ISRO General News and Updates

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Space-enthuse Start-ups are approaching IN-SPACe with innovative ideas. As a key enabler, IN-SPACe has taken the lead to create a unique platform that provides a one stop solution to foster and transform their innovations into a full-fledged space product.



As a head start for these start-ups, IN-SPACe has taken initiative to establish a Design Lab equipped with high-end simulation tools required from mission planning to RF, structural and thermal design and analysis of space systems. Start-ups will have access to these tools operating on high performance computing systems for carrying out their mission specific simulations and analysis. Through this Design Lab, the Start-ups would be able to verify and visualise their designs before metal cutting as well as validate the test results of the fabricated product with minimum turnaround time
 

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Swesh

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Will this involve docking also??
Nope all are PS4-OP experiment for docking you need 2 seprate module to be launched separately
Here they are using 4rth stage as satellite with 10 separate experimental Payload on it they will not be launched in space separately they will transmit while being attached to PS4 STAGE
 
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  • Home >>
  • Astronomers develop a low-cost alternative for satellites to orient themselves in space
Astronomers develop a low-cost alternative for satellites to orient themselves in space
A new low-cost star sensor developed by astronomers from off-the-shelf components can help small CubeSat class satellite missions find their orientation in space. This instrument, 'Starberry-Sense,' is ready for launch on the PS4-Orbital Platform by ISRO and can be used for CubeSats and other small satellite missions in the future.
Any satellite needs to know where it is pointed in space, and the instrument used for this purpose is called a star sensor. The position of stars in the sky is fixed relative to each other and can be used as a stable reference frame to calculate the orientation of a satellite in orbit. This is done by correctly identifying the stars in the sky towards which the star sensor is pointed. The star sensor is essentially a celestial compass.
In recent years CubeSats and small satellite missions have gained huge popularity. These missions utilize commercially available components for their design and development, but the typical cost of a commercially available star sensor often exceeds the total budget for a CubeSat.
Researchers at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) and their collaborators have now developed a star sensor for astronomy and small satellite CubeSat class missions. Based on commercial/off-the-shelf (COTS) components, this star sensor costs less than 10% of those available in the market. The brain of the instrument is a single-board Linux computer called Raspberry Pi, which is widely used among electronics hobby enthusiasts.
“We coupled some highly optimized algorithms with a raspberry Pi and turned it into a potent star sensor, named “StarBerry-Sense,” said Bharat Chandra, a Ph.D. scholar at IIA and the first author of the research about this work which was published in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems. “We could demonstrate that instruments built from easily available components can be qualified for space,” he added.
The main advantage of the system is the low cost and the short development cycle with COTS components which are readily available. “Our modular design allows for quick and easy customization for various requirements. For e.g., even though StarBerry-Sense is meant for space-based applications, a modified version will be interfaced with the Major Atmospheric Cherenkov Experiment (MACE), located at the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO), Hanle, Ladakh”, said Binukumar Nair, a co-author of the study.
The star sensor has successfully undergone the vibration and thermal vacuum test that qualifies it for a space launch and operations, and these tests were conducted in-house at the environmental test facility located at the CREST Campus of IIA in Hosakote.
The system was developed around the very popular Raspberry Pi Zero (a 1 GHz single-board computer, smaller than a credit card) as the main processing unit and its camera module. The entire setup is housed inside a protective aerospace-grade aluminum enclosure. StarBerry-Sense captures sky images and identifies the stars in the field by comparing their location with an onboard catalog of bright stars. The information is then used to identify which part of the sky the star sensor is looking at, helping locate the orientation of the satellite.
The study is authored by Bharat Chandra, Student, Integrated MTech-PhD in Astronomical Instrumentation, IIA, Mayuresh Sarpotdar, presently working with Dhruva Space (Hyderabad) after obtaining his Ph.D. from IIA, Binukumar G. Nair, visiting Scientist at IIA, Richa Rai, a post-doctoral fellow at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Trieste, Italy, Rekhesh Mohan, Scientist D, IIA, Joice Mathew, instrumentation scientist at Australian National University (ANU), Margarita Safonova, DST-Woman Scientist under WOS-A Scheme, IIA and Jayant Murthy, Retired Senior Professor, IIA.
Links to publication: https://arxiv.org/abs/2207.03087 &
https://www.spiedigitallibrary.org/...ll-satellites/10.1117/1.JATIS.8.3.036002.full

Exploded view of StarBerry Sense
[/QUOTE]
This will also launched in PSLV c55 PS4-OP as an 1 of 10 experimental payload @Vamsi @Indx TechStyle
 

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  • Home >>
  • Astronomers develop a low-cost alternative for satellites to orient themselves in space
Astronomers develop a low-cost alternative for satellites to orient themselves in space
A new low-cost star sensor developed by astronomers from off-the-shelf components can help small CubeSat class satellite missions find their orientation in space. This instrument, 'Starberry-Sense,' is ready for launch on the PS4-Orbital Platform by ISRO and can be used for CubeSats and other small satellite missions in the future.
Any satellite needs to know where it is pointed in space, and the instrument used for this purpose is called a star sensor. The position of stars in the sky is fixed relative to each other and can be used as a stable reference frame to calculate the orientation of a satellite in orbit. This is done by correctly identifying the stars in the sky towards which the star sensor is pointed. The star sensor is essentially a celestial compass.
In recent years CubeSats and small satellite missions have gained huge popularity. These missions utilize commercially available components for their design and development, but the typical cost of a commercially available star sensor often exceeds the total budget for a CubeSat.
Researchers at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) and their collaborators have now developed a star sensor for astronomy and small satellite CubeSat class missions. Based on commercial/off-the-shelf (COTS) components, this star sensor costs less than 10% of those available in the market. The brain of the instrument is a single-board Linux computer called Raspberry Pi, which is widely used among electronics hobby enthusiasts.
“We coupled some highly optimized algorithms with a raspberry Pi and turned it into a potent star sensor, named “StarBerry-Sense,” said Bharat Chandra, a Ph.D. scholar at IIA and the first author of the research about this work which was published in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems. “We could demonstrate that instruments built from easily available components can be qualified for space,” he added.
The main advantage of the system is the low cost and the short development cycle with COTS components which are readily available. “Our modular design allows for quick and easy customization for various requirements. For e.g., even though StarBerry-Sense is meant for space-based applications, a modified version will be interfaced with the Major Atmospheric Cherenkov Experiment (MACE), located at the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO), Hanle, Ladakh”, said Binukumar Nair, a co-author of the study.
The star sensor has successfully undergone the vibration and thermal vacuum test that qualifies it for a space launch and operations, and these tests were conducted in-house at the environmental test facility located at the CREST Campus of IIA in Hosakote.
The system was developed around the very popular Raspberry Pi Zero (a 1 GHz single-board computer, smaller than a credit card) as the main processing unit and its camera module. The entire setup is housed inside a protective aerospace-grade aluminum enclosure. StarBerry-Sense captures sky images and identifies the stars in the field by comparing their location with an onboard catalog of bright stars. The information is then used to identify which part of the sky the star sensor is looking at, helping locate the orientation of the satellite.
The study is authored by Bharat Chandra, Student, Integrated MTech-PhD in Astronomical Instrumentation, IIA, Mayuresh Sarpotdar, presently working with Dhruva Space (Hyderabad) after obtaining his Ph.D. from IIA, Binukumar G. Nair, visiting Scientist at IIA, Richa Rai, a post-doctoral fellow at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Trieste, Italy, Rekhesh Mohan, Scientist D, IIA, Joice Mathew, instrumentation scientist at Australian National University (ANU), Margarita Safonova, DST-Woman Scientist under WOS-A Scheme, IIA and Jayant Murthy, Retired Senior Professor, IIA.
Links to publication: https://arxiv.org/abs/2207.03087 &
https://www.spiedigitallibrary.org/...ll-satellites/10.1117/1.JATIS.8.3.036002.full

Exploded view of StarBerry Sense
This will also launched in PSLV c55 PS4-OP as an 1 of 10 experimental payload @Vamsi @Indx TechStyle
[/QUOTE]
Research paper in this project
 

Indx TechStyle

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nah it has been booked for 10 more launches atleast before it retires ..

upcoming payloads for GSLV are
NVS-01/02/03/04/05
INSAT-3DS
NISAR
GISAT-2
IDRSS-01/02
The MK-2,i find to be the strangest rocket in operation anywhere in the world. A Solid core and a Hypergolic Boosters,the core dies out before the boosters because of which they have to carry the weight of the dead core stage for almost 1 minute.
AFAIK, they have already announced that GSLV will be discontinued after booked launches. So will PSLV and entire series will be replaced by a single family of modular rockets. That depends upon timeline of NGLV and SCE200 though.
 

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The contract with NSIL, a Central Public Sector Enterprise under Department of Space, Bengaluru pertains to procurement of an advanced Communication Satellite, GSAT 7B, which will provide High Throughput Services to the Indian Army at an overall cost of Rs 2,963 crore.

Advanced Communication Satellite

The satellite will considerably enhance the communication capability of the Indian Army by providing mission critical beyond line of sight communication to troops and formations as well as weapon and airborne platforms. The geostationary satellite, being a first-of-its-kind in the five-tonne category, will be developed indigenously by Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

Many parts and sub-assemblies and systems will be sourced from indigenous manufacturers, including MSMEs and start-ups, thereby giving a fillip to the private Indian space industry, in line with the Prime Minister’s vision of ‘Aatmanirbhar Bharat’. The project will generate an employment of approximately three lakh man-days over a period of three and half years.
 

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The contract with NSIL, a Central Public Sector Enterprise under Department of Space, Bengaluru pertains to procurement of an advanced Communication Satellite, GSAT 7B, which will provide High Throughput Services to the Indian Army at an overall cost of Rs 2,963 crore.

Advanced Communication Satellite

The satellite will considerably enhance the communication capability of the Indian Army by providing mission critical beyond line of sight communication to troops and formations as well as weapon and airborne platforms. The geostationary satellite, being a first-of-its-kind in the five-tonne category, will be developed indigenously by Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

Many parts and sub-assemblies and systems will be sourced from indigenous manufacturers, including MSMEs and start-ups, thereby giving a fillip to the private Indian space industry, in line with the Prime Minister’s vision of ‘Aatmanirbhar Bharat’. The project will generate an employment of approximately three lakh man-days over a period of three and half years.
which rocket LVM-3SC or Ariane 5 ?
 

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The contract with NSIL, a Central Public Sector Enterprise under Department of Space, Bengaluru pertains to procurement of an advanced Communication Satellite, GSAT 7B, which will provide High Throughput Services to the Indian Army at an overall cost of Rs 2,963 crore.

Advanced Communication Satellite

The satellite will considerably enhance the communication capability of the Indian Army by providing mission critical beyond line of sight communication to troops and formations as well as weapon and airborne platforms. The geostationary satellite, being a first-of-its-kind in the five-tonne category, will be developed indigenously by Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

Many parts and sub-assemblies and systems will be sourced from indigenous manufacturers, including MSMEs and start-ups, thereby giving a fillip to the private Indian space industry, in line with the Prime Minister’s vision of ‘Aatmanirbhar Bharat’. The project will generate an employment of approximately three lakh man-days over a period of three and half years.
what will be the masses of Navy's GSAT-7R & IAF's GSAT-7C??
 

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what will be the masses of Navy's GSAT-7R & IAF's GSAT-7C??
I will answer these questions but first thing first


NSIL sponsored commercial launches of TeLEOS-2 aboard the PSLV C55,

DS-SAR aboard the PSLV C-57 and

ANWESHA aboard the PSLV C58 are also scheduled in 2023.

Aaditya-L1 - the first Indian Space mission to study the Sun, aboard the PSLV C56;

XPoSAT- The X-Ray Polarimeter Satellite, India's first dedicated polarimetry mission to study the dynamics of bright astronomical X-ray sources in extreme conditions, aboard the SSLV-D3;

Chandrayaan-3 - the follow-up mission to Chandrayaan-2, intended to demonstrate soft landing on the lunar surface, aboard the LVM3-M4. The spacecraft is being readied incorporating the learnings from Chandrayaan-2 mission, with additional tests being conducted towards ensuring a higher degree of ruggedness in the lande

The launch of Radar Imaging Satellite- RISAT 1 B aboard the PSLV C60 is planned in 2nd half of 2023.
 

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I will answer these questions but first thing first


NSIL sponsored commercial launches of TeLEOS-2 aboard the PSLV C55,

DS-SAR aboard the PSLV C-57 and

ANWESHA aboard the PSLV C58 are also scheduled in 2023.

Aaditya-L1 - the first Indian Space mission to study the Sun, aboard the PSLV C56;

XPoSAT- The X-Ray Polarimeter Satellite, India's first dedicated polarimetry mission to study the dynamics of bright astronomical X-ray sources in extreme conditions, aboard the SSLV-D3;

Chandrayaan-3 - the follow-up mission to Chandrayaan-2, intended to demonstrate soft landing on the lunar surface, aboard the LVM3-M4. The spacecraft is being readied incorporating the learnings from Chandrayaan-2 mission, with additional tests being conducted towards ensuring a higher degree of ruggedness in the lande

The launch of Radar Imaging Satellite- RISAT 1 B aboard the PSLV C60 is planned in 2nd half of 2023.
1. Is DS-SAR foreign sat ?
2. no mention of PSLV-C59?
 

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1. DS-SAR is a Singaporean SAR Earth Observation satellite. It is built by IAI.

The satellite will be used for government and commercial purposes; DS-SAR will be used to support the satellite imagery requirements of Singapore government agencies, including for maritime security and the detection of oil spills. At the same time, the images captured by DS-SAR will be used to enhance ST Electronics’ commercial imagery services.

DSTA (Defence Science and Technology Agency) – part of the Singapore Ministry of Defence – alongside ST Electronics – part of major regional defence and engineering group ST Engineering – have ordered in 2018 an Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite from Israeli manufacturer Israel Aerosapce Industries (IAI). This foreign-built SAR, DS-SAR, satellite will support their already in orbit, domestically built TELEOS 1 Earth observation spacecraft which was launched in 2015.
 

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which rocket LVM-3SC or Ariane 5 ?
That depends upon availablity of lmv3 with hsf and commercial and scientific missions lmv3 production factory will be busy also depends that how much army can wait
 

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That depends upon availablity of lmv3 with hsf and commercial and scientific missions lmv3 production factory will be busy also depends that how much army can wait
GSAT-7B is a 5 ton class satellite, most probably a I-6K satellite ....so I'm asking whether it will be semi-cryo version of LVM-3 or Ariane-5??
 

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