Indian Navy: Pictures and Multimedia

vampyrbladez

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IMO think they are japanese. Writing on the life jackets . Though by kit they could pass as IN. (even thought M4s are not in na inventory)
@cobra commando

Wrong. They are Malaysian VBSS. Look at the shoulder flag patch on the blue helmet guy on the boat.



Indian VBSS look like this with hand me down sterlings:





This is Sagar Prahari Bal aka Naval QRT.

 

rkhanna

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I'm sure they do. Its something very common. Port Pilots and even Somali Pirates do it quite regularly.
Actually its not.

Port Pilots + Somalia pilots both either board stalled ships or ships that have (or been forced to) reduce speed . Somali pilots have known to fire RPGs towards the bridge to get captains to stop ( One of my father's ship was almost boarded once a few years ago - his compny used to employee PMCs out of Doha for escorting duties)

Boarding a ship (from its blind spot) going full speed from a fast attach craft in the dead of night is a different beast.

MARCOS DID have this capability in the 80s/90s - was just wondering out loud if the capability is still retained. Few Naval SOF units can do it.

(PS as another example- in the 80s/90s MARCOS was one of the few Naval SOF units that could an open (blue) water Para jump with a full combat load. Today alot more SOF could do it, but 2 decades ago there were only a handful.
 

armyofhind

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Actually its not.

Port Pilots + Somalia pilots both either board stalled ships or ships that have (or been forced to) reduce speed . Somali pilots have known to fire RPGs towards the bridge to get captains to stop ( One of my father's ship was almost boarded once a few years ago - his compny used to employee PMCs out of Doha for escorting duties)

Boarding a ship (from its blind spot) going full speed from a fast attach craft in the dead of night is a different beast.

MARCOS DID have this capability in the 80s/90s - was just wondering out loud if the capability is still retained. Few Naval SOF units can do it.

(PS as another example- in the 80s/90s MARCOS was one of the few Naval SOF units that could an open (blue) water Para jump with a full combat load. Today alot more SOF could do it, but 2 decades ago there were only a handful.
Not really.
Boarding a ship from its blind spot isnt really an option because the only true blind spot is the stern, and for a ship underway, boarding it from the stern is impossible due to the propeller wash.
boarding can be done either from the port or starboard quarter, or from the port or starboard beam, which is the shipside.

Port Pilots do board at reduced speeds but the reduction in speed isnt much when compared to the full ahead sea speed, probably a difference of only two or three knots if its a tanker.
This is because port pilots generally board before entry into the port channel, and any ship cannot be slowed down a lot at that point because it will be blocking other traffic into the port otherwise.

Somali Pilots fire at the bridge in order to disorient and suppress the nav crew, so they do not maneuvre a lot. In practice, no ship will ever slow down while transiting through pirate infested waters.. the general objective is to maintain as high a speed as possible. Anyway, it isnt really possible to slow down a ship just by changing the engine settings that fast, because ship engines take a long time to reduce rpm, because of their huge size.


The first ship I served on, was a VLCC oil tanker and we used to do a regular sudan to china route, transiting through the Pirated waters every voyage.
There was an attempt to board in the second voyage, where the skinnies came in on two boats with aluminium ladders fixed with grappling hooks at the end. And they actually did come that close that I could see inside their boats on binoculars.
We too had a security team onboard, 3 of them, one ex South African SF, and two ex Indian Army with experience in RR. By this time these guys had already taken positions on the bridge wings, and the South African fired a few warning shots in the air. The captain had made a mayday call and a Royal Navy ship patrolling the IRTC had dispatched a SeaKing which came overhead and buzzed them once.
Thats when the skinnies decided it wasnt worth the risk and waved off.

My point being that Somalis do try to board ships at full speed with makeshift equipment. Anyway, for a loaded tanker, the max speed it'll be doing in the water is 13 knots, which around 26kmph.... with a freeboard(height above the waterline till the main deck) of around 5 to 6 meters.
If they can do it, I'm sure supremely fit Naval Special Forces soldiers with gas powered grappels and ascenders can surely do it.

The challenge increases manifold though, if its a container ship doing 24 knots and freeboard of 12 to 14 meters.
Thats why container vessels are almost impervious to these pirates.
 

rkhanna

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Not really.
Boarding a ship from its blind spot isnt really an option because the only true blind spot is the stern, and for a ship underway, boarding it from the stern is impossible due to the propeller wash.
boarding can be done either from the port or starboard quarter, or from the port or starboard beam, which is the shipside.

Port Pilots do board at reduced speeds but the reduction in speed isnt much when compared to the full ahead sea speed, probably a difference of only two or three knots if its a tanker.
This is because port pilots generally board before entry into the port channel, and any ship cannot be slowed down a lot at that point because it will be blocking other traffic into the port otherwise.

Somali Pilots fire at the bridge in order to disorient and suppress the nav crew, so they do not maneuvre a lot. In practice, no ship will ever slow down while transiting through pirate infested waters.. the general objective is to maintain as high a speed as possible. Anyway, it isnt really possible to slow down a ship just by changing the engine settings that fast, because ship engines take a long time to reduce rpm, because of their huge size.


The first ship I served on, was a VLCC oil tanker and we used to do a regular sudan to china route, transiting through the Pirated waters every voyage.
There was an attempt to board in the second voyage, where the skinnies came in on two boats with aluminium ladders fixed with grappling hooks at the end. And they actually did come that close that I could see inside their boats on binoculars.
We too had a security team onboard, 3 of them, one ex South African SF, and two ex Indian Army with experience in RR. By this time these guys had already taken positions on the bridge wings, and the South African fired a few warning shots in the air. The captain had made a mayday call and a Royal Navy ship patrolling the IRTC had dispatched a SeaKing which came overhead and buzzed them once.
Thats when the skinnies decided it wasnt worth the risk and waved off.

My point being that Somalis do try to board ships at full speed with makeshift equipment. Anyway, for a loaded tanker, the max speed it'll be doing in the water is 13 knots, which around 26kmph.... with a freeboard(height above the waterline till the main deck) of around 5 to 6 meters.
If they can do it, I'm sure supremely fit Naval Special Forces soldiers with gas powered grappels and ascenders can surely do it.

The challenge increases manifold though, if its a container ship doing 24 knots and freeboard of 12 to 14 meters.
Thats why container vessels are almost impervious to these pirates.
Most grateful for the detailed explanation.
 

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