Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

samsaptaka

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Make In India: Indian And Turkish Shipyards Close Contract For Building FSS Ships For The Indian Navy
As was first reported by Financial Express Online in 2019, the Turkish Shipyard was L1 and had technically qualified for the FSS project for the Indian Navy. In fact, it was down-selected from among three companies who had made the cut earlier.



Who All Were In The Race?


In the initial stage, seven global companies had responded to the Request for Proposal (RFP) and these included Italy based Fincantieri, Navantia from Spain, Rosoboronexport (ROE) from Russia, the German ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS), and Turkey’s Anadolu Shipyard. The RFP was for the construction of five ships under the FSS project and was estimated to be at a cost of $2.3 billion.



At the end of talks and negotiations, only three companies were shortlisted and these were TKMS, ROE and Turkey’s Anadolu Shipyard.



The contract between the two shipyards was inked after the detailed analysis was done of the technical and financial aspect. There were a series of discussions related to price and ensured that all requirements were met before the contract was inked between the two yards recently.



This is the first time at a shipyard from Turkey is participating in a defence contract in India. As has been reported by Financial Express Online, the Anadolu Shipyard is part of TAIS industrial group. And the discussions were with the shipyard and not the TAIS group.



What Will The Turkish Yard Do?


This shipyard will be giving the ship design, provide technical assistance and also supply the key machinery equipment (KME).



And, the HSL will be providing the latest technology which will include the pre-outfitting and the modular construction. Also, HSL will follow the best shipbuilding practices.

More About The Project?



All the components onboard the ships will be made locally in India and the construction of five ships of about 45,000 tons full load displacement will help in giving a fillip not only to HSL but the local small and local companies will be playing a critical role in this huge project.



Even the steel used in the shipbuilding will be from India.



The local industries of cable laying, zonal painting and blasting as well as related small scale industries will get a lot of work.
Ridiculous ! Turks are hand in gloves with chinks and pork in abetting terrorism in our country, and here we award them a defence contract ? How can we be so utterly blindly foolish ? I give up, no one can save this country of mine...
:facepalm:
 

McSnipes

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US Navy & Boeing are performing simulations of F/A-18 Super Hornet jets from a ski jump at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland.

The jets have completed over 150 flight simulations to demonstrate that the jets are STOBAR compliant & thus compatible with Indian aircraft carriers. Another important fact, the Indian Navy has not paid the US Navy or Boeing to conduct these simulations.
 

mist_consecutive

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US Navy & Boeing are performing simulations of F/A-18 Super Hornet jets from a ski jump at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland.

The jets have completed over 150 flight simulations to demonstrate that the jets are STOBAR compliant & thus compatible with Indian aircraft carriers. Another important fact, the Indian Navy has not paid the US Navy or Boeing to conduct these simulations.
Any source of the news?

Why will the USA try to land/takeoff from our only carrier which is already small and cramped when they have multiple supercarriers they can park anywhere?
 

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McSnipes

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Any source of the news?

Why will the USA try to land/takeoff from our only carrier which is already small and cramped when they have multiple supercarriers they can park anywhere?
They aren't doing the simulations because they plan to use Indian carriers, it's to show that Super Hornets are viable for India. IN needs more fighters in the near future.

Regarding source, there will be a press release soon.
 

Assassin 2.0

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INS Karanj, the third submarine of the Calvary class being made in India, is expected to join the Navy in four to five months. Karanja was sent for sea trials in 2018 and according to sources these tests have been successful. The fourth submarine of the same class, INS Vela, will also join the Navy by the end of next year. The first two submarines of the Kalvari class, Kalvari and Khanderi, have already joined the Navy. A total of 6 submarines of Kalvari class are being manufactured at Mazgaon Dock Limited, Mumbai. These submarines can stay in the sea for 50 days and can travel up to 12000 km at a time. It has 8 officers and 35 naval personnel and can dive up to 350 meters under the sea. Submarines of the Kalvari class can move at 37 kmph under the sea. These include torpedoes to destroy a submarine inside the sea or a ship on the ocean surface. Apart from this, they can also lay landmines in the sea. The Indian Navy had made a major plan in 1997 to make Submarine fleet stronger. Under this, there was a plan to make new 24 submarines by 2024, but this plan is still running behind schedule. Kalvari has joined the Navy in 2017 as the first submarine under the class ie Project 75. The project is expected to be completed by 2022. Project 75 (India) of a more modern submarine equipped with air independent propulsion is expected to start soon. Tender for this project is coming out soon. Apart from these 12 submarines, India has plans to make 12 nuclear submarines. Currently, the Indian Navy has 9 Indus Class, 3 in Shishumar class, 2 in Kalvari class and one nuclear submarine INS Chakra i.e. 14 submarines in total. Apart from these, there are two submarines of the Arihant class ie INS Arihant and INS Arighat which are nuclear ballistic submarines. Apart from nuclear submarine, all submarines of the Indian Navy are diesel-electric and due to lack of air independent propulsion, they have to surface every one or two days. Posted in India Search Bar Categories Asia Broadcast Europe Exclusive India My Take N & S America News Beat Copyright © idrw.org 2006-2019. All Rights Reserved.Fair Use idrw.org

idrw.org .Read more at India No 1 Defence News Website https://idrw.org/indigenous-submari...trength-of-indian-navy-will-soon-be-inducted/ .
 

WolfPack86

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India reduces demand for 57 carrier based jets
India is now looking to reduce the number of Multi-Role carrier borne fighters jets it wants to source from foreign manufacturers.


The numbers could be cut down from the present demand of 57 jets. According to some estimates, the Indian Navy could settle for just 36 jets, or two squadrons. A formal projection will be made to the Department of Military Affairs, which was created in the Indian Ministry of Defence in January 2020.


Russian MiG 29K, procured in 2011, is the existing deck based fighter of the Navy on board its carrier, the INS Vikramaditya. At present there are 45 such jets and with the next carrier INS Vikrant set to be operational by 2023, more number of planes are needed.


International players like Boeing with the F/A-18 and Dassault aviation with the Rafale-M are in the race for the tender. In January 2018 the Indian Navy issued a Request for Information seeking to buy 57 deck-based fighters for an estimated cost of about 95000 crores (USD 9.5 Bn). These jets are intended use as day-and-night capable, all-weather, multi-role, deck-based combat aircraft which can be used for air defence, air-to-surface operations, buddy refuelling, reconnaissance, etc, from Indian navy aircraft carriers. Read the tender here.


Indian news paper The Hindu has reported “the Navy is looking to revise the tender for 57 carrier-based jets downwards” (read it here).


India reduced foreign planes to promote its own


A reduction in numbers has been made to accommodate the indigenously made twin-engine deck-based fighter (TEDBF) under development by the Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) which is likely to ready by 2030 and its first flight targeted for 2026.


The Naval version of the single-engined Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) successfully landed on the deck of INS Vikramaditya in January 2020 . Read it here . This led the DRDO to outline a plan to develop a twin-engine deck-based fighter using the LCA experience.

The new TEDBF may have technologies which the Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA) being made for the Indian Air Force may have.


The Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA), a wing of the DRDO, has been tasked for developing a twin engine made-in-India fighter jet for the carrier operations. The development phase is expected to cost about Rs 8,000 crore ( approx $ 1.3 billion). The decision was taken at the ADA’s Annual General Body meet in May this year which was chaired by Defence Minister Rajnath Singh. This is aimed at being self-reliant or “Atmanirbhar” , as its said in Hindi Language, by cutting down on defence imports.


At least three variations of the design of the TEDBF, are being studied presently using the most modern aidsto arrive at the optimum shape of the fighter which could carry a clutch of air to air missiles. The Ministry of Defence has okayed 248 pieces of the new indigenous missile Astra for the MiG 29K (read It here)


The status of the 57 jets tender


The Navy is evaluating the responses to the Request For Information (RFI) including crucially compatibility with Indian carriers that use a ski-jump for Short Take-Off but Arrested Recovery (STOBAR) launch operations.


US-based Boeing’s F/A-18 Block III Super Hornet is in the race for 57 deck-based fighters along with Dassault Aviation’s Rafale. Boeing had claimed that it had carried out the necessary tweaks (read it here) to allow the fighter to take-off using a Ski-Jump. The F/A-18 Block III, was designed to operate from U.S. flattops using a catapult assisted take-off but arrested recovery (CATOBAR) aircraft launch system, which allows for the deployment of far heavier and better armed fighter jets than the STOBAR launch system.


The existing 45 jets, MiG 29K, are enough for just the INS Vikramaditya. The INS Vikrant — the second aircraft carrier – is now expected to join the Navy by 2023 because of the delays caused by the pandemic and hurdles in procurement aviation equipment from Russia. A third carrier is in the drawing board. Officials said the second carrier is inducted there would not have enough fighters to operate from two carriers to maintain required level of deterrence.

Meanwhile China is adding numbers


The decision comes at a time when tensions between India-China is spilling over from the Himalayas into the maritime domain and both sides are preparing to be engaged in a long stare-down competition for supremacy in the Indian-Ocean region and Asia.


The People’s Liberation Army (Navy) has been rapidly ramping up its capabilities especially its carrier fleet. The PLAN is building a third carrier which resembles US super carriers and uses Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch Systems (EMALS) like the USS Ford while its first two carriers use a ski-jump like the Indian carriers which reduces the payload carried by the deck-based fighters.


A US department of Defence report: ‘Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China 2019’ says “The new carrier (Shandong) is a modified version of the Liaoning but is similarly limited in its capabilities due to its lack of a catapult launch system and has a smaller flight deck than the deck on U.S. carriers.” Read it here

China’s next generation of carriers, including one that began construction in 2018, will have greater endurance and a catapult launch system capable of supporting additional fighter jets, launching various types of fixed-wing aircraft, including early warning and antisubmarine warfare (ASW) aircraft and more rapid flight operations.. These improvements would increase the striking power of a potential carrier battle group when deployed to areas beyond China’s immediate periphery. Read detail IDD perspective on Asian carrier


Japan ordered latest deck based fighters



Japan has moved a step closer to operating an aircraft carrier of its own, ending almost a 70 years self-imposed restraint. The US has okayed the sale of 42 of the F-35B Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft produced by Lockheed Martin, under a $ 23.11 Billion deal that includes another 63 conventional F35 jets.Read details here

Last year, in 2019, Japan announced its plans to have fighter jets on its existing ‘flat-decks’, the Izumo class helicopter carriers. The ships are being modified for the same. In the past 12 months, the Indo-Pacific has seen interesting developments on ‘carriers’. Japan and China have literally ‘changed gears’ to accelerate the ‘Asian aircraft carrier race’. India and Korea are the other two Asian countries which are seen part of this ‘race’ and have carriers, or are making one.
 

WolfPack86

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Minesweepers Elusive, Indian Navy Scouts Underwater Mine-Disposal Bots
The Indian Navy is looking to acquire 10 autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) geared to detect and actively destroy underwater mines and similar threats. The requirement, published last month, is the latest iteration of a long standing — and so far fruitless — quest for long endurance surveillance AUVs. In this latest quest, the navy’s Special Operations & Diving Directorate has said it is looking for AUVs that are two-man portable, designed for surveillance, identification and explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) at harbour and at sea.



The navy’s request for information (RFI) says it is looking for AUVs that upon identifying mines or underwater improvised explosive devices (IEDs), can then be remotely commanded to fire an explosive shaped charge to detonate and destroy the object. The control console for the AUV, as is standard for such products, needs to be deployable on a rigid inflatable boat, with a 3-km radius of operations.



The threat to harbours has been pronounced for years, and amplified by the Indian Navy’s much larger — and ludicrously meandering — quest for minesweeper ships. A fruitless 15 year effort to acquire a desperately needed dozen mine countermeasure vessels (MCMVs) has hit wall after wall, with an exasperated Indian Navy down to its final pair of ships capable of clearing mines. Last heard, the navy had decided to loosen requirements to make way for a larger competition. While the EOD AUV is a far smaller procurement thrust, it is an unignorable reminder of the Indian Navy’s chronic lack of success in acquiring mine countermeasure assets.



While the new AUV RFI doesn’t restrict responses, Indian industry has unveiled a number of AUV products over the last few years. Apart from DRDO’s AUV offering that’s seen various tests by the Indian Navy, but remains in development, L&T has frequently showcased a family of AUVs (Adamya and Amogh), while IIT Bombay has an active AUV development and proving program called Matsya with sponsors that include the DRDO and American firm Teledyne Technologies. The latter firm is the maker of the GAVIA AUV, a product that has been fielded in the past in NATO underwater EOD exercises in Iceland.

The Indian Navy’s present requirement likely stems from interactions with the US Navy. Since 2016 the Indian Navy has had a first hand look at how the US Navy deploys AUVs in the underwater EOD role at Malabar exercises. Seen in these pictures below from the Malabar 2016 exercise, US Navy personnel are seen using an AUV and a Teledyne VLBV ROV in an EOD demonstration.



Capability soon with Indian Navy: Here, US Navy EOD demo for Indian Navy EOD crew using an AUV at #Malabar2016. pic.twitter.com/Z5qKAekXRR

— Livefist (@livefist) June 19, 2016



The Indian Navy’s quest for AUV assets goes back years, though there have been no major additions of the capability beyond a handful of test specimens deployed across units. In 2018, for instance, the navy announced it was interested in acquiring 15 high endurance AUVs as a first step towards creating an unmanned underwater squadron on the lines of the US Navy’s UUVRON 1. You can read all about that parallel Indian Navy requirement here.



The navy sent out its first feelers for AUVs in 2010. Like several other such campaigns, acquisition priorities have meant AUVs haven’t been contracted in any real numbers. The navy does operate self-propelled underwater reusable targets (the Saab AUV-62) but doesn’t yet deploy AUVs for the crucial ISR role.



If this new attempt to acquire AUVs is seen as another capability accretion effort amidst the military standoff with China, a view of the other side helps. As Livefist reported in 2018, the Chinese military has at its disposal a slew of indigenous AUVs, including the long endurance Qianlong III and Haiyan, said to be part of its underwater ‘great wall’.

Shiv Aroor is one of India's renowned defence correspondents who has a nonpartisan approach to his reporting. He has done reporting from high conflict defence zones such as Kashmir, Sri Lanka and Libya. He is also an author who has written 3 highly acclaimed and bestselling books
 

WolfPack86

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Minesweepers Elusive, Indian Navy Scouts Underwater Mine-Disposal Bots


The Indian Navy is looking to acquire 10 autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) geared to detect and actively destroy underwater mines and similar threats. The requirement, published last month, is the latest iteration of a long standing — and so far fruitless — quest for long endurance surveillance AUVs. In this latest quest, the navy’s Special Operations & Diving Directorate has said it is looking for AUVs that are two-man portable, designed for surveillance, identification and explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) at harbour and at sea.


The navy’s request for information (RFI) says it is looking for AUVs that upon identifying mines or underwater improvised explosive devices (IEDs), can then be remotely commanded to fire an explosive shaped charge to detonate and destroy the object. The control console for the AUV, as is standard for such products, needs to be deployable on a rigid inflatable boat, with a 3-km radius of operations.


The threat to harbours has been pronounced for years, and amplified by the Indian Navy’s much larger — and ludicrously meandering — quest for minesweeper ships. A fruitless 15 year effort to acquire a desperately needed dozen mine countermeasure vessels (MCMVs) has hit wall after wall, with an exasperated Indian Navy down to its final pair of ships capable of clearing mines. Last heard, the navy had decided to loosen requirements to make way for a larger competition. While the EOD AUV is a far smaller procurement thrust, it is an unignorable reminder of the Indian Navy’s chronic lack of success in acquiring mine countermeasure assets.

While the new AUV RFI doesn’t restrict responses, Indian industry has unveiled a number of AUV products over the last few years. Apart from DRDO’s AUV offering that’s seen various tests by the Indian Navy, but remains in development, L&T has frequently showcased a family of AUVs (Adamya and Amogh), while IIT Bombay has an active AUV development and proving program called Matsya with sponsors that include the DRDO and American firm Teledyne Technologies. The latter firm is the maker of the GAVIA AUV, a product that has been fielded in the past in NATO underwater EOD exercises in Iceland.


The Indian Navy’s present requirement likely stems from interactions with the US Navy. Since 2016 the Indian Navy has had a first hand look at how the US Navy deploys AUVs in the underwater EOD role at Malabar exercises. Seen in these pictures below from the Malabar 2016 exercise, US Navy personnel are seen using an AUV and a Teledyne VLBV ROV in an EOD demonstration.

The Indian Navy’s quest for AUV assets goes back years, though there have been no major additions of the capability beyond a handful of test specimens deployed across units. In 2018, for instance, the navy announced it was interested in acquiring 15 high endurance AUVs as a first step towards creating an unmanned underwater squadron on the lines of the US Navy’s UUVRON 1. You can read all about that parallel Indian Navy requirement here.



The navy sent out its first feelers for AUVs in 2010. Like several other such campaigns, acquisition priorities have meant AUVs haven’t been contracted in any real numbers. The navy does operate self-propelled underwater reusable targets (the Saab AUV-62) but doesn’t yet deploy AUVs for the crucial ISR role.

If this new attempt to acquire AUVs is seen as another capability accretion effort amidst the military standoff with China, a view of the other side helps. As Livefist reported in 2018, the Chinese military has at its disposal a slew of indigenous AUVs, including the long endurance Qianlong III and Haiyan, said to be part of its underwater ‘great wall’.
 

Sanghibilla

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anything new on p15b's?..ins Vizag was suppossed to be delivered to navy for trials this year right?
 

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Trololo

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Wishlist for a MiG-29K upgrade for the Indian Navy:

1> Uttam AESA Radar
2> Panoramic Cockpit Displays
3> LCA Mk2's mission computer (I think its ready)
4> Bae Systems Lite HUD (ready)
5> MAWS and digital RWR (ready)
6> D-29 EW suite (ready)
7> Secure Software Defined Radio (ready)
8> Net centric capability for a pack of Mig-29Ks and an Indian AWACS or AEW (I think ready)
9> Astra Mk1 (ready)
10> Astra Mk2
11> Astra Mk3 SFDR
12> MBDA AASRAM or Astra IR
13> Spice kit (ready)
14> PG-HSLD munition
15> Garuthmaa munition (ready)
16> Garudaa munition (ready)
17> SAAW munition
18> Paveway munition (ready)
19> NGARM missile
20> RUDRAM-3 heavy air to ground munition
21> Brahmos-NG missile
22> Distributed Litening pod (Pod components distributed across aircraft but optical payload under engine nacelle similar to MiG 35. This experience will be very handy for AMCA. (big challenge but totally worth it. Frees up a hard point)
23> Removal of front pitot tube and using mini air data probes similar to other jets.
24> Improved radar altimeter
25> Terrain following radar with terrain hugging flight capability (available with M2K and Rafale, but definitely possible to do on a Mig-29K)
26> Improved RD-33MK engines with TVC capability (TVC available on RD-33 series engines)
27> External high powered jammer pods
28> Higher fuel carrying capacity
 

WolfPack86

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Goa Shipyard begins production of stealth frigates for Navy, delivery likely by 2026
Goa Shipyard Ltd on Monday commenced production of the two guided missile frigates, which are being built in collaboration with Russia’s Yantar Shipyard for the Indian Navy. GSL expects to deliver the first ship to the Navy by 2026.


Though the frigates are based on a Russian design, they will have significant indigenous content, including an Indian-built radar, sonar systems and sensors, communication suites and anti-ship BrahMos missile systems.


Initiating the production process, vice chief of naval staff, vice admiral G Ashok Kumar said that the frigates would help the Navy meet maritime challenges. India and Russia entered into a government to government agreement for four stealth frigates, with two being built in Russia and two at Goa Shipyard. The stealth frigate project is the largest contract in GSL’s history and represents a quantum leap in the shipyard’s capabilities.


“These two frigates will put GSL in a different league because this is the first time that frigates are being constructed at the yard,” said Kumar. Once completed, the two frigates will be advanced variants of the Talwar-class stealth frigates that are already in service with the Indian Navy.


“The project will provide a significant boost to the indigenous shipbuilding sector in Goa and across the nation creating employment opportunities. We are expanding our vendor base three-fold to over 1,000 entities to encourage MSME participation in the project,” said chairman and managing director of GSL B B Nagpal.
 

Cartel Boss

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They aren't doing the simulations because they plan to use Indian carriers, it's to show that Super Hornets are viable for India. IN needs more fighters in the near future.

Regarding source, there will be a press release soon.
Boeing Going All Out To Secure Contract For F-18 Super Hornets For Indian Navy

(Slightly dated. So I am not sure what the current direction is)
 

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