ISRO News and Updates

rishivashista13

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Not very high anymore. Enough proof that it's being address. Even world bank's nominal poverty ratio has declined from 21.9% to 16.2%. Just 7.8% in PPP. A heavy fall in hunger index too (ask for reports but on related threads).
Well for your point:

Completely wrong. Extra terrestrial missions are useless and just for pride. But manned mission always leads to creation of critical technologies, specially for medical.
Just for example, ISRO's body warmer gel is useful for cold areas like Siachen. Life Support Systems are underway testing for manned mission as well as medical purposes. I can list up a lot.

AFA, BBC and Al Jazeera are concerned, when India ranks 25th worldwide in global pension systems (ahead of many high income economies), these morons say that India ranks last among top 25; shameful.

What you do expect from them?:pound:
I don't think ISRO has done any mission which was useless and just for pride .
Every mission helps us to develop and test some critical technology . Till now every mission is a step forward and useful .

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indiatester

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Thats a logical question that would arise since India has not succeed socioeconomically.

There is a global support for Indian Space program since it earns revenues for the government but that support would die out if India pursues a manned space program.

India is plagued with chronic hunger,mass unemployment and bad infrastructure which need to be addressed on an urgent basis.
This is one point I never understood. We sure had a lot of people who did not have access to food in the 1980's but is that still a problem now? IMO most of the problem we face are because of a difference in diet which gets measured as stunted growth in most surveys rather than lack of food.
Yes there are some pockets of tribal areas and sections in drought hit areas that suffer from this, but painting India itself as having chronic hunger is stretching it far.
Try to remember when was the last time you saw beggars at your doorstep asking for food.

I think we must take this discussion out of ISRO section.
@sayareakd can you help?
 
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ISRO has plans to go small with lighter satellites

M. Annadurai
Plan is two-pronged and satellites can range from 10 kg ‘micros’ to 300 kg-500 kg ‘minis’

Even as it moves into making heavier communication spacecraft weighing 4,000 kg to 6,000 kg, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has also firmed up a strategy to a make increasingly smaller satellites for earth observation and scientific, experimental and other missions.
The plan for small satellites is two-pronged and can range from 10 kg ‘micros’ to 300 kg-500 kg ‘minis’. A series of 350-kg ‘mini’ satellites, probably with high resolution cameras and innovative features, will be built in the near future for the ISRO’s own remote-sensing uses.
They will be built on the decade-old IMS-2 platform on which the ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC) has earlier brought out half a dozen EO (earth observation) satellites.
Nano satellites
It also plans to build 10 kg or smaller nano and micro satellites using a 100 kg IMS-1 platform. This will offer ready and reliable micro and nano satellite ‘shells’ on which the Indian Institutes of Technology, universities and even start-ups can put their experimental payloads or devices.
Saving time
The idea is to encourage users to save time to import a suitable small satellite and instead focus on test novel concepts on the satellites. IMS stands for 80 kg Indian Mini Satellite, launched in 2008.
The 300 kg - 400 kg class may be the new norm in Indian EO. “In future, we may put three EO satellites, each with a mass not more than 350 kg, at a time on a PSLV. They will be for remote sensing, weather or science missions,” ISAC director M. Annadurai told The Hindu. Such a plan, he said, would also need fewer launch vehicles, efforts and time.
Dr. Annadurai said that going small was in tune with the global trend and “a logical extension of what we were already doing a decade ago.”
The ISRO’s own remote-sensing satellites, he said, had been getting progressively smaller, from close to 1,000 kg to the recent 370-kg Scatsat-1 to monitor ocean weather.
Considering the growing interest among universities and start-ups to use sub-100 kg satellites as test beds, the ISAC can readily provide them the basic spacecraft using a “two-stack” configuration somewhat off the shelf. The user can later add a payload or application of 5 kg on to this. Today, university satellites take three years to materialise and involve students from two or three batches.
Continuity
This affects continuity, quality and interest levels in the teams and risk producing “me-too” satellites with no new ideas. “We want to bridge these gaps,” he said.
Dr. Annadurai said that student satellite projects come up with interesting and relevant experiments and need to be encouraged. One such corelates ionospheric phenomena with impending earthquakes. To lessen debris they could be made to decay faster by putting them at lower 450 km orbits, among others.
The ISRO, too, used small satellites to test its concepts. IMS-1 was the test bed for elements that went into Chandrayaan-1 of 2008.
The Indo-Russian Youthsat of 2011 experimented with spacecraft autonomy that was the hallmark of the 2014 Mars Orbiter Mission and future planetary missions. A pre-loaded Scatsat-1 required very few commands.
Euroconsult, Paris-based consulting firm specialising in space commerce, in its July report takes note of the “unprecedented” growth of this sector globally. It estimates that more than 3,600 small satellites are expected to be launched over the next 10 years, much more than during the last decade.
Their market value, including the cost of satellites and their launch fee, is put at at $22 billion - which would be 76 per cent more than what it was in the previous decade (2006-15).
 

Chinmoy

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It's made to make someone butthurt. Whenever India conducts a manned spaceflight, footage of this suite will make BBC and Al Jazeera only madder that how a country with 500% poor population can have a space program.:rofl:
If I am not wrong and my memory is good enough, perhaps its called something like Vyomnaut suit or something like that. Isn't it so??
 

IndianHawk

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We have hunger problem because we can't stop wastage of our surplus production and our pds system has leakages.
It has nothing to do with space program.

We need 1 trillion $$ for infra development.
Our space budget is peanuts .

Malnutrition is a problem but solution to that again comes from research I.e. Fortified foods.

Poverty ends when nation create wealth.
To generate wealth it needs to be ahead in cutting edge technologies and that is exactly what isro is doing.

West will cry because now we are competing with them taking away their high paying jobs .

They can no longer justify their 100000$ plus salaries when Indian engineers scientists can deliver better at much less.
Hence the butt hurt

We need to march ahead in tech , space and defense without giving a damn.
As for as BBC and Al-Jazeera is concerned we need to launch new global channels and put them out of business too:india:
 

sorcerer

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ISRO looking at putting a Telescope on Moon
Space agency is expecting the second moon mission to take place by the end of next year

The Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) is exploring possibilities of setting up a telescope on moon as part of enhancing its scientific observation capacity. The space agency is expecting the second moon mission to take place by the end of next year, said A S Kiran Kumar, chairman of the Isro.

The agency is looking at what could be the next Astrosat-follow on mission. Speaking to the students of the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, he said, "There is some discussion with an international body, and this discussion is in progress, on whether we can set up a telescope on moon."

At present, in Hanle, in Leh, Ladakh, there is a remote telescope operational, and its actual operation is done from Bengaluru with very minimal support from Hanle. The Isro is exploring that if it can set up a telescope in moon in the same way, there would not be any atmosphetic effect since there is no atmosphere, which is an advantage.


"These are under discussion and may be in future we will come up with what kind of scientific observation capability we will have for ourselves," he added.

India launched its first dedicated multi wave length space observatory Astrosat in September, 2015, for studies related to black holes and neutron stars.

He added that various tests related to Chandrayan 2 mission is under progress and it is expected to take place by the end of next year, while another planetary mission Aditya to study Sun is expected in 2018.

For Chandrayan 2, tests on controls over the lander and rover while landing on moon are to be tested by the end of this year and the early next year. Many of the activities are supported by student groups.

It will be conducting a maneuvering of the Mars Orbitor so that it can sustain an eclipse and without the maneuvering, the battery of the orbitor cannot sustain the duration of eclipse. The orbitor still has 35 kg of fuel in it and can go on for longer term once it successfully pass the eclipse challenge.

The semi cryogenic engine, which would help the space vehicles to carry more payload is under development with the support of an international agency and would be ready in two years. There is a roadmap enhancing the capabilities of the Isro to carry upto 10 tonnes of payload in future, he said.

However, he said, there is more demand for small capacity vehicles, for commercial purposes where companies want to put constellation of small satellites and replace them frequently.

He added that with the private sector taking on the national agencies in the space exploration, the challenge for the Isro is to keep on innovating and changing in the forefront of the space activities. The agency is already engaged with academies and students for this and it has around 150-200 students doing internship in each of its centres.
http://www.business-standard.com/ar...moon-says-a-s-kiran-kumar-116101401285_1.html
 
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ISRO looking at putting a Telescope on Moon
Space agency is expecting the second moon mission to take place by the end of next year

The Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) is exploring possibilities of setting up a telescope on moon as part of enhancing its scientific observation capacity. The space agency is expecting the second moon mission to take place by the end of next year, said A S Kiran Kumar, chairman of the Isro.

The agency is looking at what could be the next Astrosat-follow on mission. Speaking to the students of the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, he said, "There is some discussion with an international body, and this discussion is in progress, on whether we can set up a telescope on moon."

At present, in Hanle, in Leh, Ladakh, there is a remote telescope operational, and its actual operation is done from Bengaluru with very minimal support from Hanle. The Isro is exploring that if it can set up a telescope in moon in the same way, there would not be any atmosphetic effect since there is no atmosphere, which is an advantage.


"These are under discussion and may be in future we will come up with what kind of scientific observation capability we will have for ourselves," he added.

India launched its first dedicated multi wave length space observatory Astrosat in September, 2015, for studies related to black holes and neutron stars.

He added that various tests related to Chandrayan 2 mission is under progress and it is expected to take place by the end of next year, while another planetary mission Aditya to study Sun is expected in 2018.

For Chandrayan 2, tests on controls over the lander and rover while landing on moon are to be tested by the end of this year and the early next year. Many of the activities are supported by student groups.

It will be conducting a maneuvering of the Mars Orbitor so that it can sustain an eclipse and without the maneuvering, the battery of the orbitor cannot sustain the duration of eclipse. The orbitor still has 35 kg of fuel in it and can go on for longer term once it successfully pass the eclipse challenge.

The semi cryogenic engine, which would help the space vehicles to carry more payload is under development with the support of an international agency and would be ready in two years. There is a roadmap enhancing the capabilities of the Isro to carry upto 10 tonnes of payload in future, he said.

However, he said, there is more demand for small capacity vehicles, for commercial purposes where companies want to put constellation of small satellites and replace them frequently.

He added that with the private sector taking on the national agencies in the space exploration, the challenge for the Isro is to keep on innovating and changing in the forefront of the space activities. The agency is already engaged with academies and students for this and it has around 150-200 students doing internship in each of its centres.
http://www.business-standard.com/ar...moon-says-a-s-kiran-kumar-116101401285_1.html
We have dedicated threads for Moon Exploration and space telescopes.
I'm putting your post link there.;)
http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/threads/indian-lunar-space-probes-and-exploration.77530/

http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/...pace-exploration-observatories-orbital.77402/
 
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Why GSLV Mark III’s Success Is Really Important
Surajit Dasgupta - October 14, 2016, 1:50 PM
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SNAPSHOT
While success stories keep emanating from ISRO, space science enthusiasts have been wondering when India’s space agency will no longer need rockets of the European Space Agency to launch heavy satellites?

It is a monumental challenge to put a satellite on top of the earth’s equator, making it move with a velocity equal to that of our planet’s rotation.

On 6 October, India’s space scientists succeeded in the launching of GSAT-18 communication satellite from Kourou, French Guiana, located on the north-east of the South American continent. While success stories keep emanating from ISRO, space science enthusiasts have been wondering when India’s space agency will no longer need rockets of the European Space Agency to launch heavy satellites and place them in geostationary orbits. On this occasion, we used the Ariane 5 rocket of the French company Arianespace.
The wait wouldn’t be long, given that our Geosynchronous Launch Vehicle Mark III is slated to debut this December after its engine is tested as fulfilling all the necessary parameters. “The satellite is scheduled to be launched during Fourth Quarter of 2016 by GSLV-Mk III-D1 Launcher from SDSC SHAR, Sriharikota,” the relevant page on the ISRO website reads.
All the reports that we have received so far of ISRO’s successful rocket launches using wholly Indian facilities pertained to the less advanced — but commercially a big hit among India’s international customers — PSLV (Polar SLV) with loads much less than that of the GSAT-18, which weighs 3,404 kg. The weight owes to the fact that a satellite of the kind holds Ka and Ku band payloads and a geostationary radiation spectrometer; the idea is “to monitor and study the nature of the charged particles and influence of space radiation on spacecraft and electronic components”, ISRO says. Launched by different rockets, these payloads together make satellites weigh never less than 2,000 kg each. The spectrometer would increase the weight of the satellite further by about 1,400-1,500 kg.
It is a monumental challenge to put a satellite on top of the earth’s equator, making it move with a velocity equal to that of our planet’s rotation. The satellite must move much faster to stay over a fixed spot on earth because the circumference of its orbit is much larger than that of the earth surface.
But lighter rockets are not a mean achievement of ISRO, on the backdrop of an international sanction against supplying the cryogenic engine to India. Undaunted by the sanction, India’s space scientists developed one indigenously (1994-2008), and they have not rested on the laurels ever since.
In fact, foreign technology is no way the key to success in this field. After the project to make the GSLV was conceived in 2000, the development flight of the first rocket that used a Russian cryogenic engine failed on 18 April 2001 because of a flaw in the design of the propulsion system. GSLV Mk 1a and 1b succeeded when the full-size core stage was deployed, putting GSAT 2 & 3 into the intended orbits.
More hits and misses followed. The GSLV that tried to place INSAT 4C into orbit in July 2006 failed when a booster malfunctioned. That was followed by the partial success of GSLV Mk II the next year, which placed INSAT 4CR lower than the orbit intended due an underperforming flight control system; a spacecraft then had to push the satellite higher. Next, in 2010, the GSLV Mk II failed because the upper stage did not work.
The complexity of the process can be appreciated by following the trajectory of the rocket from the stage where the lowest part is ignited first. As the rocket, which is not supposed to rise straight up as it must catch a certain spot in an orbit over the earth’s equator that is constantly rotating, the subsequent stages involve a combination of chemical engineering, mechanics and dynamics. Combustion at the same rate is not advisable for the rocket whose weight is constantly reducing due to the lower parts burning out. That calls for a combination of fuels; the energy from a liquid fuel can be regulated much better than that from a solid fuel. Since the angle of the flight must change gradually to catch up with the intended spot on the designated orbit, it is about mathematics. India is using a solid-liquid-liquid propulsion from the lowest to the uppermost stage. As different fuels will propel the rocket (whose weight is constantly reducing) at different speeds, it means a combination of chemistry (inorganic for solids and organic for liquids), mechanics (physics of machines) and dynamics (mathematics of movements).
When the rocket has lost all its parts but one, it is the stage where manoeuvring must be the nimblest. It is that phase where escape velocity must give way to orbital velocity, as the rocket will thereafter not move higher from the earth but start revolving around it. Whatever failures ISRO has seen is, therefore, in the chemistry-physics combo. The composition of the rocket and its thrust are not able to match the mathematical calculation of the ground station.
But every failure also means loss in crores besides leaving our space scientists depressed for a while. The indomitable but wise ISRO scientists therefore took the simulation route. Even without the C-25 cryogenic upper stage, which will not be ready before 2017, ISRO conducted the first test flight of GSLV Mk III on 18 December 2014 following the cold flow test of the C-20 cryogenic engine two months before that.
The upper stage of this rocket was a mere simulator. The model was structurally the same and the trajectory sub-orbital. The frame, heat shield and parachute system were all basic. This rocket carrying a 3,735 kg load successfully went 126 km up and descended back to the earth’s atmosphere with a velocity of 5,300 m/s, finally slowing down with the opening of its parachute and plunging into the Indian Ocean near the Andamans.
But before the whole rocket is tested, parts thereof must conform to the standards. Hence, 24 January 2010 and 4 September 2011 saw static tests of the solid rocket booster to address the shortcoming of 2006. The Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre tested the liquid-motored core stage (known as L110) two months after the first successful static test of the booster. ISRO’s Sriharikota facility is working diligently on the S200 boosters in the meantime.
The toughest challenge of building the upper stage will naturally take the longest time. The CE-20 has a gas generator cycle, a first for India. By 2017, to make sure that our satellites do not fall short of reaching the intended orbit, the SCE-200 liquid-fuel rocket engine may be added. This will enhance the payload carrying capacity to 6 tonnes at the geosynchronous transfer orbit or last stage of placing the satellite at its fixed position on the orbit vis-à-vis a spot on earth.
Let’s pray for the success of our space scientists. While we never tire advocating the private sector’s entry in every sector, the industry shows no interest in research in this field; it comes forward only at the stage of manufacturing — former ISRO chairman K Kasturirangan had said in July this year. That means that the mission must succeed not only because all the transponders would telecommunications services for India, but also because all the money that goes into these missions is taxpayers’ money.
 
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Story of the Week - Indian Space Research Organization
INSAT-3DR Augments INSAT-3D for Improved Weather Monitoring and Prediction

Three-dimensional observations of atmosphere along with the land and ocean are required for various applications. One of the most important applications is weather prediction that is very crucial in planning of day-to-day events affecting human life in many ways. Knowledge of weather parameters is also important for controlling the agricultural production. For example, adequate amount of rainfall at the time of sowing and favourable temperature and moisture conditions during different phases of crop growth is very important for healthy crop production. With increased focus on the monitoring and forecasting of rapidly evolving weather processes the need for improved temporal and spatial observations has become more critical.
Historically, such weather information was obtained through a network of ground observatories established by meteorological establishments, such as India Meteorology Department (IMD). However, this information was limited to a few selected cities. A satellite provides continuous observations over an entire viewing region including ocean, desert, mountains, etc,. that were difficult from the ground network.
India realised the importance of satellites for land-atmosphere-ocean observations and it has become a major thrust area for the Indian Space Programme (ISP). In this direction the INSAT series of multi-purpose geostationary satellites, conceived in the early eighties, became pivotal to meet the operational needs of weather services in the country.
After realising its potential for meteorological applications, ISRO initiated work on the dedicated satellites for meteorological applications during last decade. ISRO launched its first exclusive meteorological satellite, Kalpana-1, on September 12, 2002. Kalpana-1 has a Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) with three channels providing weather parameters like Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMV), Rainfall estimates, Upper Tropospheric Humidity, Outgoing Longwave Radiation, Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and various other agromet parameters. The half-hourly image sequences are used for the monitoring of important weather events like heavy rainfall, onset of monsoon, tropical cyclone, and numerical weather prediction.
Kalpana-1 were followed by a quantum jump in the observational capability of ISP with the launch of INSAT-3D in July 2013. INSAT-3D satellite with a 19-channel Sounder and a 6-channel advanced Imager is helping in the identification of the sporadic natural hazards like flash floods, cyclones, wildfire, fog, upper air turbulence, thunderstorm, etc.
INSAT-3D was followed by the INSAT-3DR that was launched by GSLV-F05 rocket into the geostationary transfer orbit on September 08, 2016. INSAT-3DR is identical to INSAT-3D in configuration. The atmospheric vertical profiles of temperature and humidity from INSAT-3D/3DR Sounders have added a new dimension in the observational capability for monitoring and predicting the rapidly developing weather systems. Sounder instruments provide 3-dimensional thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere over Indian landmass allowing the forecasters to identify the areas of possible severe weather conditions such as thunderstorm well in advance.
The combination of INSAT-3D and INSAT-3DR provide the multi-spectral images of the earth and the atmosphere at every 15-minute interval from Imager and 30-minute interval from the Sounder that ensures more accurate and timely detection of weather parameters around the Indian subcontinent.
INSAT-3D/3DR Imagers have split-window thermal infrared channels for accurate estimation of SST. Addition of a new 3.9 micron channel helps in improved SST estimation besides helping in locating the forest-fire events and also in identifying the fog covered areas. Shortwave infrared band at 1.4 micron helps in identification of the snow cover, and the phase of water in the clouds. The visible channel along with other Imager channels provides the cloud information. The improved spatial and temporal resolutions in INSAT-3D/3DR Imagers has paved way for more accurate estimates of AMV winds that results in improved weather prediction. The Upper tropospheric humidity and Outgoing Longwave Radiation are helping in monitoring the deep convection. These parameters are also important indicators of climate change. Rainfall estimates generated at 15-minute interval are important for agriculture. INSAT-3D/3DR Imagery with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions also provide an excellent insight into the patterns of cyclonic activity over India, helping in the improved cyclone track prediction and intensity estimation.
During clear-sky conditions, the INSAT-3D/3DR imageries help in capturing different land cover types such as cropland, forest, desert, grassland, wetlands, inland water bodies, snow-glacier, etc,. in optical and thermal bands. Atmospheric haze due to dust aerosols and transport of dust can also be identified from Imager optical band.
All these geo-physical data products of INSAT-3D/3DR are disseminated through Metrological and Oceanographic Satellite Data Archival Centre (MOSDAC) for in-house R&D work and other users.

Images from INSAT-3DR Imager channel (left, centre) and MWIR-1 Sounder channel (right)

Link to Cloud Cover Over India
Story of the Week - Archive
Oct 17, 2016 : INSAT-3DR Augments INSAT-3D for Improved Weather Monitoring and Prediction
Oct 10, 2016 : Indian Space Science Data Centre (ISSDC) - Gateway to India's Space Science Data
Oct 03, 2016 : AstroSat Completes One Year in Orbit
Sep 26, 2016 : SCATSAT-1 – Satellite for Weather Forecasting, Cyclone Detection and Tracking
Sep 19, 2016 : Updated Flood Hazard Atlas for Assam State
Sep 12, 2016 : Bengaluru Space Expo (BSX)-2016
Sep 06, 2016 : MoU signed for Transfer of Technology for Manufacturing of HMC DC-DC Converters
 

sorcerer

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Isro's mission to Mars: Intergalactic travel not far away, says Mangalyaan deputy director

Whatever maybe the challenges, human beings are likely to journey to Mars in the 2030s. The Red Planet’s average distance from the earth is 225 million kilometres and India sent forth its own spacecraft Mangalyaan which is presently orbiting the Martian atmosphere and sending back information regarding Mars surface features, morphology, mineralogy and of course the Martian atmosphere which does not have an ozone layer to protect human beings from ultraviolet radiation.

But Ritu Karidhal, one of the speakers at 'Josh Talk' and deputy director of ISRO’s Mangalyaan programme believes this interplanetary mission will open the door for further significant space explorations including sending human beings to Mars. Karidhal said, "I believe Nasa is working on sending astronauts to [R1] Mars and they have made progress in this field. I believe they will be able to reach there in the 2030s.

http://www.firstpost.com/india/isro...-says-mangalyaan-deputy-director-3055652.html
 
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ECIL and ISRO enter pact to develop antenna
Electronics Corporation of India Limited (ECIL) under the Department of Atomic Energy entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Telemetry Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC), Bangalore, for the development of 18-meter antenna for Indian Deep Space Network.
At a function held in Bangalore, ECIL CMD P Sudhakar and ISTRAC Director KVVSSSR Anjaneyulu signed the MOU which will facilitate ISRO and ECIL to jointly work for the indigenous design and realisation of the antenna systems for the upcoming missions like Aditya, Chandrayaan-2 and Mars Orbiter-2.
The ECIL has earlier indigenously built a 32-meter Deep Space Network antenna in close association with ISTRAC and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) to provide telemetry tracking and command support for Chandrayaan-1 Mission and Mars Orbiter Mission -1.
The 18-meter antenna presently taken up for development shall have simultaneous transmit and receive capability and will be installed at ISDN campus in Bylalu near Bangalore, a press release said.
I hope @Martian may not be able to.troll us for using American Network like in Mangalyaan next time.:p
 
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Khodad radio telescope catches signals from Europe's mission to Mars
Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope
PUNE: In a historic achievement, the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope(GMRT) situated in Khodad, about 60 kilometres from Pune, detected very weak radio signals from a space probe sent to Mars by the European Space Agency (ESA). The GMRT was selected as the Earth-based observatory to provide ground support for the ESA's ExoMars mission, which aims to explore various properties of Mars, and also land a probe on the surface to explore technologies for the future.
The GMRT detected the radio signals (around 401 MHz) which were emitted by this European space probe at the time of the lander's separation from the orbiter, as it closed in on Mars after a sixmonth journey.
In Monday's event, spectra from the GMRT processing system were transmitted live to the ESA mission control room in Germany , and were an integral part of their monitoring procedure.
It was a rather long recording, but the interesting part comes around the time marker (see image) where the GMRT signal is shown for the first time, prompting the Flight Director to identify it as the "signal from Pune". Yashwant Gupta, Dean, GMRT, said, "ESA had sent a mission to Mars called ExoMars mission six months ago. Now, on Wednesday, at around 8.30pm IST, the probelander will detach itself from the spacecraft and land on the surface of Mars. This is a very crucial time when the lander will go through Mars's atmosphere.A radio frequency transmitter will transmit waves and these waves will be the only means to find out the health of the lander. It has to be ensured that the lander, which will travel at a very high speed, doesn't overheat, and also lands without taking damage. The whole time GMRT will be observing, detecting and transmitting the waves received from the lander."
Hailing this as an exciting development, Somak RayChaudhury , director, InterUniversity Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, said, "The GMRT, run by the NCRA Centre of TIFR in Pune, is now a crucial contributor to the ExoMars mission of ESA. This is an exciting development in the history of one of the few truly international scientific facilities we have in India. We are all eagerly following the mission, and GMRT's role in it, as the story unfolds," he said.
 

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