Irish Militant Nationalism Resurfacing Again

pmaitra

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
33,267
Likes
19,516
My opinion, and not a humble one:

It is long overdue that the Irish Nationalists evicted the Brits, specifically the English, from their land.
 

W.G.Ewald

Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2
Professional
Joined
Sep 28, 2011
Messages
14,139
Likes
8,577
Sinn Fein members holding portraits of the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising march across the Liffey River bridge in Dublin. Picture: AP/John Cogill
The portrait on the far left may be Michael Collins, but I can't make that out from the photo.

Michael Collins (Irish leader) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Collins, like many of the other participants, was arrested, almost executed[13] and was imprisoned up at Frongoch internment camp. Collins became one of the leading figures in the post-rising Sinn Féin, a small nationalist party which the British government and the Irish media wrongly blamed for the Rising. It was quickly infiltrated by participants in the Rising, so as to capitalise on the "notoriety" the movement had gained through British attacks. By October 1917, Collins had risen to become a member of the executive of Sinn Féin and director of organisation of the Irish Volunteers; Éamon de Valera was president of both organisations.[14]
 

pmaitra

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
33,267
Likes
19,516
^^

Michael Collins parted his hair on his right. The portrait has it on the left.

Again, not sure and it is a portrait.

Maybe he parted his hair both ways?

 

W.G.Ewald

Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2
Professional
Joined
Sep 28, 2011
Messages
14,139
Likes
8,577
My opinion, and not a humble one:

It is long overdue that the Irish Nationalists evicted the Brits, specifically the English, from their land.
Read this.

Northern Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Citizenship and identity

Several studies and surveys performed between 1971 and 2006 have indicated that, in general, Protestants in Northern Ireland see themselves primarily as British, whereas Roman Catholics regard themselves primarily as Irish.[33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40] This does not however account for the complex identities within Northern Ireland, given that many of the population regard themselves as "Ulster" or "Northern Irish", either as a primary or secondary identity.

A 2008 survey found that 57% of Protestants described themselves as British, while 32% identified as Northern Irish, 6% as Ulster and 4% as Irish. Compared to a similar survey carried out in 1998, this shows a fall in the percentage of Protestants identifying as British and Ulster, and a rise in those identifying as Northern Irish. The 2008 survey found that 61% of Catholics described themselves as Irish, with 25% identifying as Northern Irish, 8% as British and 1% as Ulster. These figures were largely unchanged from the 1998 results.[41][42]

People born in Northern Ireland are, with some exceptions, deemed by UK law to be citizens of the United Kingdom. They are also, with similar exceptions, entitled to be citizens of Ireland. This entitlement was reaffirmed in the 1998 Good Friday Agreement between the British and Irish governments, which provides that:

"...it is the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and be accepted as Irish or British, or both, as they may so choose, and accordingly [the two governments] confirm that their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship is accepted by both Governments and would not be affected by any future change in the status of Northern Ireland.

As a result of the Agreement, the Constitution of the Republic of Ireland was amended. The current wording provides that people born in Northern Ireland are entitled to be Irish citizens on the same basis as people from any other part of the island of Ireland.[43]

Neither government, however, extends its citizenship to all persons born in Northern Ireland. Both governments exclude some people born in Northern Ireland, in particular persons born without one parent who is a British or Irish citizen. The Irish restriction was given effect by the Twenty-seventh amendment to the Irish Constitution in 2004. The position in UK nationality law is that most of those born in Northern Ireland are UK nationals, whether or not they so choose. Renunciation of British citizenship requires the payment of a fee, currently £229.[44]
 

pmaitra

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
33,267
Likes
19,516
People born in Northern Ireland are, with some exceptions, deemed by UK law to be citizens of the United Kingdom.
UK law on Irish land should be ultra vires and ex judicio, and is enfored only by virtue of British occupation of part of Ireland.

As a result of the Agreement, the Constitution of the Republic of Ireland was amended. The current wording provides that people born in Northern Ireland are entitled to be Irish citizens on the same basis as people from any other part of the island of Ireland.[43]
I find this the most reasonable of all the paragraphs.
 

The Messiah

Bow Before Me!
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
10,810
Likes
4,613
My opinion, and not a humble one:

It is long overdue that the Irish Nationalists evicted the Brits, specifically the English, from their land.
Agreed.

Ive always had a soft spot for the irish (not the treacherous northern ones...they're migrants from england/scotland anyways.)
 

civfanatic

Retired
Ambassador
Joined
Sep 8, 2009
Messages
4,561
Likes
2,559
Unlike India, Ireland never recovered from the famines of the 19th century, whose effects were greatly exacerbated by British exploitation (just as they were in India).

Ireland's population fell from 8 million to 4 million as a result, and has never recovered since.

They have a very good reason to be "serious" about their history. The worst crimes of the English were committed closer to home, rather than in the colonies.
 

civfanatic

Retired
Ambassador
Joined
Sep 8, 2009
Messages
4,561
Likes
2,559
Here is a graph showing the change in Irish population following their conquest by the British.



One wonders if the British attempted to effect similar results in India through their deliberate engineering of famines.
 

W.G.Ewald

Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2
Professional
Joined
Sep 28, 2011
Messages
14,139
Likes
8,577
Agreed.

Ive always had a soft spot for the irish (not the treacherous northern ones...they're migrants from england/scotland anyways.)
Scotch-Irish American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Scotch-Irish (or Scots-Irish) Americans are the descendants of an estimated 250,000 Presbyterian and other Protestant dissenters from the Irish province of Ulster who immigrated to North America primarily during the colonial era.[2] Scholars often include the 150,000 Ulster Protestants who immigrated to America during the early 19th century, and their descendants, such as the families of President Woodrow Wilson[3] and banker Andrew Mellon[4]. Most of the Scotch-Irish were descended from Scottish and English families who colonized Ireland during the Plantation of Ulster in the 17th century.[5] While an estimated 36 million Americans (12% of the total population) reported Irish ancestry in 2006, and 6 million (2% of the population) reported Scottish ancestry,[6] an additional 5.4 million (1.8% of the population) identified more specifically with Scotch-Irish ancestry. People in Great Britain or Ireland that are of a similar ancestry usually refer to themselves as Ulster Scots, with the term Scotch-Irish used only in North America.[7]
 

LurkerBaba

Super Mod
Joined
Jul 2, 2010
Messages
7,740
Likes
6,923
Country flag
^
The Plantation of Ulster is quite interesting, I can find parallels in the subcontinent

From the mid-16th and into the early 17th century, crown governments carried out a policy of colonisation known as Plantations. Scottish and English Protestants were sent as colonists to the provinces of Munster, Ulster and the counties of Laois and Offaly (see also Plantations of Ireland). The largest of these projects, the Plantation of Ulster, had settled up to 80,000 English and Scots in the north of Ireland by 1641. The so-called Ulster Scots were predominantly Presbyterian, which distinguished them from the Anglican English colonists.
 

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,763
I saw th trailer of the film Michael Collins.

Rather powerful!
 

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,763
WG,

What is the connection between the Scots and the Irish?

There are a lot of Irish in Scot Regiments.
 

Latest Replies

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top