Indian Economy: News and Discussion

Flying Dagger

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I have a better option, cut down on sherbat completely :)
Tough choice in hot summer... Specially when Lemon prices were skyrocketing..

We can't simply avoid something which is part of day to day life but need to bring their alternatives to counter the evil things present in market.
 

Cheepek

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“Cooperative Vietnam” v/s “Competitive India”

Undeniably, the outflow of industries will be a blow to the Chinese economy. However, some Chinese experts believe that the negative impact to China would be far less if these industries relocated to Vietnam rather than India. After all, Vietnam is constrained by a small domestic market, meaning that it could only play a minor role as a processing and transhipment hub in the global electronics industry chain. Thus, China need not feel threatened by the loss of manufacturing to Vietnam, and could still treat it as an extension/spill over of China's economic space, as an expansion of the international influence of China's industrial chain.

But the feeling is quite different when it comes to India.
The South Asian giant, which is currently not quite a part of China-centric supply chain/network system but is set to maintain a higher economic growth rate than that of China for the foreseeable future, has an extended demographic dividend, a vast domestic market, an improving electronic industry chain, a more developed software and information industry, and language competencies in line with Europe and the United States. Unsurprisingly, Chinese experts see India as an imminent challenger to China’s position in the global supply chain and an adversary to be wary of.

Therefore, a popular view in China is that even though Vietnam may be a pain-point in the short term, India, which has ambitions of becoming a manufacturing great power, is a bigger threat to China in the long run.
It is within this context that China should strive to “distinguish between friend and foe” (分清敌友) between a cooperative Vietnam and a competitive India.

https://lkyspp.nus.edu.sg/cag/publi...ndia-and-the-contest-for-global-supply-chains
 

Crazywithmath

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“Cooperative Vietnam” v/s “Competitive India”

Undeniably, the outflow of industries will be a blow to the Chinese economy. However, some Chinese experts believe that the negative impact to China would be far less if these industries relocated to Vietnam rather than India. After all, Vietnam is constrained by a small domestic market, meaning that it could only play a minor role as a processing and transhipment hub in the global electronics industry chain. Thus, China need not feel threatened by the loss of manufacturing to Vietnam, and could still treat it as an extension/spill over of China's economic space, as an expansion of the international influence of China's industrial chain.

But the feeling is quite different when it comes to India.
The South Asian giant, which is currently not quite a part of China-centric supply chain/network system but is set to maintain a higher economic growth rate than that of China for the foreseeable future, has an extended demographic dividend, a vast domestic market, an improving electronic industry chain, a more developed software and information industry, and language competencies in line with Europe and the United States. Unsurprisingly, Chinese experts see India as an imminent challenger to China’s position in the global supply chain and an adversary to be wary of.

Therefore, a popular view in China is that even though Vietnam may be a pain-point in the short term, India, which has ambitions of becoming a manufacturing great power, is a bigger threat to China in the long run.
It is within this context that China should strive to “distinguish between friend and foe” (分清敌友) between a cooperative Vietnam and a competitive India.

https://lkyspp.nus.edu.sg/cag/publi...ndia-and-the-contest-for-global-supply-chains
Decent stuff; wonder why we don't get to read more of these from our own media/think tanks.
 

Cheepek

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“Cooperative Vietnam” v/s “Competitive India”

Undeniably, the outflow of industries will be a blow to the Chinese economy. However, some Chinese experts believe that the negative impact to China would be far less if these industries relocated to Vietnam rather than India. After all, Vietnam is constrained by a small domestic market, meaning that it could only play a minor role as a processing and transhipment hub in the global electronics industry chain. Thus, China need not feel threatened by the loss of manufacturing to Vietnam, and could still treat it as an extension/spill over of China's economic space, as an expansion of the international influence of China's industrial chain.

But the feeling is quite different when it comes to India.
The South Asian giant, which is currently not quite a part of China-centric supply chain/network system but is set to maintain a higher economic growth rate than that of China for the foreseeable future, has an extended demographic dividend, a vast domestic market, an improving electronic industry chain, a more developed software and information industry, and language competencies in line with Europe and the United States. Unsurprisingly, Chinese experts see India as an imminent challenger to China’s position in the global supply chain and an adversary to be wary of.

Therefore, a popular view in China is that even though Vietnam may be a pain-point in the short term, India, which has ambitions of becoming a manufacturing great power, is a bigger threat to China in the long run.
It is within this context that China should strive to “distinguish between friend and foe” (分清敌友) between a cooperative Vietnam and a competitive India.

https://lkyspp.nus.edu.sg/cag/publi...ndia-and-the-contest-for-global-supply-chains
China’s course of action?

As evident from the writings of Chinese scholars, China’s policy priority at the moment is to prevent the formation of a US-India supply chain collaboration as the engine of fourth wave of industrialization. To achieve this, the view in Beijing is that China must pull India into the existing China-centred economic circuit (US+West+China) and forge a close China-India supply chain system. By tying India closely to China through economic and trade means, Beijing plans to prevent the ‘US+West+India’ industrial model from ever coming to fruition.

But even as China wants to win over India, it does not want to bear the strategic cost for it, nor offer any tangible benefit to India in return, which in Beijing’s view, would further aid India’s rise. Instead, it has developed a two-pronged strategy towards India. On the one hand, it contends that at a time when the US is employing various resources to attract India, Beijing will use the resources at its own disposal to contain India, including the disputed border, the Russia factor, and a highly efficient propaganda machinery to sow discord between India and the US. After all, India, in its pursuit of benefitting from the US and the West, cannot let China-India relations to decline all the way to the point of a large-scale conflict.

Worryingly, the present Chinese discourse on India is, in fact, very similar to that seen in the run up to the Galwan Valley clash in June 2020. Between late 2019 and early 2020, opinions like ‘India is an opportunist’, ‘India is seeking to replace China’, and ‘China should teach India a lesson’ were all gaining currency in China. There are echoes of that discourse today, suggesting that there is a possibility of China once again stirring up trouble at the LAC or taking other punitive actions against India in the coming days. The idea is to remind India not to stray too far into the US/Western camp or else face the possibility of military conflict.

On the other hand, China continues to try lure India into a tighter embrace, economically. To compensate for the shrinking space for bilateral trade and economic exchanges due to the conflict over territory, China has been keen to use various multilateral platforms such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and the BRICS cooperation mechanism, etc., to nullify India’s decoupling tendencies, to reconstruct the China-India industrial chain and expand the fields of economic and trade cooperation between the two (including improving the quality of cross-border industrial chain financial services, promoting the signing of the China-India digital trade agreement and letting small and medium-sized enterprises become the main driving force for future bilateral economic cooperation). Most recently, the 14th BRICS Summit Beijing Declaration gave primacy to enhancing cooperation on supply chains, trade and investment flows, the role of MSMEs, and growing the digital economy partnership among the member nations.
 

another_armchair

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First and foremost....problem with momins is their religion... And associated Khattarpanthi / Madrassa, 's ... They need to be get educated in normal schools and taken on a secular path... Keep them away from mosques from childhood and next gen will come out just fine... It's a long drawn process....

Above happened with us Hindus from. Start... Thats why we got sikularised while momins were kept away as khangress wanted a decisive vote bank to ensure continuity in power... Khangress knew that Hindus cannot unite... As a society while momins have always lived in closed ghettos...
Momins have a switch that makes them greener or devoted to the 'cause' in an instant... this is the problem.

No amount of education and secular credentials among subcontinent Muslims will help them win trust of non-muslims.. its the same belief among Middle East Christians/Jews about Muslims.. the reason for distrust is simple - Education < Quran < Mullah

There is no light at the end of the tunnel till they walk out of it themselves.
 

armortec

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“Cooperative Vietnam” v/s “Competitive India”

Undeniably, the outflow of industries will be a blow to the Chinese economy. However, some Chinese experts believe that the negative impact to China would be far less if these industries relocated to Vietnam rather than India. After all, Vietnam is constrained by a small domestic market, meaning that it could only play a minor role as a processing and transhipment hub in the global electronics industry chain. Thus, China need not feel threatened by the loss of manufacturing to Vietnam, and could still treat it as an extension/spill over of China's economic space, as an expansion of the international influence of China's industrial chain.

But the feeling is quite different when it comes to India.
The South Asian giant, which is currently not quite a part of China-centric supply chain/network system but is set to maintain a higher economic growth rate than that of China for the foreseeable future, has an extended demographic dividend, a vast domestic market, an improving electronic industry chain, a more developed software and information industry, and language competencies in line with Europe and the United States. Unsurprisingly, Chinese experts see India as an imminent challenger to China’s position in the global supply chain and an adversary to be wary of.

Therefore, a popular view in China is that even though Vietnam may be a pain-point in the short term, India, which has ambitions of becoming a manufacturing great power, is a bigger threat to China in the long run.
It is within this context that China should strive to “distinguish between friend and foe” (分清敌友) between a cooperative Vietnam and a competitive India.

https://lkyspp.nus.edu.sg/cag/publi...ndia-and-the-contest-for-global-supply-chains
It's noticable CCP anti-India rhetoric has somewhat toned down of late. One of their usual shit-stirrer diplomats even used a Jaishankar quote on Western hypocrisy - serves both purposes of appearing to soften to India and try drive a wedge between India and the West. If I was PM of India I'm not sure what different could be done geopolitically - need Western/Eastern investment and if Russia/China/whoever wants to put money in then why not take it? CCP also wants Indonesia to be a vassal state/military base to check India too.

But is Chinese economy actually slowing down? Is FDI decreasing? Judging by inflation and GDP the trade war appears to be affecting the West more but who really knows.

To show itself to be completely "open for business" does India still need to ditch it's British/USSR ingrained commie/socialist freebie mindset? What are the core issues stopping a bigger influx of FDI coming into India? Low tech, middle tech, high tech - I want my chaddis, my car, my PC and my PC's chips to be made and designed in India.

50cents refuse to acknowledge their huge economic growth was thanks to the West - and yet CCP hypocritically are trying to threaten India against doing the very same. The other factor the article misses out is how there were no external actors trying to harm China's growth in the way CCP has harmed India. Korea, Japan neutered by USA, USSR dissolved, India docile. In return, CCP has shat up India's neighbourhood not forgetting invading India, Bhutanese and Nepalese territory. Porkbrains given nukes and the dream of some magic corridor. Sri Lanka made bankrupt with India left to foot the bill. Nepal (and maybe Bangladesh too) teetering. Burma all over the place. Result for India? No neighbours to trade and make profit with.
 

Crazywithmath

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It's noticable CCP anti-India rhetoric has somewhat toned down of late. One of their usual shit-stirrer diplomats even used a Jaishankar quote on Western hypocrisy - serves both purposes of appearing to soften to India and try drive a wedge between India and the West.
Cheenis have been pulling out these shits for decades now; just to confuse the credulous Indian establishments/ babus. They view India as nothing but a great 'obstacle' in their path towards some apparent 'world domination' or some shit (I recall chong thinktanks coined a specific term for it).

Well, surprisingly or perhaps not, their strategy actually worked; successive Indian governments genuinely believed that they could get chummy with each other, lulz; so much so that they even opened markets for cheenis while drinking the kool aid of globalisation and hoping for reciprocation and ultimately, ended up losing portions of domestic manufacturing. How many of you know that India used to be one of the largest, if not the largest, manufacturers of active pharmaceutical ingredients and key starting materials in the world back in the 90's? Almost entirety of those supply chains slowly shifted to cheenistan due to their attractive (and very often outright 'illegal') export subsidies.
 

Love Charger

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Tough choice in hot summer... Specially when Lemon prices were skyrocketing..

We can't simply avoid something which is part of day to day life but need to bring their alternatives to counter the evil things present in market.
Ek kaam kariye haldiram ka aam panna pilijiye
 

no smoking

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China’s course of action?

As evident from the writings of Chinese scholars, China’s policy priority at the moment is to prevent the formation of a US-India supply chain collaboration as the engine of fourth wave of industrialization. To achieve this, the view in Beijing is that China must pull India into the existing China-centred economic circuit (US+West+China) and forge a close China-India supply chain system. By tying India closely to China through economic and trade means, Beijing plans to prevent the ‘US+West+India’ industrial model from ever coming to fruition.
Unfortunately, the reality is different:
1. Chinese doesn't think they have to pull India into the existing China-centred economic circuit (US+West+China) because it is much better to let West have an expensive India.
2. No one is thinking a close China-India supply chain system (not sure what it is, never heard of). Instead, Chinese is thinking an Asia (South East + East) supply Chain system. That is why Chinese didn't give what India asked for RCEP.
 

Shuturmurg

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Unfortunately, the reality is different:
1. Chinese doesn't think they have to pull India into the existing China-centred economic circuit (US+West+China) because it is much better to let West have an expensive India.
2. No one is thinking a close China-India supply chain system (not sure what it is, never heard of). Instead, Chinese is thinking an Asia (South East + East) supply Chain system. That is why Chinese didn't give what India asked for RCEP.
China didn't reject India from RCEP, India rejected RCEP.
 

Cheepek

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Unfortunately, the reality is different:
1. Chinese doesn't think they have to pull India into the existing China-centred economic circuit (US+West+China) because it is much better to let West have an expensive India.
2. No one is thinking a close China-India supply chain system (not sure what it is, never heard of). Instead, Chinese is thinking an Asia (South East + East) supply Chain system. That is why Chinese didn't give what India asked for RCEP.
You threw Pakistan under the bus as a lollipop for BRICS expansion. Ofcourse you don't want....
 

Crazywithmath

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China didn't reject India from RCEP, India rejected RCEP.
The same with BRI, OBOR. Cheeni farms actively lobbied for getting included in respective PLI schemes as well; before GoI rejected their proposals. 👇

They view India as nothing but a great 'obstacle' in their path towards some apparent 'world domination' or some shit (I recall chong thinktanks coined a specific term for it).
 

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