibly other planets.

The cost of sending one pound of material to outer space is about Rs. 7.5 lakh. The process developed by the IISc and ISRO team uses urea — which can be sourced from human urine — and lunar soil as raw materials for construction on the moon's surface. This decreases the overall expenditure considerably. The process also has a lower carbon footprint because it uses guar gum instead of cement for support. This could also be exploited to make sustainable bricks on Earth.
Some micro-organisms can produce minerals through metabolic pathways. One such bacterium, called Sporosarcina pasteurii, produces calcium carbonate crystals through a metabolic pathway called the ureolytic cycle: it uses urea and calcium to form these crystals as byproducts of the pathway. “Living organisms have been involved in such mineral precipitation since the dawn of the Cambrian period, and modern science has now found a use for them,” says Kumar.
To exploit this ability, Kumar and colleagues at IISc teamed up with ISRO scientists Arjun Dey and I Venugopal. They first mixed the bacteria with a simulant of lunar soil. Then, they added the required urea and calcium sources along with gum extracted from locally-sourced guar beans. The guar gum was added to increase the strength of the material by serving as a scaffold for carbonate precipitation. The final product obtained after a few days of incubation was found to possess significant strength and machinability.
“Our material could be fabricated into any freeform shape using a simple lathe. This is advantageous because this completely circumvents the need for specialised moulds – a common problem when trying to make a variety of shapes by casting. This capability could also be exploited to make intricate interlocking structures for construction on the moon, without the need for additional fastening mechanisms,” explains Koushik Viswanathan, Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, IISc, another author.
The PLOS One study, conceived by Rashmi Dikshit, a DBT-BioCARe Fellow at IISc, also investigated the use of other locally available soil bacteria in the place of S. pasteurii. After testing different soil samples in Bangalore, the researchers found an ideal candidate with similar properties: Bacillus velezensis. Just a vial of S. pasteurii can cost Rs. 50,000; B. velezensis, on the other hand, is about ten times less expensive, the researchers say.
The authors believe that this is the first significant step towards constructing buildings in space. “We have quite a distance to go before we look at extra-terrestrial habitats. Our next step is to make larger bricks with a more automated and parallel production process,” says Kumar. “Simultaneously, we would also like to further enhance the strength of these bricks and test them under varied loading conditions like impacts and possibly moonquakes.”

Courtesy :- Tarmak 007
 

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