Indians who sided with invaders against their own

pmaitra

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Something that has been on my mind from an earlier conversation on a different thread. Let's post articles and opinions of figures in history who betrayed Indians and sided with outsiders (particularly Britshers and Muslims).


@OneGrimPilgrim @Razor @Krusty @pmaitra
Interesting thread. Thanks for opening. I will comment later. I hope people get along in this thread as it can be incendiary in content. :)
 

pmaitra

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@mendosa Posting this inline if you don't mind, I think it adds to the thread.

Why lakhs of Indians celebrate the British victory over the Maratha Peshwas every New Year
Five hundred Mahar soldiers scattered the 25,000-strong Peshwa army for the East India Company in Koregaon near Pune in 1818.

Mridula Chari
Mridula Chari

An hour after New Year struck on Friday, two retired army officers, PS Dhoble and Dadasaheb Bhosle, set out in a bus from the tomb of Independence-era leader BR Ambedkar in Mumbai's Dadar area. Accompanying them in the convoy were more 300 other uniformed men and women.

Five hours later, they reached their destination: a large village just past Pune called Bhima Koregaon. It was here, on the banks of the Bhima river, that a ragtag group of Mahar soldiers fighting under the British flag in 1818 defeated the vastly superior forces of the Peshwa. More than 150 years later, evidence of the battle is still apparent. Residents of Bhima Koregaon say they find swords from the battle in the river bed even today.

Bhosle recounted with pride the story of how 500 Mahar soldiers on foot launched a heroic attack against the 25,000-strong army of the Peshwas, staffed with mounted soldiers armed with guns

“Bigod, humne Peshwe ko khatm kiye,” Bhosle said. “The Mahars only ended Peshwa rule and gave India to the British.”

This might seem an unusual sentiment for an officer who has several medals on his chest in recognition of his services to the nation. Bhosle served in the 1965 war, in Sri Lanka, in the Andamans and Jammu and Kashmir.

Yet the Battle of Koregaon has a deep significance to Mahars and other Dalits in India, who remember it every January 1 as a mark of their triumph against the dehumanising rule of the Peshwas and as the first step in their ongoing struggle against caste-based oppression.


Subedar Major PJ Kamble (retired) of the Mahar Regiment visits the Bhima Koregaon victory pillar with his son. Credit: Mridula Chari
A heroic rout

As the story goes, on New Year's Day in 1818, about 500 soldiers of the East India Company's Bombay Native Infantry regiment led by Colonel FF Staunton waded across the Bhima river and, at Bhima Koregaon, routed a superior force of 25,000 well-equipped soldiers of the Peshwa.

There is some room for exaggeration. Contemporary English accounts, for instance, mention 900 Mahar soldiers instead of 500, and 20,000 Peshwa soldiers not 25,000. Besides, the Peshwas were already on the back foot by the time of this battle – the East India Company had taken Pune, the Peshwa’s capital, some months before and had raised its flag at the palace at Shanivarwada.

Whatever the figures, though, the battle was one of great odds. The British viewed it as the clinching episode in the third Anglo-Maratha war, which ended with the Peshwas being forced to cede control of the Maratha Empire to the East India Company. This set the foundation for British rule in western India.

Although the first Maratha ruler, Shivaji, freely recruited Mahars in his army, two centuries later, by the time of the Peshwas, the status of Mahars was lower than ever. The Peshwas were Brahmins of a particularly orthodox bent. Stories told even today recall how when Mahars entered towns, they were made to tie brooms behind their backs to sweep up the dust of their footprints and to tie pots in front on their necks to collect their spittle. It was also a criminal offence to hide one’s caste.

Dalit recountings of the battle emphasise that when the English were approaching, Mahars offered their services to Peshwa Bajirao II. It was only when he rejected them yet again that they switched their loyalty to the British instead.

In 1851, the British erected a memorial pillar at Bhima Koregaon, with the names of those who had died in the battle. Most of the names are of Mahar soldiers.


Crowds gather at the pillar. Credit: Mridula Chari
Escape from oppression

Despite the long military history of the Mahars, the British government stopped recruiting them into their army in 1893. This was a consequence of the Indian uprising of 1857, after which the British reassessed their recruiting strategies to include only those from “martial races” in the army. Also excluded at the same time were the “effeminate peoples of the south” and “the so-called Mahrattas of Bombay”.

While all groups removed from the army reacted with dismay, the blow to Mahars, considered to be untouchable in caste Hindu society, was keenly felt. With their loss of position in the army, Mahars also lost a chance for education and to work in an environment that was at least on paper non-discriminatory.

Bhimrao Ambedkar himself spent his early years shielded from the violence of untouchability in a military cantonment in Mhow, where his father, Subedar Major Ramji Sakpal, was posted.

Sakpal was the headmaster of the military school there that educated children and relatives of military personnel. He retired in 1894, a year after the British stopped recruiting Mahars to the army. Even after his retirement, Sakpal continued to lend his support to different campaigns to reinstitute the Mahar Infantry Batallion.

On January 1, 1927, Ambedkar led a commemoration at the pillar just outside the village. The ceremony continues today – people come to the pillar, lay flowers at its base and then move on to the other amusements on offer at the 11-acre ground owned by the military.


Credit: Mridula Chari
At the ground

The British began to recruit Mahars again during the First World War, but disbanded the regiment after the war was over. Finally in 1945, the Mahar Regiment was permanently reformed. Both Dhoble and Bhosle are members of that regiment, which is now based in Sagar, Madhya Pradesh, not Mhow. Every year, members of the Mahar Regiment, in and out of uniform, come to the pillar to pay their respects.

The two veterans, Dhoble and Bhosle, became trainers of the Samata Sainik Dal after their retirement in the early 1990s. The paramilitary organisation affiliated to the Buddhist Society of India, was established by Ambedkar in 1926, partly in response to the growing militarisation of Hindus in the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh.

“There are layers of memory surrounding the memorial,” said Shraddha Kumbhojkar, a historian at the University of Pune. “There is the battle of Koregaon, which was forgotten in immediate history. Then Dr Ambedkar visited it in 1927, which added a pilgrimage value to it. After his demise, it became a part of an attempt to create an alternate culture to mainstream Hindu culture.”


Most visitors spend only an hour or two at the ground, moving on to be replaced by more. Credit: Mridula Chari


Remembering valour

The functions at Bhima Koregaon have similarities to other Ambedkar commemorations. Three large tents in the centre of the ground served as the base for a series of political parties to give speeches, for musicians performing stirring songs about the history of Bhima Koregaon and for visitors to simply take shelter from the unusually sharp heat this year.

Outside the tents was the usual array of people selling books on caste, CDs (though fewer people buy them every year now that Whatsapp and Youtube have cornered the music market), statues of Ambedkar and Buddha, posters and calendars.


A woman browses at a book vendor. Photo credit: Mridula Chari
Also present were vendors of sweets, fruit, juice and snacks who are regulars at any fair. They knew their market. In the field adjoining the Bhima Koregaon ground was another mela complete with giant wheel, slides and whirling carousels. But compared to its neighbour, it was almost-deserted. Just beyond both were quiet fields of lush sugarcane that had not yet been cut for this year.

Just before noon, the distant whir of a helicopter’s blades became audible. As everyone instinctively looked up, the chopper flew past the pillar and let streams of flowers rain down on it. Cheers went up from the crowd. The helicopter flew past four more times. Each time, it was greeted with loud approval.


Play
The helicopter was an advertising move for the Lashkar-e-Bhima, an up-and-coming Dalit-oriented political party based in Maharashtra.

Scaling up

They certainly got widespread exposure. This year, at least one lakh people are estimated to have visited the site to pay their respects. Until even a decade ago, old-timers say, though the commemorations were regular they were not very well attended.

This, said Bhausaheb Bhalerao, husband of the sarpanch of Bhima Koregaon, was due to the efforts of the Bhima Koregaon Ranstambh Seva Samiti. The committee has 11 organising members from the village itself and 500 volunteers who come from all parts of Maharashtra. Most of these volunteers are relatives of the committee members.


Bhausaheb Bhalerao, resident of Bhima Koregaon. Photo Credit: Mridula Chari
Together, they regulate crowd flow, create organised paths for movement, have water and food supplies on standby for people who have travelled great distances and set up tents for more organised activities.

“Ten years ago, there was not much of a crowd here,” Bhalerao said. “There were perhaps 50,000 who came in a day. Now there must be at least four lakh people.”

The pillar also seems to have inspired at least 15 people to have joined the army, though there have been fewer recruits in recent times. Bhalerao’s son, for instance, wants to join the police.

Bhalerao’s brother, now deceased, formed the committee in 2005, on seeing how much travellers suffered inconveniences every year. The gram panchayat itself contributed Rs 50,000 to ceremonies this year, while individual members contributed more on their own.

“Though we started in 2005, we got a grip only by 2010,” Bhalerao said. “Next year, we hope to make this even better.”

Making memories

“This year everything is much better organised than the last time I came,” confirmed Durpatabai Ghorge, 80, who had travelled overnight from Nanded to visit the memorial. Her last visit was 10 years ago, at which point, she said, there were far fewer people visiting.

Gayatai Kokre, 61, who organised Ghorge’s and 107 other women’s travel from Nanded district, was dismissive of the massive presence of various Dalit parties at the memorial.

“We don’t want to be associated with any greedy political party,” she said. “We are happy with the progress of the Dalit community, but we are angry with the parties so will leave them. Remembering the valour of the Mahar soldiers is a matter of pride for us and those soldiers are an inspiration to women to take our lives into our own hands.”

She spoke of how they sang songs all night as they travelled.

“We came by railway and every one of us has a ticket,” she said, taking out papers from her blouse as evidence. “We will not travel free on government services. Nobody can ever say this of us.”

Kokre was perhaps conscious of aspersions cast on Dalits whenever they congregate in large numbers, whether in Mumbai, Nagpur, Mahad or Bhima Koregaon.

Shraddha Kumbhojkar, the Pune university historian, in a paper on how people of different identities view the Bhima Koregaon memorial, noted that caste Hindus from Pune, which is only 50 km from the village, only make it a point not to travel by that road on New Year’s Day.

“Every New Year day, the urban middle classes who use the highway remind each other to avoid the stretch that passes by the memorial with the warning that ‘those people will be swarming their site at Koregaon’,” she wrote.

That does not diminish its importance to those involved in the struggle against caste.

Said Bhikkuni Purnima, a Buddhist nun who had travelled all the way from Delhi to attend ceremonies, “I am a Buddhist who believes in peace, but we come here to give respect to those who sacrificed their lives for their society and for self-respect.”
OT: Our late Brigadier Ray Sir was from the Mahar Regiment.
 

AnantS

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Traitors or not! I cant still fathom why Marathas after joint campaign with Sikhs, handed over Punjab's governership to Afghani(one version is they could not agree on distribution of spoils of war)! What had happened about to their slogan about establish Hindu swarajya in India and driving yavanas out?

I would say, some strategic and tactical foolish actions done in past were no less than treachery!
 

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Traitors or not! I cant still fathom why Marathas after joint campaign with Sikhs, handed over Punjab's governership to Afghani(one version is they could not agree on distribution of spoils of war)! What had happened about to their slogan about establish Hindu swarajya in India and driving yavanas out?

I would say, some strategic and tactical foolish actions done in past were no less than treachery!
Weren't we Punjabis regarded as Malleccha due to foreign mixing in blood by some other Indians?
 

AnantS

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Weren't we Punjabis regarded as Malleccha due to foreign mixing in blood by some other Indians?
Doubt that or rather I would admit I dont know. It would be laughable even if such claims were made about "mixing of blood". Common Hindus/Sikhs rarely "mixed" with outsiders. Violators within their community were shunned. Case in point Do you know Ranjit Singh was given Tankhaiya by clergy at GT because he was seen frolicking with a muslim concubine on an elephant in public at Amritsar(or Lahore ... dont remember)
 

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meh
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Doubt that or rather I would admit I dont know. It would be laughable even if such claims were made about "mixing of blood". Common Hindus/Sikhs rarely "mixed" with outsiders. Violators within their community were shunned. Case in point Do you know Ranjit Singh was given Tankhaiya by clergy at GT because he was seen frolicking with a muslim concubine on an elephant in public at Amritsar(or Lahore ... dont remember)
Yes, that was a time when the Akalis (Nihang Singhs) ruled the Takht. And their ferociousness against outsiders would put the most hardcore RSS/Shiv Sena or any other Hindu organization to shame. After the Singh Sabha in the 1920s they were kicked out of the panth or rather sidelined by the Tatt Khalsa Singhs who rule the panth today and they pander to Muslims because of a false belief of similarity due to monotheism.

Anyway, your example is relevant because it is near the time period of the Marathas. I was thinking of a much earlier time period.. Punjabis (Jatts, upper caste Hindus) have intermixed Caucasian and NE European blood in their DNA and I read in a book (albeit it was written by a Britisher so I don't trust it) that they were treated as malleccha at some point in history.
 

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Yes, that was a time when the Akalis (Nihang Singhs) ruled the Takht. And their ferociousness against outsiders would put the most hardcore RSS/Shiv Sena or any other Hindu organization to shame. After the Singh Sabha in the 1920s they were kicked out of the panth or rather sidelined by the Tatt Khalsa Singhs who rule the panth today and they pander to Muslims because of a false belief of similarity due to monotheism.

Anyway, your example is relevant because it is near the time period of the Marathas. I was thinking of a much earlier time period.. Punjabis (Jatts, upper caste Hindus) have intermixed Caucasian and NE European blood in their DNA and I read in a book (albeit it was written by a Britisher so I don't trust it) that they were treated as malleccha at some point in history.
Ummm again I doubt. See PD why? Because its only after Iron age, caste became rigid Hindu society. It became rigid to preserve indigenous culture and bloodlines, as after that period there was a lot of migrations to India from other parts of world. Kasmiris are mostly Indo scythians converted enmasse to Budhism under Kanishka and later Hinduism.

I dont trust Brits on any racial theories. Late studies indicate current Indians are mostly mixture of two ancient groups. ANI(Ancient North Indians ) and ASI(Ancient South Indians)
 

ashdoc

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Traitors or not! I cant still fathom why Marathas after joint campaign with Sikhs, handed over Punjab's governership to Afghani(one version is they could not agree on distribution of spoils of war)! What had happened about to their slogan about establish Hindu swarajya in India and driving yavanas out?

I would say, some strategic and tactical foolish actions done in past were no less than treachery!
adina beg was the maratha governor of punjab . he was a punjabi muslim not afghan .

the marathas wanted someone who could make the punjab expedition profitable for them . adina beg was the only one who promised to hand over 75 lakh rupees per month to the marathas if he was given governorship of punjab . the sikhs promised much less and the revenue the sikhs promised was not enough to satisfy maratha appetite .

after peshwa bajirao's death his son nanasaheb became peshwa . he was not as committed to the hindu cause like bajirao or shivaji and marathas began to extort money from north south and east indians even though they all were hindus . he was ready to sell governorship of punjab to the highest bidder even though that person was muslim .
 
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Here is the reference for our original conversation. I will try to dig up more from the source mentioned by Dahiya (Pargitar) but keep it for another thread.

It is significant that they are called 'Mlecchas'. This is a ready-made test for identifying these people. If they are called 'Mlecchas' or 'Sudras', or Vrishla Asuras-then it is a sure bet that the people named are 'foreigners' and most probably Jats from Central Asia (cf Mauryas). It is the direct result of the "arrogance", noted by Pargitar, which termed all the Punjabis as Mlecchas or Sudras.

Jats, the Ancient Rulers: A Clan Study
Bhim Singh Dahiya

 

AnantS

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Here is the reference for our original conversation. I will try to dig up more from the source mentioned by Dahiya (Pargitar) but keep it for another thread.

It is significant that they are called 'Mlecchas'. This is a ready-made test for identifying these people. If they are called 'Mlecchas' or 'Sudras', or Vrishla Asuras-then it is a sure bet that the people named are 'foreigners' and most probably Jats from Central Asia (cf Mauryas). It is the direct result of the "arrogance", noted by Pargitar, which termed all the Punjabis as Mlecchas or Sudras.

Jats, the Ancient Rulers: A Clan Study
Bhim Singh Dahiya
Seems like more of guess work as its based on (british) premises that Jats were from Central Asia. Even if Jats are of Indo Scythians/Saka origin, their origin is mostly cited to be in Xinjiang region(which itself was known to host various Indo European tribes). Then Sakas have been living in India much before Mauryas. Gautam Budha had Saka origin. He was known as Shakya Muni. So Sakas getting discriminated as mlechas is doubtful but up for another discussion in another thread.

Mlecchas was used for any outside invader/immigrants. Case in point, when British came, they were called mallechas, the high caste did not share utensils with them, their used utensils were kept separate & outside from rest of household utensils. If I remember reading literature, earlier in that era(preceding Maurya) people were not happy from fleeing refugee population from Iran, due to onslaught of advancing Alexander Army. Kushans/Greeks/Mixed progenies were looked down upon. if I remember correctly long back, I read in tribune an article about Magh tribe in Haryana( I found that article http://www.tribuneindia.com/2000/20000520/windows/main4.htm... ). You will find interesting that these people are still (wrongly)looked down upon by localites.
But I disgress. Last post on this topic by me on this thread.
 

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Doubt that or rather I would admit I dont know. It would be laughable even if such claims were made about "mixing of blood". Common Hindus/Sikhs rarely "mixed" with outsiders. Violators within their community were shunned. Case in point Do you know Ranjit Singh was given Tankhaiya by clergy at GT because he was seen frolicking with a muslim concubine on an elephant in public at Amritsar(or Lahore ... dont remember)
He was not pronounced a Tankhaiya that effectively means ex-communicated from the Faith. His "Concubine" was the famed "Billo Rani".

The lore so goes, he was accused of having relations with other woman(women?), so the Sarbat Khalsa was called, and then one person announced those who wish to flog Ranjit Singh for his sin keep quiet and those who wish to not punish him should shout Jo Bole So Nihal.... :p
 

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meh
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He was not pronounced a Tankhaiya that effectively means ex-communicated from the Faith. His "Concubine" was the famed "Billo Rani".

The lore so goes, he was accused of having relations with other woman(women?), so the Sarbat Khalsa was called, and then one person announced those who wish to flog Ranjit Singh for his sin keep quiet and those who wish to not punish him should shout Jo Bole So Nihal.... :p
:) Tankhaiya just means punishment, ex-communication is a form of punishment.
 

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For those familiar with world history, well find that this is human nature and a trait going back to ages.
  • In modern times, when Nazis took over France, Vichy France was run by French Nazi collaborationists not Germans. If the Nazis had taken over Britain, undoubtedly they would have propped up their supporters such as Black shirts and Brit elite who were in favour of appeasement.
  • When Japanese colonised Taiwan, Korea, China and Manchuria, a large number of local officials were from these regions and have been interred in Yasukuni jinja as a recognition of their war efforts.
  • A large number of Black Zimbabweans fought with the Rhodesian army against ZANU and ZAPU militants during the Rhodesian bush war. Black Zimbabweans made a significant number of the most notorious Rhodesian unit- the Sealous scouts, who were alone responsible for nearly 70% of the guerilla casualties.
  • In Vietnam, French propped up Vietnamese converts to take on the administration and sowed the seeds for the eventual Vietnam conflict.
  • The British disproportionately favoured some elite Tamils in Ceylon and put them in high places in administration, education, judiciary and business. These Tamils not only ignored Sinhalese but also their own, especially the up country tea pickers who were indentured labours from India. We all saw how it turned out.
  • In the Bangladesh Liberation war , there were many Bengalis who sided with Shitistan, their descendants are the Jamaat and BNP of today.
 

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Gilani brothers, betrayed Aliya Rama Raya and switched over to the camp of the Deccan Sultans, battle of Talikota which ended the reign of one of the greatest dharmic empires, the aftermath was brutal which saw one of the most brutal genocides in human history. All Muslims of the empire turned against the Hindu citizens and indulged in bloodshed, pillage, rape. The fall of Vijayanagara must rank as one of the greatest tragedies of medieval history, Hampi burnt for 6 months, When I saw the ruins there the sadness that descended upon me can't be put into words.
 

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