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Rassil Krishnan

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ISRO Completes Major Development Test of its Gaganyaan Parachute System

ISRO Completes Major Development Test of its Gaganyaan Parachute System

Integrated Main Parachute Airdrop Test (IMAT)
On Friday, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, where many Gaganyaan activities are progressing, conducted a major development test "Integrated Main Parachute Airdrop Test, or IMAT " of its crew module deceleration system at the Babina Field Fire Range (BFFR) in the Jhansi district of Uttar Pradesh. This test marks a significant milestone toward realizing the nation's ambitious Gaganyaan project.
Parachute based Deceleration system for Crew module
For Gaganyaan Crew module, the Parachute system consists of a totally of 10 no. of parachutes. In flight, the parachute sequence starts with deployment of 2 Nos. of Apex cover separation parachutes (protection cover for the Crew Module Parachute compartment) followed by 2 Nos. of Drogue parachute deployment to stabilise & bring down the velocity. Upon Drogue parachute release, 3 Nos. of Pilot chute will be used to extract 3 Nos. of Main parachute individually, to reduce the speed of the Crew module to safe levels during its landing. Two of the three main chutes are sufficient to land the astronauts on earth, and the third is redundant. Each parachute's performance must be evaluated by complex testing methods using Rail Track Rocket Sled (RTRS) tests for smaller Parachutes and Aircraft/ Helicopters for the Main parachutes.
The Integrated Main Parachute Airdrop Test simulated the case when one Main parachute failed to open and it is the first in a series of tests planned to simulate different failure conditions of the parachute system before it is deemed qualified to be used in the first human spaceflight mission. In this test, a 5-ton dummy mass, equivalent to the Crew module mass, was taken to an altitude of 2.5 kilometres and dropped using the Indian Air force's IL-76 aircraft. Two small pyro-based mortar-deployed pilot parachutes, then pulled the Main parachutes. The fully inflated Main parachutes reduced the payload speed to a safe landing speed as the entire sequence lasted about 2-3 minutes and the payload mass landed softly on the ground.
The design and development of the Parachute based Deceleration system for Crew module is a joint venture between Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) and with this test, a significant milestone toward realizing the nation's ambitious Gaganyaan project is achieved with the active coordination between the country's premier agencies, namely ISRO, DRDO, the Indian air force, and the Indian Army.



Integrated Main Parachute Airdrop Test

Here is the video link :
https://www.vssc.gov.in/Gaganyaan_Parachute_System_Test.html
 

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ISRO Completes Major Development Test of its Gaganyaan Parachute System

ISRO Completes Major Development Test of its Gaganyaan Parachute System

Integrated Main Parachute Airdrop Test (IMAT)
On Friday, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, where many Gaganyaan activities are progressing, conducted a major development test "Integrated Main Parachute Airdrop Test, or IMAT " of its crew module deceleration system at the Babina Field Fire Range (BFFR) in the Jhansi district of Uttar Pradesh. This test marks a significant milestone toward realizing the nation's ambitious Gaganyaan project.
Parachute based Deceleration system for Crew module
For Gaganyaan Crew module, the Parachute system consists of a totally of 10 no. of parachutes. In flight, the parachute sequence starts with deployment of 2 Nos. of Apex cover separation parachutes (protection cover for the Crew Module Parachute compartment) followed by 2 Nos. of Drogue parachute deployment to stabilise & bring down the velocity. Upon Drogue parachute release, 3 Nos. of Pilot chute will be used to extract 3 Nos. of Main parachute individually, to reduce the speed of the Crew module to safe levels during its landing. Two of the three main chutes are sufficient to land the astronauts on earth, and the third is redundant. Each parachute's performance must be evaluated by complex testing methods using Rail Track Rocket Sled (RTRS) tests for smaller Parachutes and Aircraft/ Helicopters for the Main parachutes.
The Integrated Main Parachute Airdrop Test simulated the case when one Main parachute failed to open and it is the first in a series of tests planned to simulate different failure conditions of the parachute system before it is deemed qualified to be used in the first human spaceflight mission. In this test, a 5-ton dummy mass, equivalent to the Crew module mass, was taken to an altitude of 2.5 kilometres and dropped using the Indian Air force's IL-76 aircraft. Two small pyro-based mortar-deployed pilot parachutes, then pulled the Main parachutes. The fully inflated Main parachutes reduced the payload speed to a safe landing speed as the entire sequence lasted about 2-3 minutes and the payload mass landed softly on the ground.
The design and development of the Parachute based Deceleration system for Crew module is a joint venture between Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) and with this test, a significant milestone toward realizing the nation's ambitious Gaganyaan project is achieved with the active coordination between the country's premier agencies, namely ISRO, DRDO, the Indian air force, and the Indian Army.



Integrated Main Parachute Airdrop Test

Here is the video link :
https://www.vssc.gov.in/Gaganyaan_Parachute_System_Test.html
ISRO Gaganyaan parachute deployment

 

Anandhu Krishna

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Were we suppose to the fourth country to be on the moon!? Now what 6th!?



UAE Moon mission: Rashid rover integrated with SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket for launch

UAE Moon mission: Rashid rover integrated with SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket for launch
Story by Sarwat Nasir • Yesterday 5:04 PM


The Japanese lunar lander with a UAE-built rover on board has been integrated onto a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket for the launch on Wednesday.
SpaceX will attempt to launch the Hakuto-R Mission 1 lander, developed by private company ispace, at 12.39pm UAE time, from the Launch Complex 40 pad at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.
The National is on the Space Coast and will be covering the launch live.
The 10kg Rashid rover is one of many government and commercial payloads that the lander is carrying, with a landing attempt on the Moon expected at the end of April.
“We are pleased to have finished the first phase of the Mission 1 with the final preparations before launch completed,” said Takeshi Hakamada, founder of ispace.
“We have achieved so much in the six short years since we first began conceptualising this project in 2016.”

Rashid rover's journey — in pictures
The Hakuto-R Mission 1 lunar lander is delivered to Florida's Cape Canaveral from where it will carry the UAE's Rashid rover to the Moon. Photo: ispace
The Hakuto-R Mission 1 lunar lander is delivered to Florida's Cape Canaveral from where it will carry the UAE's Rashid rover to the Moon. Photo: ispace© Provided by The National
The Hakuto lander with the Rashid rover stored inside, ready to be shipped to Florida. Photo: ispace
The Hakuto lander with the Rashid rover stored inside, ready to be shipped to Florida. Photo: ispace© Provided by The National
Rashid lunar rover's final prototype. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre
Rashid lunar rover's final prototype. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre© Provided by The National
An Emirati engineer tested the Moon rover in remote desert areas of Dubai. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre
An Emirati engineer tested the Moon rover in remote desert areas of Dubai. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre© Provided by The National
Dr Hamad Al Marzooqi, project manager of the Emirates lunar mission. Chris Whiteoak / The National
Dr Hamad Al Marzooqi, project manager of the Emirates lunar mission. Chris Whiteoak / The National© Provided by The National
Development of the lander nears completion. Photo: ispace
Development of the lander nears completion. Photo: ispace© Provided by The National
Emirati engineers test parts of the Rashid rover. Photo: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre
Emirati engineers test parts of the Rashid rover. Photo: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre© Provided by The National
Emirati engineers test parts of the Rashid rover. Photo: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre
Emirati engineers test parts of the Rashid rover. Photo: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre© Provided by The National
A full Moon gleams above Buenos Aires. AFP
A full Moon gleams above Buenos Aires. AFP© Provided by The National
The weather on the Space Coast so far looks suitable for a launch, with clear skies but periodic clouds expected.


There is only a four per cent chance of rain.
This will be the 55th launch for SpaceX this year. The company's reusable Falcon 9 rocket has a very high success rate.
This is the UAE's first Moon mission, with more rovers to be developed in the future.
The Rashid rover has been built by engineers from the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre.
A core team of 11 are behind the mission’s development and have been working on it since 2017.
It has been named in honour of the late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed, the former Ruler of Dubai, and the father of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Vice President and Ruler of Dubai.
Ispace will attempt to land the mission in the Atlas crater in the Mare Frigoris site, located in the far-north of the Moon’s near side.
The Rashid rover will spend one lunar day exploring the area, capturing scientific data and images.
It will study the properties of lunar soil, the petrography and geology of the Moon, dust movement, and study surface plasma conditions and the Moon's photoelectron sheath.
Lunar dust, or regolith, is one of the main challenges astronauts face on the Moon.
It was during the Apollo missions that scientists learnt how lunar dust stuck to spacesuits, causing erosion and operational problems.
The launch on Wednesday will be streamed live by SpaceX.
 

Swesh

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Were we suppose to the fourth country to be on the moon!? Now what 6th!?



UAE Moon mission: Rashid rover integrated with SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket for launch

UAE Moon mission: Rashid rover integrated with SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket for launch
Story by Sarwat Nasir • Yesterday 5:04 PM


The Japanese lunar lander with a UAE-built rover on board has been integrated onto a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket for the launch on Wednesday.
SpaceX will attempt to launch the Hakuto-R Mission 1 lander, developed by private company ispace, at 12.39pm UAE time, from the Launch Complex 40 pad at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.
The National is on the Space Coast and will be covering the launch live.
The 10kg Rashid rover is one of many government and commercial payloads that the lander is carrying, with a landing attempt on the Moon expected at the end of April.
“We are pleased to have finished the first phase of the Mission 1 with the final preparations before launch completed,” said Takeshi Hakamada, founder of ispace.
“We have achieved so much in the six short years since we first began conceptualising this project in 2016.”

Rashid rover's journey — in pictures
The Hakuto-R Mission 1 lunar lander is delivered to Florida's Cape Canaveral from where it will carry the UAE's Rashid rover to the Moon. Photo: ispace's Cape Canaveral from where it will carry the UAE's Rashid rover to the Moon. Photo: ispace
The Hakuto-R Mission 1 lunar lander is delivered to Florida's Cape Canaveral from where it will carry the UAE's Rashid rover to the Moon. Photo: ispace© Provided by The National
The Hakuto lander with the Rashid rover stored inside, ready to be shipped to Florida. Photo: ispace
The Hakuto lander with the Rashid rover stored inside, ready to be shipped to Florida. Photo: ispace© Provided by The National
Rashid lunar rover's final prototype. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre's final prototype. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre
Rashid lunar rover's final prototype. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre© Provided by The National
An Emirati engineer tested the Moon rover in remote desert areas of Dubai. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre
An Emirati engineer tested the Moon rover in remote desert areas of Dubai. Photo: Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre© Provided by The National
Dr Hamad Al Marzooqi, project manager of the Emirates lunar mission. Chris Whiteoak / The National
Dr Hamad Al Marzooqi, project manager of the Emirates lunar mission. Chris Whiteoak / The National© Provided by The National
Development of the lander nears completion. Photo: ispace
Development of the lander nears completion. Photo: ispace© Provided by The National
Emirati engineers test parts of the Rashid rover. Photo: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre
Emirati engineers test parts of the Rashid rover. Photo: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre© Provided by The National
Emirati engineers test parts of the Rashid rover. Photo: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre
Emirati engineers test parts of the Rashid rover. Photo: Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre© Provided by The National
A full Moon gleams above Buenos Aires. AFP
A full Moon gleams above Buenos Aires. AFP© Provided by The National
The weather on the Space Coast so far looks suitable for a launch, with clear skies but periodic clouds expected.


There is only a four per cent chance of rain.
This will be the 55th launch for SpaceX this year. The company's reusable Falcon 9 rocket has a very high success rate.
This is the UAE's first Moon mission, with more rovers to be developed in the future.
The Rashid rover has been built by engineers from the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre.
A core team of 11 are behind the mission’s development and have been working on it since 2017.
It has been named in honour of the late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed, the former Ruler of Dubai, and the father of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Vice President and Ruler of Dubai.
Ispace will attempt to land the mission in the Atlas crater in the Mare Frigoris site, located in the far-north of the Moon’s near side.
The Rashid rover will spend one lunar day exploring the area, capturing scientific data and images.
It will study the properties of lunar soil, the petrography and geology of the Moon, dust movement, and study surface plasma conditions and the Moon's photoelectron sheath.
Lunar dust, or regolith, is one of the main challenges astronauts face on the Moon.
It was during the Apollo missions that scientists learnt how lunar dust stuck to spacesuits, causing erosion and operational problems.
The launch on Wednesday will be streamed live by SpaceX.
That Japanese mission is failed now
 

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