Indo-Myanmar Relations

ant80

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India-Mayanmar Relations: Tamanthi and 600MW Shwazaye project

China pushes India to the brink on Myanmar project
NEW DELHI: Fed up with Myanmar government's inflexibility under Chinese influence and 'sarkari' attitude of state-run hydel utility NHPC, India's ambassador has suggested that exiting a strategic initiative to deepen New Delhi's influence in the region -- the 1,200 mw Tamanthi hydel project -- may be the best option to save India's image.

The plan for the Tamanthi and 600 mw Shwazaye projects was drawn up in 2006 under a 2004 cooperation agreement between the two countries. Both the projects were to be built on Chinwin river for supplying power to Myanmar and bordering states in India's north-east to kickstart economic development in the region.

In a letter to foreign secretary Nirupama Rao, ambassador V S Seshadri has suggested a rethink on continuing with the Tamanthi project. His reason is that things are not working in India's favour even after election of a new government, which is "seeking longer periods for clearances".

On top of it, lack of any initiative, flexibility in tying up a local partner or planning from NHPC is making any progress more difficult by the day. It has an uneasy relationship with Myanmar's Department of Hydropower Planning, is slow in replying to letters, goofs up on procedure for applying for clearances and has no high-level contacts with local officials.

The net result is that India's image is taking a beating. Delays in the project's progress are reinforcing local perception of Indian companies being incapable of completing projects in a time-bound fashion. Though the project is sure to go a Chinese firm if India opts out, Seshadri hints an exit may be the best way to cut India's losses.

The best way forward is to ask how important is the project for India's strategic interest or to economic development of northeast. "If the answer is we will not be seriously affected, then we should, without further loss of time, exit the project in as smooth a manner as possible rather than expending further diplomatic capital on seeking clearances etc... the delay is affecting our image and is seen as confirming local (mis)perceptions about Indian companies," Seshadri said.

But if the government feels the project is important for India's strategic interests, then NHPC will have to give up its "business as usual approach" and get into "mission mode", Seshadri said. "They will need to work to change perceptions here that it can run time-bound project in the Myanmar environment.

There is, however, a third option: Completing additional investigations quickly and then considering whether to continue with it or not. But even for this, NHPC will have to pull up its socks, Seshadri said.
Just read this on toi.

edit: Unfortunately, our political tardiness has come to bite us in the rear in this project.
 
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satish007

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play with Myanmar Gov. is not a good idea, this Gov. is so bad reputation that almost all countries don't like it, US even want to invade it to save their people. anyone will loss outweighs the gain there.
 
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nrj

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[h=3]Myanmar largest Indian aid recipient after Afghanistan[/h]
by Ajai Shukla
Business Standard, 15th Oct 11


China's smaller neighbours have long been wary of the imposing proximity of the Middle Kingdom. In 1946, when Vietnamese resistance leaders considered Chinese help in throwing off the French colonial yoke, Ho Chi Minh believed China was the greater threat. Dismissing the suggestion, the canny Vietnamese leader famously declared, "The last time the Chinese came (to Vietnam), they stayed a thousand years"¦ I prefer to sniff French dung for another five years than to eat Chinese dung for the rest of my life."


Myanmar's president, Thein Sein, currently on a groundbreaking visit to India, is hardly immune to such fears. With his authoritarian regime driven by a global deep-freeze into Beijing's sweaty embrace, the growing Chinese presence in Myanmar, looms uncomfortably large especially in the northern region that borders China's Yunnan province. Myanmar's decision-makers in their purpose-built capital, Naypyidaw, have begun balancing that unequal relationship. After a year of bold internal liberal reforms, Thein Sein is reaching out to the international mainstream beyond ASEAN. His springboard is New Delhi, which maintained relations with Myanmar in the face of international pressure, including criticism from Barack Obama in a speech to India's parliament last November.


India's forbearance has been vindicated. Over the last year, Myanmar's civilian (but military-controlled) government has liberalised the media, eased controls over the internet, and begun releasing political prisoners. On Tuesday, a government-appointed human rights body --- a novel concept in Myanmar --- publicly called for the release of "prisoners of conscience". In a move towards reconciliation, dialogue has begun with the face of democracy in Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi.


All this increases India's comfort in hosting President Thein Sein; the joint statement issued after his meeting with India's prime minister today welcomed Myanmar's "progress in moving towards an open and democratic framework." Also gratifying to India would be Myanmar's decision last month (in response to domestic opposition) to suspend work on a $3.6 billion hydroelectric dam that was to supply power to China. Beijing insists that the differences will be settled, but this is a jolt to China's ambitious infrastructure ambitions in Myanmar, including a corridor of roads, railways and pipelines linking Yunnan, in China, to Kyauk Phyu port in the Bay of Bengal.


India, meanwhile, is stepping up its role in building Myanmar's infrastructure. During talks in New Delhi today, India granted Myanmar more than $800 million worth of lines of credit for infrastructure projects, including "railways, transport, power transmission lines, oil refinery, OFC link, etc." A major Indian thrust is emerging in the development of Myanmar's agriculture sector, including irrigation projects. Myanmar is emerging as the biggest recipient of Indian development aid after Afghanistan, where India has committed $2 billion.


This is a positive new direction to New Delhi's engagement with Naypyidaw, which has often been hamstrung by issues relating to insurgencies in India's northeast. Four Indian states --- Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur and Mizoram --- share a 1,643-kilometre land border with Myanmar's Kachin and Chin states and Sagaing division. After their independence, India and Burma ("Myanmar" came into usage only in 1989) agreed to continue the British tradition of allowing border tribes to move and trade freely within a 40-kilometre belt on either side of the border. But the Naga insurgency ended that; with Naga militants transiting through Burma to and from training camps in China's Yunnan province, New Delhi unilaterally imposed a permit system in 1968.


In 1994, as relations warmed after a quarter century of chill, New Delhi and Yangon signed the Indo-Myanmar Border Trade Agreement. This allowed for a Land Customs Station (LCS) at Moreh, in Manipur, which permits three forms of trade. Residents of the 40-kilometre border belt can barter locally produced goods worth up to US $1,000, with a simplified documentation system. Secondly, barter trade is permitted in 22 items up to a value of $20,000, provided the traders have an Importer Exporter Certificate (IEC) from the DGFT. Thirdly, any Indian trader can export goods to Myanmar through LCS, Moreh as regular export in accordance with the Foreign Trade Policy.


Today both countries agreed to expand that commerce. Another LCS will be established between the two countries. A "Trade and Investment Forum", incorporating businessmen from both countries, will "expand the basket of goods under border trade, [and arrange the] visit of an Indian banking delegation to Myanmar to facilitate better trade and payment arrangements, etc."


As Myanmar opens up to India, New Delhi's immediate challenge is to win over politically alienated factions in its own northeastern states, which threaten to play spoiler in physically connecting India with Myanmar. Access to the Moreh LCS in Manipur is controlled by a multitude of Kuki and Naga tribal factions, with National Highway 39 --- running through Nagaland and Manipur --- blockaded for months at a stretch. In the circumstances, ambitious Indo-Myanmar projects like the Kaladan Multi-Modal Transit Project, which seeks to connect Myanmar's Sittwe Port with India's northeastern states like Mizoram, will remain hostage to internal conflicts within India.


President Thein Sein, who began his three-day state visit to India on Wednesday with homage at Buddhist shrines in Sarnath, Kushinagar and Gaya, is accompanied by practically his entire cabinet and the Chief of General Staff in the Ministry of Defence. He returns to Myanmar tomorrow after a morning visit to the Indian Agricultural Research Institute.

Broadsword
 

SHASH2K2

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play with Myanmar Gov. is not a good idea, this Gov. is so bad reputation that almost all countries don't like it, US even want to invade it to save their people. anyone will loss outweighs the gain there.
I guess PRC doesn't listen to your sane ideas. We are just trying to counter chinese interference in Myanmar.
 

nrj

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President Thein Sein, who began his three-day state visit to India on Wednesday with homage at Buddhist shrines in Sarnath, Kushinagar and Gaya, is accompanied by practically his entire cabinet and the Chief of General Staff in the Ministry of Defence.
Talks for itself about importance of this visit.
 

Galaxy

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Myanmar largest Indian aid recipient after Afghanistan

Myanmar largest Indian aid recipient after Afghanistan



by Ajai Shukla
Business Standard, 15th Oct 11


China's smaller neighbours have long been wary of the imposing proximity of the Middle Kingdom. In 1946, when Vietnamese resistance leaders considered Chinese help in throwing off the French colonial yoke, Ho Chi Minh believed China was the greater threat. Dismissing the suggestion, the canny Vietnamese leader famously declared, "The last time the Chinese came (to Vietnam), they stayed a thousand years"¦ I prefer to sniff French dung for another five years than to eat Chinese dung for the rest of my life."

Myanmar's president, Thein Sein, currently on a groundbreaking visit to India, is hardly immune to such fears. With his authoritarian regime driven by a global deep-freeze into Beijing's sweaty embrace, the growing Chinese presence in Myanmar, looms uncomfortably large especially in the northern region that borders China's Yunnan province. Myanmar's decision-makers in their purpose-built capital, Naypyidaw, have begun balancing that unequal relationship. After a year of bold internal liberal reforms, Thein Sein is reaching out to the international mainstream beyond ASEAN. His springboard is New Delhi, which maintained relations with Myanmar in the face of international pressure, including criticism from Barack Obama in a speech to India's parliament last November.

India's forbearance has been vindicated. Over the last year, Myanmar's civilian (but military-controlled) government has liberalised the media, eased controls over the internet, and begun releasing political prisoners. On Tuesday, a government-appointed human rights body --- a novel concept in Myanmar --- publicly called for the release of "prisoners of conscience". In a move towards reconciliation, dialogue has begun with the face of democracy in Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi.

All this increases India's comfort in hosting President Thein Sein; the joint statement issued after his meeting with India's prime minister today welcomed Myanmar's "progress in moving towards an open and democratic framework." Also gratifying to India would be Myanmar's decision last month (in response to domestic opposition) to suspend work on a $3.6 billion hydroelectric dam that was to supply power to China. Beijing insists that the differences will be settled, but this is a jolt to China's ambitious infrastructure ambitions in Myanmar, including a corridor of roads, railways and pipelines linking Yunnan, in China, to Kyauk Phyu port in the Bay of Bengal.

India, meanwhile, is stepping up its role in building Myanmar's infrastructure. During talks in New Delhi today, India granted Myanmar more than $800 million worth of lines of credit for infrastructure projects, including "railways, transport, power transmission lines, oil refinery, OFC link, etc." A major Indian thrust is emerging in the development of Myanmar's agriculture sector, including irrigation projects. Myanmar is emerging as the biggest recipient of Indian development aid after Afghanistan, where India has committed $2 billion.

This is a positive new direction to New Delhi's engagement with Naypyidaw, which has often been hamstrung by issues relating to insurgencies in India's northeast. Four Indian states --- Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur and Mizoram --- share a 1,643-kilometre land border with Myanmar's Kachin and Chin states and Sagaing division. After their independence, India and Burma ("Myanmar" came into usage only in 1989) agreed to continue the British tradition of allowing border tribes to move and trade freely within a 40-kilometre belt on either side of the border. But the Naga insurgency ended that; with Naga militants transiting through Burma to and from training camps in China's Yunnan province, New Delhi unilaterally imposed a permit system in 1968.

In 1994, as relations warmed after a quarter century of chill, New Delhi and Yangon signed the Indo-Myanmar Border Trade Agreement. This allowed for a Land Customs Station (LCS) at Moreh, in Manipur, which permits three forms of trade. Residents of the 40-kilometre border belt can barter locally produced goods worth up to US $1,000, with a simplified documentation system. Secondly, barter trade is permitted in 22 items up to a value of $20,000, provided the traders have an Importer Exporter Certificate (IEC) from the DGFT. Thirdly, any Indian trader can export goods to Myanmar through LCS, Moreh as regular export in accordance with the Foreign Trade Policy.

Today both countries agreed to expand that commerce. Another LCS will be established between the two countries. A "Trade and Investment Forum", incorporating businessmen from both countries, will "expand the basket of goods under border trade, [and arrange the] visit of an Indian banking delegation to Myanmar to facilitate better trade and payment arrangements, etc."

As Myanmar opens up to India, New Delhi's immediate challenge is to win over politically alienated factions in its own northeastern states, which threaten to play spoiler in physically connecting India with Myanmar. Access to the Moreh LCS in Manipur is controlled by a multitude of Kuki and Naga tribal factions, with National Highway 39 --- running through Nagaland and Manipur --- blockaded for months at a stretch. In the circumstances, ambitious Indo-Myanmar projects like the Kaladan Multi-Modal Transit Project, which seeks to connect Myanmar's Sittwe Port with India's northeastern states like Mizoram, will remain hostage to internal conflicts within India.

President Thein Sein, who began his three-day state visit to India on Wednesday with homage at Buddhist shrines in Sarnath, Kushinagar and Gaya, is accompanied by practically his entire cabinet and the Chief of General Staff in the Ministry of Defence. He returns to Myanmar tomorrow after a morning visit to the Indian Agricultural Research Institute.

Broadsword: Myanmar largest Indian aid recipient after Afghanistan
 

Ray

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A good move by the Govt of India.

It appears that there is some movement towards looking into Indian requirements before worrying about the world.

First, it was Bangladesh.

Then, Afghanistan and Karzai's visit.

And now, Myanmar.
 

Galaxy

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Thein Sein Indian Visit - October 2011

Thein Sein Indian Visit - October 2011


Before I begin, I like to quote one of the best quotes from an Indian babu - Harshvardhan Shringala - Joint Secretary External Affairs.

"The last thing you want to do is wag your finger at a country publicly,Try doing that with your children, let alone a fellow nation."

If you casually browse through a spate of articles written about Burma written out in the Wild Wild West, a common thread you are bound to notice is that Burma is changing. The change that is talked about is Burma becoming more "democratic". There are noises about a national reconciliation. West and India are definitely concerned about China, so every attempt is made by them to wean Burma away from China. It is easier said than done.



Rumors are that India will play a key role in influencing American and Europe ease sanctions on Burma.

Dr Singh's most influential advisers suggested New Delhi could play a key role in "encouraging the U.S and Europe to begin dismantling their long-standing policy of isolating and sanctioning Burma."

One more rumor reiterating the above point of India playing an important role.

What Thein Sein presumably wants, apart from increased trade, is for Delhi to bang the drum for the dropping of sanctions against his country – a message that sounds much better to Western ears coming from democratic India than it does coming from authoritarian China. The Indians swiftly obliged, with external affairs ministry spokesman Vishnu Prakash speaking of India's 'distaste for sanctions (which) do not serve the desired purpose.' India can now be expected to crank up the volume on its pro-Burma arguments and to start telling the United States and Europe especially to annul sanctions.

India is giving the middle finger to China, sort of. Why? Well President of Vietnam - Truong Tan Sang, President of Burma - Thein Sein and Prime Minister of Nepal - Baburam Bhattrai are visiting India in October 2011. Vietnam stands solid behind India, so I think. One has to consider this against the backdrop of Burma suspending the construction of China backed Myitsone dam project on upper Irrawaddy river.



After landing in India with a 69 member delegation, Sein went on a pilgrimage visiting Gaya and Sarnath. He also dashed to Kushinagar - the place associated with Buddha's nirvana. He is slated to visit Aakashardham temple in New Delhi on Friday. India owes a lot to Buddha, for it is because of him South East Asia will have a soft corner for India.


Thein Sein with his wife Daw Khin Khin Win at Mahabodhi Temple in Gaya.



Times of India reports India is deepening economic ties with Burma. In 2010-11 the bilateral trade stood at $1.071 billion with Burma and India's exports at $876.91 million and $194.92 million respectively.

India on Thursday declared its intent to deepen economic engagement with Yangon by setting 2013-14 as the deadline for completing Sittwe port. It is a landmark project that will act as a trade gateway for India's north-eastern states to Southeast Asia.

Expressing Yangon's keenness to expand ties with India across the spectrum, 13 senior ministers handling key portfolios are accompanying Thein Sein to India. Several pacts in areas related to economy and infrastructure development are expected to be signed after the talks.

This is how far Sittwe port is from Kolkota. The distance to Kolkota through the Silguri corridor from the Seven Sister states is 932 miles, and it takes over a week through the Himalayan roads. The work on Sittwe port is to give the North Eastern Indian States an access to the ocean.



Some noteworthy agreements and deals:
  • India hasextended $500 million credit.
  • Pact to upgrade Yangon Children's Hospital and Sittwe General Hospital.
  • Programme of Cooperation in Science and Technology for the period of 2012-2015
  • Burma reiterated that its soil would not be used for anti-India activities. Manmohan Singh and Thein Sein agreed on enhancing effective cooperation and coordination between the security forces to thwart terrorist activities and counter insurgencies.
  • The leaders agreed to improve the cooperation in Oil and Gas exploration. Essentially Burma will encourage Indian private and public companies to invest in the energy sectors.
  • Burma expresses interest to reopen Stilwell Road.
  • Bilateral trade target set to $3billion by 2015.

Thein Sein inspecting Guard of Honour

Source


 

niceguy2011

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Myanmar's goverment new paper told about friendship with China from sunday till now ,every single day.
" nobody can break up our friendship..." their news paper said. LOL

Myanmar r good boy too.
 
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amitkriit

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Myanmar's goverment new paper told about friendship with China from sunday till now ,every single day.
" nobody can break up our friendship..." their news paper said. LOL

Myanmar r good boy too.
Emotions and Geo-Politics aren't compatible, so either Myanmar is nothing more than "good boy" or Myanmar is a true nation having good diplomats. Afghanistan keeps telling the world how Pakistan is their "Conjoined Twin".
 

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Myanmar, India ink accord to curb insurgency, trafficking

NAY PYI TAW: Myanmar and India signed an agreement here to prevent insurgency and curb human trafficking through the border areas of the two neighbouring countries, a media report said on Saturday. According to a memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed here Friday, the two countries would take measures to bring in peace and stability in the border regions, Xinhua reported. The MoU also called for exchange of information and coordination between their armed forces for border security to check illegal trespassing. Myanmar's deputy minister of Defence Major General Kyaw Nyunt and India's ambassador to Myanmar Gautam Mukhopadhaya signed the agreement. India had earlier suspended the construction of an integrated check post (ICP). Teams from both sides carried out land surveys of the area. In 2013, Myanmar objected to India's construction of the ICP near the border. Myanmar signed a demarcation agreement with India in March 1967. However, due to differences over the location of border pillars in Bamaw valley, several border markings have not yet been established.

Myanmar, India ink accord to curb insurgency, trafficking - The Times of India
 

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New Delhi: India is rushing relief supplies, including 10,000 packets of noodles, to Myanmar which was hit by massive floods. "On the request of the government of Myanmar, India has rushed relief supplies to Myanmar which has seen heavy flooding due to rain in the past few days," a Home Ministry statement said. In terms of immediate response, India has arranged 100 tonnes of rice, 10,000 packets of noodles and 10 tonnes of medicines like chlorine tablets, anti-diarrhoeal tablets and other life-saving drugs. Three aircraft carrying relief supplies will take off tomorrow morning and provide them to Manadlay and Kaleli in Myanmar, it said. Floods and landslides in Myanmar have claimed at least 46 lives and affected some 2,15,000 people. Tens of thousands of people remain cut off and swollen rivers are now threatening to inundate low-lying southern areas of the country.
India to dispatch relief materials to flood-hit Myanmar



 

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A C-17 Globemaster III aircraft of IAF with relief supplies lands at Mandalay, Myanmar.
 
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