IRNSS, Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System

Does India need it's own GPS system


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Singh

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Please discuss IRNSS here.

India to build a constellation of 7 navigation satellites by 2012​

The Indian satellites will be placed at a higher so-called geostationary orbit to have a larger signal footprint and lower number of satellites to map the region

Bangalore: India will invest Rs1,600 crore to build a constellation of seven satellites for navigation in the subcontinent, joining countries such as the US, China and Russia that have their own systems that help in accurately giving directions for vehicles and aircraft.
The Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, the Indian version of NAVSTAR, the US-run global positioning system, is expected to be functional by 2012.
The Indian Space Research Organisation or Isro, the country’s space agency, is building the satellites, the first of which is to be launched in 2010 on a homegrown Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle. It will be used for surveying, telecommunications, transport, identifying disaster areas and public safety among others functions.
The Indian satellites will be placed at a higher so-called geostationary orbit to have a larger signal footprint and lower number of satellites to map the region.
“We need only a minimum number of satellites. Seven satellites will do this job,” said Madhavan Nair, secretary, department of space, and chairman, Isro.
The geostationary orbit is the space 36,000km above earth where communication satellites are parked to transmit signals.
“If you want to have a global coverage, we have to have a constellation of nearly 24 satellites which have to be going around all over the world at around 20,000km above the earth,” said Nair. NAVSTAR, originally designed for the US military, has a constellation of 24 medium earth observation satellites, orbiting around 20,200km in space.
While India’s plans are regional, China, the European Union and Russia are building systems that are as big as the US network to link every part of the globe.
India will launch three satellites of Glonass, the Russian satellite navigation system, which is partially operational, that will eventually see around two dozen satellites covering the globe by 2009.
The European Union’s satellite navigation system, Galileo, will have around 30 satellites that will circle the globe for around 12 years, but the progress of the programme is uncertain after a consortium of industries backed out in June to share risk money in the €2.4 billion or Rs13,300 crore venture. The EU parliament had hinted at funding it as a public project, but a final decision will be made by November.
“The first operational satellite will be by 2012, provided we have political consensus by this fall,” said Jeremie Godet of the European Commission at a conference on Global Navigation Satellite Systems in Bangalore on Tuesday.
China is building Compass or Beidou Satellite Navigation and positioning system with around 30 medium earth observation satellites to track the entire globe, while five geostationary satellites, three of which are in orbit, will track the country locally.
The first of the 30 medium observation satellites was launched in April, but an official of the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp. said a deadline has not been set for the remaining satellites. “Our programme would cost almost the same as Galileo,” said Meng Bo, vice-president of the Chinese agency.

India to build a constellation of 7 navigation satellites by 2012 - Technology - livemint.com
 

prahladh

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Can PSLV place sats in geo-stationary orbit. (I'm assuming geo-stationary==36,000kms).
 

Payeng

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Can PSLV place sats in geo-stationary orbit. (I'm assuming geo-stationary==36,000kms).
That's why the GSLV, PSLV can only put in sun syncho. orbit. not geo. stationary.
 

prahladh

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But The article says PSLV? Hence asking
to be launched in 2010 on a homegrown Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle
 

Sridhar

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Can PSLV place sats in geo-stationary orbit. (I'm assuming geo-stationary==36,000kms).
It can put very small payloads in few 100 kgs to Geo stationary orbit , as it did for Chandrayan 1 with PSLV XL ( larger boosters ).
 

Payeng

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It can put very small payloads in few 100 kgs to Geo stationary orbit , as it did for Chandrayan 1 with PSLV XL ( larger boosters ).
That's a news for me, can it achieve 3.07 km/s velocity as it is necessary to achieve that velocity to place a satellite in that orbit.
 

Payeng

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I thought it is the cryogenic rocket motor which allow a payload to achieve that velocity.
 

plugwater

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Launch of first satellite for Indian Regional Navigation Satellite system next year

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) intends to launch the first in a constellation of seven satellites envisaged for the ambitious Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) project, GPS' Indian counterpart, by the end of next year.

“The subsystems [of the satellite] are under various stages of fabrication at ISRO's centres. At least four such satellites [each with a life in excess of seven years] are required to make it operational. After launching the first satellite using a PSLV in the last quarter of 2011, periodic launches would take place every six months. Which means by 2014, we would have the IRNSS optimally functional,” said ISRO sources here.

Range of applications

IRNSS, which will have a range of applications including personal navigation, will be India's answer to the U.S.-operated GPS, Russia's Glonass, European Space Agency's under-development Galileo, and China's emerging constellation, Compass.

“The problem with the existing constellations is that they are controlled by defence agencies in those countries. While Galileo is a pay-to-use system, Compass is military-controlled. On completion, IRNSS will have all-weather, round-the-clock coverage over the Indian landmass with an extended coverage of about 1,500 km around it,” said the sources.

Meanwhile, the GPS-Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) payload in GSAT-4 which would be placed into the geosynchronous transfer orbit — before the satellite self-adjusts into its geostationary orbital home at 82 degree east longitude — by the eagerly-awaited April 15 flight of GSLV-D3 with indigenous cryogenic upper stage will provide a position accuracy of better than 7.6 metres required for precision landing of civilian aircraft.

The navigational payload, operating in C, L1 and L5 bands, will form the space segment of GAGAN Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS). “We are planning the launch of GSAT-8, with another GAGAN payload, by this year-end. A third satellite, GSLV 8 or 9, with GAGAN payload would also be launched in succession,” the sources said.

Independent function

GAGAN and IRNSS, once it comes into being, will function independent of each other. The ground segment of GAGAN comprises Indian Reference Stations (INRES) Indian Master Control Centre (INMCC) at Kundanhalli, near Bangalore, and Indian Land Uplink Stations (INLUS). ISRO has already set up eight such reference stations at eight Indian airports in collaboration with Airports Authority of India during the technology demonstration phase of GAGAN and 14 more are in the pipeline.

GAGAN's user segment consists of SBAS receivers capable of receiving GPS signals and corrections from geostationary satellite.

“Data from INRES is transmitted to INMCC. This data is processed by INMCC and sent to INLUS. INLUS transmits the corrected GPS information and time synchronisation signal to a geostationary satellite. It then transmits a GPS-like signal with an accuracy of the order of 3 metre horizontal and 4 metre vertical [which can be accessed by GPS SBAS receivers],” explained an ISRO media hand-out.

http://beta.thehindu.com/sci-tech/article393892.ece
 

plugwater

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Navigation System by ISRO

Indian Space Research Organisation is developing its own navigation system called Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS). The IRNSS will have a constellation of 7 satellites and complementary ground infrastructure. The IRNSS system is planned to be made operational by end of 2014. Government has approved the IRNSS project at a total cost of Rs. 1420.00 crores in May 2006 for both space and ground infrastructure.

This Information was given by Sh.Prithviraj Chavan, Minister of State for Science & Technology & Earth Sciences, PMO, Personnel, Public Grievances & Pensions & Parliamentary Affairs in reply to a written question in Lok Sabha today.

http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=64569
 
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India to have own satellite navigation system by 2015

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...gation-system-by-2015/articleshow/7475912.cms

BANGALORE: India will launch seven satellites in the next four to six years to develop its own version of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for enhancing surveillance capabilities and improving accuracy of its weapon systems.

The Indian Navigation System (INS) satellites would provide coverage over India's areas of interest for military purposes along with its civilian uses, IAF sources said in Bangalore.

Till now, India is dependent on the American GPS and has signed a deal with Russia for using their GLONAS system but having an indigenous system would guarantee the availability of system during crisis or conflicts.

Asked about similar developments in the neighbourhood, they said China was developing its own version of the GPS which will cover the whole globe.

"But we don't want to cover the whole world and want to focus on the region important for us," the sources said.

The system is also likely to be used for other purposes like telecommunications, transport, identifying disaster areas and public safety among others.

The satellites will be placed at a higher geostationary orbit to have a larger signal footprint and lower number of satellites to map the region, they said.

The GPS system is available for civilian uses only.
 

nitesh

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Everything is falling in place, the nirbhay is about to test fired (or it done already?), the necessary system to guide this baby to right place is coming online. For F INSAS our soldiers will need accurate coords, hmm. This decade is going to be interesting
 

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why is isro not considering a global satellite navigational system like gps,glonass,beidou etc?
 

SHASH2K2

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Everything is falling in place, the nirbhay is about to test fired (or it done already?), the necessary system to guide this baby to right place is coming online. For F INSAS our soldiers will need accurate coords, hmm. This decade is going to be interesting
Sir I think its only for commercial purpose and USA is actively helping us with this . For military use we will be using Glonass .
 

sandeepdg

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Sir I think its only for commercial purpose and USA is actively helping us with this . For military use we will be using Glonass .
Eventually, the GLONASS will be replaced by the INS. More than the commercial purpose, its being launched has more to do with defense purpose.
 

SHASH2K2

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Eventually, the GLONASS will be replaced by the INS. More than the commercial purpose, its being launched has more to do with defense purpose.
This system will not be covering entire earth and will use only 5-6 satellites. It will be mainly used for commercial purpose. In future we may decide to expand it but as of now its purely civilian project . Thats the reason USA is assisting in this project.
 

sandeepdg

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This system will not be covering entire earth and will use only 5-6 satellites. It will be mainly used for commercial purpose. In future we may decide to expand it but as of now its purely civilian project . Thats the reason USA is assisting in this project.
Our immediate security concerns are in our vicinity only. We don't need to cover the entire earth as of now. Remember that the commercial usage is more dependent on systems giving entire earth coverage, hence the GPS is most widely used today. Whereas, the INS will have more of an strategic use besides the commercial use.

Note these lines from the article above:

"The Indian Navigation System (INS) satellites would provide coverage over India's areas of interest for military purposes along with its civilian uses, IAF sources said in Bangalore.

Till now, India is dependent on the American GPS and has signed a deal with Russia for using their GLONAS system but having an indigenous system would guarantee the availability of system during crisis or conflicts.

"But we don't want to cover the whole world and want to focus on the region important for us."

We are already using the GPS for our military requirements. Its widely used by the IN, IAF and IA. And not only us, almost the whole world's defense forces use the GPS in some form or other.
 

Tshering22

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Our immediate security concerns are in our vicinity only. We don't need to cover the entire earth as of now. Remember that the commercial usage is more dependent on systems giving entire earth coverage, hence the GPS is most widely used today. Whereas, the INS will have more of an strategic use besides the commercial use.

Note these lines from the article above:

"The Indian Navigation System (INS) satellites would provide coverage over India's areas of interest for military purposes along with its civilian uses, IAF sources said in Bangalore.

Till now, India is dependent on the American GPS and has signed a deal with Russia for using their GLONAS system but having an indigenous system would guarantee the availability of system during crisis or conflicts.

"But we don't want to cover the whole world and want to focus on the region important for us."

We are already using the GPS for our military requirements. Its widely used by the IN, IAF and IA. And not only us, almost the whole world's defense forces use the GPS in some form or other.
Agreed. But now we should do something to coordinate the signals of INS and GLONASS in such a way that there is no confusion for our forces. Indigenous is the best but considering that Russia indirectly shares the "Middle Kingdom" threat with us in its far east (Not that its a threat for them, but a worry) I don't see any reason why Russians would cut GLONASS signal ever especially since we are part financiers of this project.

Till INS is ready, GLONASS should be used to integrate IAF, IA and SFC since they are the ones who are most likely to be the first to face the fire than Navy which will only be on armed patrol to keep any nosy Dragon ships out.
 

nitesh

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Sir I think its only for commercial purpose and USA is actively helping us with this . For military use we will be using Glonass .
GAGAN is for commercial purpose, there is GLONASS running in parallel, we are looking for collaborating with Europe also, but there is one more program called IRNSS which will take care of regional navigation, consists of 7 satellites. :)
 

nitesh

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Tarmak007 -- A bold blog on Indian defence: SAPTHA UPAGRAHA: IRNSS constellation will make India a supreme space power: ISRO | Multi-pronged results assured: Radhakrishnan

Bangalore: It's Mission Saptha Upagraha and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) says all on track. The Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) is a constellation of seven satellites and the ISRO seems to have pooled the best space stars from various work centers for the project. Shrugging out of the current crisis and sticking as one unit chanting the 'Mission Matters-mantra' spelt-out by its chief K Radhakrishnan, the prestigious mission promises to make India an independent space power.
Scheduled for a launch this year, three satellites are expected to be placed in the Geostationary Orbit (GEO) at 32.5°E, 83°E & 131.5°E and two satellites each will be placed in the Geosynchronous Orbit (GSO) with equatorial crossing at 55°E and 111.5°E and at an inclination of 29° to the equator. Two spare satellites are also planned as part of the mission. The IRNSS would provide two services, with the Standard Positioning Service (SPS) open for civilian use and the Restricted Service (RS) -- an encrypted one – for authorized users (military).
The spacecraft configuration has been finalized and the satellites of the constellation are being configured identically with each weighing 1425 kg. First flight model structure has been ready for assembly and integration. Design reviews of major sub-systems of IRNSS satellites like spacecraft structure, thermal control systems, propulsion systems, power system, telemetry tracking and control, deployment mechanisms, pyrotechnic devices, composite elements, check out and integration have been completed. The spacecraft is basically configured with I-1K Bus to be compatible for launch onboard PSLV.
All the payload subsystems and atomic clock units are under various stages of realisation, with the Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and the ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore playing the lead role. Civil works of Satellite Control Facility at Hassan is in progress. Four 7.2m antennas and one 11m antenna have been installed so far. The civil works for the IRNSS Navigation Centre at Byalalu and the Factory Acceptance Test for IRNSS Network Timing (IRNWT) elements have also been completed.
A detailed design review with participation of ISRO and other Indian agencies are in progress with the hardware, software-related elements being put under the scanner.
ADVANTAGE INDIA: The current global positioning systems (GPS) are provided by non-civilian departments of other countries and are not guaranteed to be available 24x7. In order to remove the dependency on such systems, India hit upon the IRNSS idea, which provides the position, navigation and timing (PNT) services, independent of other global and regional navigation systems. Post-IRNSS launch, India need not dependent upon on other navigation systems. The project sanctioned in June 2006 with a budget of Rs 1420 crore has four core centres, including the ISAC (Bangalore), SAC (Ahmedabad), ISRO Telemetry Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC), Bangalore and Master Control Facility (MCF), Hassan.
"The IRNSS project is significant to Department of Space and ISRO and will be vital for India too. It is emerging as an important space application area not only for civil aviation but in many other areas such as mobile telephones, surface transport, intelligent highway system, maritime transport, rail, oil and gas, precision agriculture, fisheries, survey and marine engineering, science, electricity networks and leisure," ISRO Chairman K Radhakrishnan told Express.
 

nitesh

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Business Line : Industry & Economy / Economy : ISRO sets ball rolling for Indian 'GPS' / navigation system

The space agency along with its other government partners on Wednesday briefed 250 current and potential users, planners, industry and scientists on the uses of navigational systems. The Airports Authority of India co-sponsored the first Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) meet. ISRO's Director, Publicity and PR, Mr S.Satish, said GPS signals and position data received in the country are often wide of the mark. "When we have our own IRNSS, it will be equal to, if not better than, the GPS."

An ISRO release said, "The regional navigational satellite system over the Indian region will provide the user a position accuracy that is better than 20 meters on a 24/7 all-weather basis."
Mr A.S.Ganeshan, Project Director, Navigation Systems, ISAC, presented the ISRO-AAI GAGAN project and the IRNSS. The users were told about the use of navigational signals for accurate positioning - as in civil aviation, transportation and other services.

GAGAN is a joint project of ISRO and AAI to augment or fine-tune the not-too-accurate GPS data obtained from the US. It will mainly benefit airlines over the country's airspace. GSAT-8, the first satellite carrying GAGAN payload or antenna, has been beaming signals since December 15, 2011.
 

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