Indian Ballistic Missile Defense System

A.V.

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true but our non-nuclear brahmos range had to be reduced to 390km I know one is offensive and one is defensive/offensive but like anything else rules can be bent if you wrote them.
brahmos is a nuclear capable missile
 

pyromaniac

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brahmos is a nuclear capable missile i think.
They made a special version


India on Tuesday successfully test-fired a new version of the nuclear-capable BrahMos missile at Pokhran in Rajasthan's desert.

The test comes in the midst of heightened tension between India and Pakistan following the Mumbai terror attacks.

Defence minister AK Antony, however, told reporters in New Delhi that the test was pre- planned and not directed against any country.

http://www.financialexpress.com/news/new-nuclearcapable-brahmos-version-testfired/413111/
 

Singh

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India is not a signatory to MTCR.

MTCR Introduction

The Regime's documents include the MTCR Guidelines and the Equipment, Software and Technology Annex. The Guidelines define the purpose of the MTCR and provide the overall structure and rules to guide the member countries and those adhering unilaterally to the Guidelines. The Equipment, Software and Technology Annex is designed to assist in implementing export controls on MTCR Annex items. The Annex is divided into "Category I" and "Category II" items. It includes a broad range of equipment and technology, both military and dual-use, that are relevant to missile development, production, and operation. Partner countries exercise restraint in the consideration of all transfers of items contained in the Annex. All such transfers are considered on a case by case basis.

Greatest restraint is applied to what are known as Category I items. These items include complete rocket systems (including ballistic missiles, space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and unmanned air vehicle systems (including cruise missiles systems, target and reconnaissance drones) with capabilities exceeding a 300km/500kg range/payload threshold; production facilities for such systems; and major sub-systems including rocket stages, re-entry vehicles, rocket engines, guidance systems and warhead mechanisms.

The remainder of the annex is regarded as Category II, which includes complete rocket systems (including ballistic missiles systems, space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and unmanned air vehicles (including cruise missile systems, target drones, and reconnaissance drones) not covered in item I, capable of a maximum range equal to or greater than, 300km. Also included are a wide range of equipment, material, and technologies, most of which have uses other than for missiles capable of delivering WMD. While still agreeing to exercise restraint, partners have greater flexibility in the treatment of Category II transfer applications.

The MTCR Guidelines specifically state that the Regime is "not designed to impede national space programs or international cooperation in such programs as long as such programs could not contribute to delivery systems for weapons of mass destruction." MTCR partners are careful with SLV equipment and technology transfers, however, since the technology used in an SLV is virtually identical to that used in a ballistic missile, which poses genuine potential for missile proliferation.

MTCR text

Guidelines for Sensitive Missile-Relevant Transfers

1. The purpose of these Guidelines is to limit the risks of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (i.e. nuclear, chemical and biological weapons), by controlling transfers that could make a contribution to delivery systems (other than manned aircraft) for such weapons. The Guidelines are also intended to limit the risk of controlled items and their technology falling into the hands of terrorist groups and individuals. The Guidelines are not designed to impede national space programs or international cooperation in such programs as long as such programs could not contribute to delivery systems for weapons of mass destruction. These Guidelines, including the attached Annex, form the basis for controlling transfers to any destination beyond the Government's jurisdiction or control of all delivery systems (other than manned aircraft) capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction, and of equipment and technology relevant to missiles whose performance in terms of payload and range exceeds stated parameters. Restraint will be exercised in the consideration of all transfers of items within the Annex and all such transfers will be considered on a case-by-case basis. The Government will implement the Guidelines in accordance with national legislation.

2. The Annex consists of two categories of items, which term includes equipment and technology. Category I items, all of which are in Annex items 1 and 2, are those items of greatest sensitivity. If a Category I item is included in a system, that system will also be considered as Category I, except when the incorporated item cannot be separated, removed or duplicated. Particular restraint will be exercised in the consideration of Category I transfers regardless of their purpose, and there will be a strong presumption to deny such transfers. Particular restraint will also be exercised in the consideration of transfers of any items in the Annex, or of any missiles (whether or not in the Annex), if the Government judges, on the basis of all available, persuasive information, evaluated according to factors including those in paragraph 3, that they are intended to be used for the delivery of weapons of mass destruction, and there will be a strong presumption to deny such transfers. Until further notice, the transfer of Category I production facilities will not be authorised. The transfer of other Category I items will be authorised only on rare occasions and where the Government (A) obtains binding government-to-government undertakings embodying the assurances from the recipient government called for in paragraph 5 of these Guidelines and (B) assumes responsibility for taking all steps necessary to ensure that the item is put only to its stated end-use. It is understood that the decision to transfer remains the sole and sovereign judgement of the Government.

3. In the evaluation of transfer applications for Annex items, the following factors will be taken into account:

A. Concerns about the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction;

B. The capabilities and objectives of the missile and space programs of the recipient state;

C. The significance of the transfer in terms of the potential development of delivery systems (other than manned aircraft) for weapons of mass destruction;

D. The assessment of the end use of the transfers, including the relevant assurances of the recipient states referred to in sub paragraphs 5.A and 5.B below;

E. The applicability of relevant multilateral agreements.

F. The risk of controlled items falling into the hands of terrorist groups and individuals.


4. The transfer of design and production technology directly associated with any items in the Annex will be subject to as great a degree of scrutiny and control as will the equipment itself, to the extent permitted by national legislation.

5. Where the transfer could contribute to a delivery system for weapons of mass destruction, the Government will authorize transfers of items in the Annex only on receipt of appropriate assurances from the government of the recipient state that:

A. The items will be used only for the purpose stated and that such use will not be modified nor the items modified or replicated without the prior consent of the Government;

B. Neither the items nor replicas nor derivatives thereof will be re transferred without the consent of the Government.

6. In furtherance of the effective operation of the Guidelines, the Government will, as necessary and appropriate, exchange relevant in formation with other governments applying the same Guidelines.

7. The Government will :

A. provide that its national export controls require an authorisation for the transfer of non-listed items if the exporter has been informed by the competent authorities of the Government that the items may be intended, in their entirety or part, for use in connection with delivery systems for weapons of mass destruction other than manned aircraft ;

B. and, if the exporter is aware that non-listed items are intended to contribute to such activities, in their entirety or part, provide, to the extent compatible with national export controls, for notification by the exporter to the authorities referred to above, which will decide whether or not it is appropriate to make the export concerned subject to authorisation.

8. The adherence of all States to these Guidelines in the interest of international peace and security would be welcome.
The annex is at http://www.mtcr.info/english/MTCRTechnicalAnnexNov2008.pdf


http://www.mtcr.info
 

foofighter

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Great news, but hate it when they cant meet the deadlines. I always wonder we let engineers from various top-class T-schools get hired by international companies..why not give them a comparitive pay package and attract IIT-ians towards defence. Wouldn't that be great? THese guys are the best in the world..Surely they can skyrocket defence research of our country, maybe even make it the best in the world.
 
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Lot of times it's not an software issue but the hardware, like for brahmos we developed everything except the engine, but now with brahmos 2 and Avatar even engines may not be a problem? but same delay with LCA.
 
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Crucial interceptor missile test this week

http://www.thehindu.com/2009/03/04/stories/2009030460291100.htm

Crucial interceptor missile test this week

Y. Mallikarjun & T.S. Subramanian

It will establish India’s capability to intercept Pakistan’s Hatf and Ghauri missiles

CHENNAI: A missile which will waylay and destroy an incoming ballistic “enemy” at an altitude of about 80 km will be launched off the coast of Orissa later this week.

This “crucial test” will seek to prove the efficacy of a host of new technologies, said officials in the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), which is conducting it. They described it as “a major test to establish a ballistic missile defence [BMD] shield as part of the network-centric warfare.” This is the third time an interceptor missile test is being conducted under the BMD shield that India seeks to establish.

The launch will feature two missiles. The “enemy” missile will be a modified version of Dhanush, a surface-to-surface missile. It will take off from a naval ship in the Bay of Bengal and simulate the terminal phase of the flight of a ballistic missile with a range of 1,500 km, similar to Pakistan’s Ghauri. As it zeroes in on the Wheeler Island, off Damra village on the Orissa coast, a Prithvi Air Defence (PAD) missile will lift off from the Wheeler Island, intercept the incoming “enemy” missile at an altitude of 70-80 km in the last one second and a half of its flight and pulverise it.

The interceptor PAD missile will use, for the first time, the gimballed directional warhead. It has so far been used only in the U.S. and Russia. When the directional warhead fragments in 360 degrees all round, the target missile coming in from only one direction is sure to be blown up. “Ground tests have been done on the directional warhead. In flight, it will be done for the first time. This is a new thing,” the DRDO officials said.

A directional warhead weighs less than 30 kg but its lethality is equivalent to a 150-kg warhead. The PAD would also feature “trajectory optimisation” to enable interception at not only a higher altitude of 80 or 85 km but also at 45 km. It could engage missiles with a range of 300 to 1,500 km.

“The distinct advantage” of intercepting a missile at a higher altitude of 80 km is that the debris will take longer to fall through the atmosphere before it hits the ground and hence will become cinders because of the re-entry of heat, the DRDO officials said. In a typical war scenario, this would reduce the effect of any fallout of nuclear debris and the risk associated with radiation.

The first interceptor missile test, which took place on November 27, 2006, waylaid an incoming ballistic missile in the exo-atmosphere at 48-km altitude. The second test took place on December 6, 2007 against a target missile at 15-km altitude in endo-atmosphere. The third test would be part of India’s plan to deploy a two-layered BMD system in the coming years.

In terms of strategic importance, the test would establish India’s capability to intercept Pakistan’s Hatf and Ghauri missiles.
 

nitesh

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http://www.indianexpress.com/news/what-went-wrong-with-lca-arjun-tank-akash-missile/429935/1



Akash Medium Range Surface-to-Air Missile

StatuS: The work started in 1983, but the system failed to meet all deadlines set for development. While the Air Force will be inducting the system shortly, it is yet to meet the Army’s requirements. The missile system has failed mobility tests in the deserts, where it was too heavy and got stuck in the sand during trials. Cannot negotiate steep sand dunes. Developers over-estimated own capabilities, set unrealistic targets and did not involve the Armed Forces during the development, says the committee.

•Should immediately start work on a new Mk II version of the missile.

•DRDO has to make all out effort to involve the Army and Air Force in the development of the new system to meet all their requirements.

•DRDO to take up a joint development approach with foreign collaborator.
 

A.V.

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Missile Defense: Interceptor Missile Test to be Conducted this week

A missile which will waylay and destroy an incoming ballistic "enemy" at an altitude of about 80 km will be launched off the coast of Orissa later this week.
This "crucial test" will seek to prove the efficacy of a host of new technologies, said officials in the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), which is conducting it. They described it as "a major test to establish a ballistic missile defence [BMD] shield as part of the network-centric warfare." This is the third time an interceptor missile test is being conducted under the BMD shield that India seeks to establish.

The launch will feature two missiles. The "enemy" missile will be a modified version of Dhanush, a surface-to-surface missile. It will take off from a naval ship in the Bay of Bengal and simulate the terminal phase of the flight of a ballistic missile with a range of 1,500 km, similar to Pakistan's Ghauri. As it zeroes in on the Wheeler Island, off Damra village on the Orissa coast, a Prithvi Air Defence (PAD) missile will lift off from the Wheeler Island, intercept the incoming "enemy" missile at an altitude of 70-80 km in the last one second and a half of its flight and pulverise it.

The interceptor PAD missile will use, for the first time, the gimballed directional warhead. It has so far been used only in the U.S. and Russia. When the directional warhead fragments in 360 degrees all round, the target missile coming in from only one direction is sure to be blown up. "Ground tests have been done on the directional warhead. In flight, it will be done for the first time. This is a new thing," the DRDO officials said.
Light, lethal

A directional warhead weighs less than 30 kg but its lethality is equivalent to a 150-kg warhead. The PAD would also feature "trajectory optimisation" to enable interception at not only a higher altitude of 80 or 85 km but also at 45 km. It could engage missiles with a range of 300 to 1,500 km.
Risk elimination

"The distinct advantage" of intercepting a missile at a higher altitude of 80 km is that the debris will take longer to fall through the atmosphere before it hits the ground and hence will become cinders because of the re-entry of heat, the DRDO officials said. In a typical war scenario, this would reduce the effect of any fallout of nuclear debris and the risk associated with radiation.

The first interceptor missile test, which took place on November 27, 2006, waylaid an incoming ballistic missile in the exo-atmosphere at 48-km altitude. The second test took place on December 6, 2007 against a target missile at 15-km altitude in endo-atmosphere. The third test would be part of India's plan to deploy a two-layered BMD system in the coming years. In terms of strategic importance, the test would establish India's capability to intercept Pakistan's Hatf and Ghauri missiles.


http://www.india-defence.com/reports/4261
 

nitesh

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The good thing is that they are using "directional warhead". Thi is a good development. This can be used in "Astra" too
 

nitesh

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http://www.indiatoday.intoday.in/in...view&id=31436&sectionid=4&issueid=95&Itemid=1

Missile defence shield: India to test interceptor on Friday
IANS
New Delhi, March 5, 2009

India will on Friday test launch its indigenous interceptor missile that will destroy an incoming ballistic "enemy" missile at an altitude of 80 km and will provide defence against Pakistani and Chinese missiles, an official said.

"All the preparations have been made and all the scientists are working to make the test successful," a Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) official said.

The test, to be conducted at Wheeler's Island off the coast of Orissa, will establish the credible missile defence against Paksitan's Hatf and Ghauri missiles. The first test of the interceptor missile was conducted in 2006.

"During the test an 'enemy' missile which will be a modified version of the Dhanush surface-to-surface missile will be fired from a naval ship in the Bay of Bengal and simulate the terminal phase of the flight of a ballistic missile with a range of 1,500 km, similar to Pakistan's Ghauri missile," the official said.

"As the incoming missile nears Wheeler Island, a Prithvi air defence missile will be launched to intercept it at an altitude of about 80 km and kill it," the official added.

DRDO needs to carry out at least three to four trials with both versions before the missile shield is certified for operational use.

"The test will mark the completion of the first phase of the programme and it will secure operational clearance by 2012-13,"
the official added.

On December 6, 2007, DRDO had for the second time successfully tested an endo-atmospheric - below 30 km altitude - version of the ballistic missile defence shield. The missile aims to protect populated areas and vital installations like nuclear power stations and oil wells.

The missile shield will have highly sensitive radars to track incoming missiles. The guidance system would ensure that the interceptor collides with the incoming missile within a matter of seconds, thereby saving vital targets from destruction.

Baptised as the Prithvi Air Defence system, the agile interceptor has now been renamed Pradyumna.

DRDO says its missile system is comparable to the Israeli Arrow system and the American Patriot system, both of whose manufacturers are courting the Indian defence establishment for possible orders.

DRDO expects ballistic missile shield to take care of threats from existing Chinese and Pakistani missiles. While Pakistan possesses missiles with ranges between 400 and 2,000 km, the Chinese arsenal varies from a range of 300 km to 2,800 km.
 

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Ballistic missile shield test today, says DRDO

New Delhi, March 5: Moving a step closer towards developing an indigenous Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) shield, the DRDO is planning to test the system off the coast of Orissa on Friday.

"The test of our indigenous BMD system has been planned for Friday," DRDO officials said.

During the test, DRDO will launch its exo-atmospheric interceptor Prithvi Air Defence (PAD) missile, which can destroy in-coming ballistic missiles at an altitude between 50 and 80 km, officials said.

DRDO’s BMD programme is a two-tier system consisting of two interceptor missiles, namely PAD missile for high altitude interception, and the Advanced Air Defence (AAD) missile for lower altitude interception.

During Friday’s launch, two missiles will fired with a modified version of the Dhanush surface-to-surface missile simulating as an "enemy" missile, which will be fired from a Naval ship, they said.
 

nitesh

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good news party time now

http://frontierindia.net/indian-bmd-test-sucess-third-time-in-a-row

Indian BMD test success, third time in a row
Written on March 6, 2009 – 4:40 pm | by Frontier India Strategic and Defence |

Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) has flight tested third Ballistic Missile Interceptor on 06 March 2009 at 1624 hrs from Wheeler Island, Integrated Test Range (ITR) successfully achieving the mission objectives set. The two stage Interceptor Missile fitted with advanced systems has neutralized the target, enemy missile at 75 Kms altitude.

To mimic the incoming enemy’s ballistic missile trajectory Dhanush missile went to an altitude of 120 Km and was launched from ship about 100 km away from Coast. The Interceptor missile was launched using mobile launcher located on Wheeler Island Launch Complex.

The third consecutive interception of Ballistic Missiles once again demonstrated the robustness of the Indian BMD system. DRDO have already conducted two interception trials, first in Exo-atmospheric region at 48 Kms altitude on 27th November 06 and second in endo-atmospheric region at 15 kms using AAD missile on 06 Dec 07.
 

Neo

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Mubarak ho mubarak ho! :idhitit:
 

Triton

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You beat me in posting that news Nitesh :drink: anyway cheers for the third successful interception; Need more and more tests before we could induct them in to service
 

nitesh

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You beat me in posting that news Nitesh :drink: anyway cheers for the third successful interception; Need more and more tests before we could induct them in to service
No problem better luck next time. This test was mainly to demonstrate the capability of LRTR so let's look for the updates as now the details will start coming in
 

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