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'Bhabha Kavach': Midhani Masters Armour That Can Stop AK-47 Shots
At a time when India has started facing some tough challenges along the Line of Actual Control with China, an exclusive armour unit to manufacture bullet-proof jackets of international standards and protective gear and to supply bullet-proof vehicles will come up at Mishra Dhatu Nigam Ltd (Midhani) in Hyderabad’s Kanchanbagh area.




The bullet-proof jackets are named ‘Bhabha Kavach’ since the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) had developed the technology. These jackets can even stop a bullet fired from an AK-47 as well. A few hundred bulletproof jackets have already been supplied to the paramilitary forces as samples.



“We have mastered the technology to deliver these bullet-proof jackets in huge quantities. We will also be keeping an eye on the ammunition that is developed across the world and make suitable changes accordingly to upgrade the jackets,” said Midhani chairman and managing director Sanjay Kumar Jha.



The bulletproof jackets that are manufactured in Midhani meet the specifications of the Union ministry of home affairs and also the BIS level-6.



Sanjay Kumar said time has come for Midhani to diversify, including having a full-fledged armour plant which will have in addition to bullet-proof jackets, vehicle armoury and also protective gear for the armed forces.



An armoured vehicle which TOI saw at Midhani has features that security agencies will find suitable for use in challenging situations. For example, even if a tyre were to be shot at, the vehicle would still be able to travel a distance of 100 km. This, in technical parlance, is called ‘run flat tyres’ system. The vehicle, described as first-ever Isuzu-based combat vehicle, has several other features too. While its carrying capacity with weapons is seven persons, the vehicle can be used as a quick response team, escort vehicle, troops carrier in counter-insurgency operations and for other operational duties.

Centre’s Atmanirbhar Bharat concept has come as a shot in the arm for the defence public sector enterprise as preference will have to be given to it instead of going for imports. Since Midhani has mastered the technology and proven that it can supply bullet-proof jackets produced indigenously, experts said the armed forces and security agencies could make purchases from Midhani.
Hopefully it doesn't take 15 years to procure but rather they can have enough for the entire forces within 5 years
 

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Carbines, Anti Air Systems for Indian Army to be made in India after MoD cancels import
The defence ministry has cancelled two arms import contracts for the army worth over $ 2.5 billion that were in the final stages, preferring to go for the Make in India route. In a special meeting held on Tuesday, chaired by the Defence Secretary, it has been decided that plans to procure close quarter carbines from a UAE based company and a program to import Self Propelled Air Defence systems from South Korea are being scrapped.

The meeting, which was also attended by Chief of Defence Staff Gen Bipin Rawat, concluded that the contracts will now be placed under the Make in India initiative to give a boost to the domestic industry, sources said.

It is not clear under which clause the procurements would proceed but the army has projected an urgent requirement for close quarter carbines and had been processing the deal under a fast track process. As reported by ET, a view within the government was that with recent announcements on Atmanirbhar Bharat, as well as representations from domestic companies promising an equivalent product for sale, the import case needs to be cancelled.


A UAE based arms manufacturer Caracal had been shortlisted to supply 93895 close quarter carbines for the army has written to the defence ministry after it emerged as the lowest bidder for a fast track procurement by the army in 2018.

The case was tricky, given that the Caracal group had not been originally included in the list of companies to which tenders were to be issued in 2018 by the army. It only managed to enter the competition after the Acquisition wing of the Defence Ministry recommended its inclusion. Fed up with delays in the acquisition case that was to be fast tracked, the Army had recommended either the case has to be shut down or should move to the next stage of contract negotiation at the earliest.

The acquisition case for Self Propelled Air Defence Gun Missile System (SPAD-GMS) – the Indian Army wants five regiments of the guns that can be deployed with forward moving forces and can be quickly relocated on the basis of threat perception – has also been cancelled after South Korean company Hanwa’s K 30 Biho was shortlisted by the Army.

The estimated $ 2.5 billion contract for new air defence systems for the Army has been hanging fire since last year after Russia protested that it had been unfairly disqualified from the competition in which the Korean company was shortlisted.

Both the Russian upgraded Tunguska M1 and Pantsir missile systems failed to qualify for the acquisition of 104 system that are needed by the Army, promoting a formal complaint to the Independent Monitors (IMs) set up within the MoD to monitor acquisition cases.

As reported by ET the IMs recommended that the Russians be given another chance to prove the system. This however, was found to be unfair by the acquisition wing that had pointed out that a re-trial opportunity at this late stage would set a dangerous new precedent and would vitiate the principle of a level playing field.

While the recommendation was to expedite the contract negotiation or move for a retrial at the earliest, the contract has now been scrapped keeping in mind new plans under the Make in India initiative.

The two programs would come as a welcome surprise for the Indian industry, particularly the private sector, which has developed capabilities over the past few years to manufacture such systems domestically.
 

12arya

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‘Big experience in winter warfare’: Army officer amid border row

The comment comes on the back of bursts of bullets fired into the air last week on the northern bank of Pangong Tso amid a protracted stand-off with China along the Line of Actual Control (LAC).

It may be stated that retired Indian army generals and defence analysts anticipate a long haul and a hot winter in the eastern Ladakh this year.

It may be stated that retired Indian army generals and defence analysts anticipate a long haul and a hot winter in the eastern Ladakh this year. (PTI)

Indian soldiers have a huge experience of winter warfare, said Indian Army officer on Wednesday, adding the troops are psychologically tuned to operate at a short notice. The comment comes on the back of bursts of bullets fired into the air last week on the northern bank of Pangong Tso amid a protracted stand-off with China along the Line of Actual Control (LAC).

It may be stated that retired Indian army generals and defence analysts anticipate a long haul and a hot winter in the eastern Ladakh this year.

“India is a peace-loving country and wishes to have good relations with its neighbours. India always prefers to resolve issues through dialogue. While talks are in progress to resolve the issue of borders with China in Eastern Ladakh, at the military level it is well prepared for the prolonged stand-off,” said the officer.


“Altitudes in Ladakh range from high to super high and there is a lot of snowfall, after the month of November up to 40 feet of snow is experienced. Coupled with this, temperature dipping down to minus 30 to 40 degrees is a usual phenomenon. Wind chill factor makes matters even worse for the troops. The roads also get closed due to the snow. But despite all this, the most encouraging part for India is that the Indian soldiers have a huge experience of winter warfare and are psychologically tuned to operate at a short notice. While this fact is known to the world, the operational logistics capabilities are hardly known,” he added.
It is important to understand that the Army has experience of Siachen where conditions are much more demanding than the frontiers with China.

Traditionally, there were two routes for moving into Ladakh, that is through Zojila and Rohtang Passes.
Recently, India commissioned the third road from Darcha to Leh which is much shorter distance-wise and less prone to closure. Completion of Atal tunnel on the Rohtang route has force multiplied the logistic capacities.

Special fuel and lubricants for tanks and armoured personnel carriers have also been stocked adequately, including spares for their maintenance.

Water points and tube wells have been established for the troops and animals like mules and yaks.
The living barracks have also been prepared which are comfortable and warm. Facilities such as the central heating system are some of the high points of these facilities.
 

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Xi’s aggressive moves against India ‘unexpectedly flopped’: Report

Xi, 67, already roiling the Communist Party with a “rectification” campaign and mass persecution of foes, will launch “another brutal purge” following the Chinese army’s failures on the Indian border, the Newsweek said in an opinion piece.


Describing Xi Jinping as the “architect” of the PLA’s recent aggressive moves against India, a leading US magazine has reported that the Chinese President has risked his future with the high-profile incursions into Indian territory that “unexpectedly flopped” in the face of a ferocious fightback by the Indian Army.

Xi, 67, already roiling the Communist Party with a “rectification” campaign and mass persecution of foes, will launch “another brutal purge” following the Chinese army’s failures on the Indian border, the Newsweek said in an opinion piece.

“Unfortunately for Xi, he is the “architect” of these aggressive moves into India and his People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has unexpectedly flopped. The Chinese army’s failures on the Indian border will have consequences,” it said, adding that the recent developments give Xi an excuse to pick up the pace of replacing adversaries in the armed forces with loyal elements.

“More important, the failures motivate China’s aggressive ruler- who as chairman of the Party’s Central Military Commission, is the leader of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and the ruling Communist Party of China - to launch another offensive against Indian positions,” the magazine warned.

Tensions escalated manifold along the LAC in eastern Ladakh after the Galwan Valley clashes on June 15 in which 20 Indian Army personnel were killed. The Chinese side also suffered casualties but it is yet to give out the details.

“China is thought to have suffered at least 43 deaths in the Galwan clash,” the magazine said.
Citing Cleo Paskal of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, it said the number of Chinese killed could exceed 60. “Indian troops fought back ferociously. Beijing won’t admit the extent of the debacle,” it said.
It said that late last month, for the first time in a half-century, India carried out an offensive against China, taking back high ground the Chinese recently grabbed. “China’s forces were surprised when Indian troops mounted their attempt to retake strategic high points. Stunned Chinese soldiers retreated,” it said.
“China’s subsequent efforts to counter the Indian moves proved ineffective. At least for the moment, India’s troops, in the southernmost of the three areas of conflict, are in control of territory once in Chinese hands,” it added.

It said the PLA Ground Force can move against undefended targets. However, it is not clear how effective it is in battle.

“The Ground Force does not have a track record of success in contested situations. Its last major engagement was in 1979 when, in the effort to ‘teach Vietnam a lesson,’ the Chinese troops were repelled and humiliated by their much smaller neighbour,” the magazine noted.
“India is not giving the invaders the opportunity to improve,” it said, adding that India’s troops are displaying “newfound boldness”.

“The game has changed,” Paskal said. “You can say the Indians are more aggressive or more aggressively defensive, but they are in fact bolder and better.” “The setback in the Himalayas poses problems for Xi, which means it poses a problem for everyone else,” it added.

It said that in China’s highly politicised system, the setbacks in Ladakh cannot be perceived as Xi’s fault, so he will almost surely purge elements of the military. “PLA leaders begin to see little choice but to undertake offensive military actions to avoid becoming a victim of Xi’s internal terror,” said Richard Fisher of the Virginia-based International Assessment and Strategy Center.

The Indian Army and the PLA have been locked in a tense standoff in multiple areas along the LAC in eastern Ladakh since early May.

Following fresh confrontation around the southern bank of the Pangong lake, India further bolstered its military presence in the region by sending additional troops, battle tanks and other weaponry. Amidst the very tense situation in eastern Ladakh, India and China reached an agreement to resolve their border row at a meeting between External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar and his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi in Moscow on September 10 on the sidelines of a Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) meet.
The agreement included measures like quick disengagement of troops, avoiding action that could escalate tensions, adherence to all agreements and protocols on border management and steps to restore peace along the LAC.

It also mentioned that the two sides should expedite work to conclude “new confidence-building measures” to enhance peace and tranquillity in the border areas. However, the agreement has not mentioned any timeline for the disengagement of troops.
 

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Echoes of heroism in Rezang La
The historic Battle of Rezang La, fought at heights of more than 18,000 feet, saw 124 Indian soldiers repel attack after attack by a numerically superior and better-equipped enemy in November 1962.


Indian Army soldiers pay their respects at Rezang La War Memorial, in Ladakh.
Indian Army soldiers pay their respects at Rezang La War Memorial, in Ladakh.(HT Archive)

The People’s Liberation Army (PLA) on Monday fired shots in a failed attempt to intimidate and dislodge Indian soldiers holding dominating heights near a towering mountain pass in eastern Ladakh, where heavily outnumbered Indian troops put up a fierce fight against Chinese soldiers on a chilly Sunday morning during the 1962 war.

The historic Battle of Rezang La, fought at heights of more than 18,000 feet, saw 124 Indian soldiers repel attack after attack by a numerically superior and better-equipped enemy in November 1962.

The soldiers from the Charlie Company of the 13th battalion of the Kumaon Regiment were pitched against more than 5,000 Chinese troops, with the advancing enemy infantry being supported by heavy artillery fire. Led by the legendary Major Shaitan Singh, whose outstanding leadership and courage is the stuff of legend, the unbelievably fearless men from the C Company fought to the last bullet and inflicted heavy casualties on the Chinese army.

Three months after the battle, the frozen bodies of Indian soldiers were found in their trenches – the dead men still holding their weapons.

The first attack launched by the enemy at the crack of dawn on November 18 was blunted with the Major ordering his men to open fire at the Chinese the moment they came within their rifle range, according to a book published by the Ranikhet-based Kumaon Regimental Centre.

“Many of the enemies fell, others continued to advance. But with every weapon of C Company firing, the gullies in front of the 8 Platoon were soon full of dead and wounded Chinese,” says the book The Images of Valour and Triumph, published in 2005.

After their first attack failed due to stiff Indian resistance, the Chinese resorted to heavy artillery bombardment of the positions held by Major Singh and his men. The Indian soldiers had the odds stacked against them, but the fierce assault failed to crush their fighting spirit and determination to defend their positions till their last breath.

The heavy shelling helped the Chinese troops launch multiple assaults and the C Company soon found itself surrounded by the enemy. The book says Major Singh reorganised the positions held by his soldiers and re-sited the automatic weapons to take on the Chinese troops, a move that resulted in the enemy suffering more casualties.

The heroic officer was killed in action in this phase of the battle that resulted in 114 Indian deaths in a few hours of fighting.

A chapter on the Battle of Rezang La in the book says, “The dead men were found in their trenches, frozen stiff, still holding their weapons. Broken light machine gun bipods, and some men holding only the butts of their rifles while the remaining weapon had blown off, bore witness to the enemy fire.” Their mortal remains were found three months later.

Different estimates peg the number of Chinese killed in the battle at between 500 and 1,300.
Major Singh was posthumously awarded the Param Vir Chakra – the country’s highest wartime gallantry award – for the exceptional courage and leadership demonstrated by him in the battle.

General VP Malik, former chief of army staff who was inducted in the Ladakh sector in October 1962 as Captain with 3 Sikh Li, said: “We were directly in the Chushul battlefront, but were preparing defences in the rear on Dungti-Chuma Tang axis. The tactical significance of Rezang La lies in the dominating heights, Gurung Hill and Magar Hill, which have now been occupied by us. During the war, we did hear about Major Shaitan Singh’s heroic action, but it was much later that I visited the place where he had fallen.”
 

12arya

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Op Snow Leopard: Inside story of how Army reclaimed heights in eastern Ladakh | Exclusive

The Indian Army launched Operation Snow Leopard after China failed to move back and restore status quo ante in eastern Ladakh. The Army finally launched the operation, occupied a number of strategic heights and strengthened its presence in the region.

Gaurav C Sawant LehSeptember 16, 2020UPDATED: September 16, 2020 19:02 IST

Soldiers disembark from a military transport plane at a forward airbase in Leh, in the Ladakh region. (Photo: Reuters)

The Indian Army bolstered its dominance over a number of strategic heights overlooking key Chinese-held positions around Pangong lake area in eastern Ladakh last week even as brigade commanders and commanding officers of the two militaries held talks to cool tensions in the region.

The Indian Army waited for three months of planning before it executed ‘Operation Snow Leopard’ to control key heights along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) in eastern Ladakh, sources have told India Today TV.

>> Sources told India Today that Indian Army initially waited for China to move back but when that did not happen, Army Chief General MM Narawane and Northern Army Commander Lt Gen YK Joshi cleared the crucial operation.

>>
And after months of planning, the Indian Army finally went on to occupy strategic heights identified along the LAC under ‘Op Snow Leopard’.

>> These heights and features have given India not just tactical but also a strategic advantage on the ground and in talks between the two sides. The Army Special Forces now command several features and flanks at multiple friction points.

>> Under ‘Op Snow Leopard’, teams of high altitude mountain warfare specialists were prepared.

>> Each team was tasked to occupy height and secure sustainable supply line.

>> In a swift operation, the Army took control of posts on south and north bank of Pangong Tso and at other locations in eastern Ladakh to keep a hawk-eye vigil on Chinese-held positions.

The Indian Army has occupied several key heights in the strategically located Rezang-La and Reqin-La areas on the southern bank of the lake since the end of August. With the Army occupying key heights, it now has the strength to restore status quo ante at the LAC if talks do not succeed. The Army deployment is effective and dominating not only at Demchok in the south but also Depsang and DBO backed by Indian Air Force.

The border situation deteriorated yet again after China unsuccessfully attempted to occupy Indian territory in the southern bank of Pangong Lake on the intervening night of August 29 and 30. India occupied a number of strategic heights on the southern bank of Pangong lake and strengthened its presence in Finger 2 and Finger 3 areas in the region to thwart any Chinese actions. China strongly objected to India's move. However, India maintained that the heights are on its side of the LAC.

Following China's fresh attempts to change the status quo in the southern bank of Pangong lake, India has further bolstered its military presence in the region.

The ball is now in China’s court. Chinese corp commander has still not reverted on day, date and time for the next round of talks.
 

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Kargil redux: A senior Pakistani Air Force officer's account of the PAF's role in Kargil
(NOTE: This article has appeared in the journal, "Defence and Security of India". It is a cold and objective analysis of the kind that we Indians seem incapable of. I am happy that I played a role in getting this article published in India.)

By Air Commodore M Kaiser Tufail (Retd)
Pakistan Air Force

While the Indians were prompt in setting up an Inquiry Commission into the Kargil fracas, we in Pakistan found it expedient to bury the affair in the �national interest�. Compared to the Indians, Pakistani writings on the Kargil conflict have been pathetically few; those that have come out are largely irrelevant and in a few cases, clearly sponsored. The role of the Pakistan Air Force (PAF) has been discussed off and on, but mostly disparagingly, particularly in some uninformed quarters. Here is an airman�s perspective, focusing on the IAF�s air operations and the PAF�s position.

Operational planning in the PAF

Since an important portion of this write-up pertains to the PAF�s appreciation of the situation and the decision-making loop during the Kargil conflict, we will start with a brief primer on the PAF�s hierarchy and how operational matters are handled at Air Headquarters.

The policy-making elements at Air Headquarters consist of four tiers of staff officers. The top-most tier is made up of the Deputy Chiefs of Air Staff (DCAS) who are the Principal Staff Officers (PSOs) of their respective branches and are nominally headed by the Vice Chief of Air Staff (VCAS). They (along with Air Officers Commanding, the senior representatives from field formations) are members of the Air Board, the PAF�s �corporate� decision-making body, which is chaired by the Chief of the Air Staff (CAS). The next tier is made up of Assistant Chiefs of Air Staff (ACAS) who head various sub-branches and, along with the third-tier Directors, assist the PSOs in policy-making; they are not on the Air Board, but can be called for hearings and presentations in the Board meetings, as required. A fourth tier of Deputy Directors does most of the sundry staff work in this policy-making hierarchy.

The Operations & Plans branch is the key player in any war, conflict or contingency and is responsible for threat assessment and formulation of a suitable response. During peacetime, war plans are drawn up by the Plans sub-branch and are then war-gamed in operational exercises run by the sister Operations sub-branch. Operational training is accordingly restructured and administered by the latter, based on the lessons of various exercises. This essentially is the gist of the PAF�s operational preparedness methodology, the efficiency of which is amply reflected in its readiness and telling response in various wars and skirmishes in the past.

In early 1999, Air Chief Marshal Parvaiz Mehdi Qureshi was at the helm of the PAF. An officer with an imposing personality, he had won the Sword of Honour at the Academy. During the 1971 Indo-Pak War, as a young Flight Lieutenant, he was on a close support mission in erstwhile East Pakistan when his Sabre was shot down and he was taken POW. He determinedly resumed his fighter pilot�s career after repatriation and rose to command PAF�s premier Sargodha Base. He was later appointed as the AOC, Southern Air Command, an appointment that affords considerable interaction amongst the three services, especially in operational exercises. He also held the vitally important post of DCAS (Ops) as well as the VCAS before taking over as CAS.

The post of DCAS (Ops) was held by the late Air Marshal Zahid Anis. A well-qualified fighter pilot, he had a distinguished career in the PAF, having held some of the most sought-after appointments. These included command of No 38 Tactical Wing (F-16s), the elite Combat Commanders� School and PAF Base, Sargodha. He was AOC, Southern Air Command before his appointment as the head of the Operations branch at Air Headquarters. He had done the Air War Course at the PAF�s Air War College, another War Course at the French War College as well as the prestigious course at the Royal College of Defence Studies in the UK.

The ACAS (Ops) was Air Cdre Abid Rao, who had recently completed command of PAF Base, Mianwali. He had earlier done the War Course from the French War College.

The ACAS (Plans) was the late Air Cdre Saleem Nawaz, a brilliant officer who had made his mark at the Staff College at Bracknell, UK, and during the War Course at the National Defence College, Islamabad.

There is no gainsaying the fact that the PAF�s hierarchy was highly qualified and that each of the players in the Operations branch had the requisite command and staff experience. The two top men had also fought in the 1971 Indo-Pak War, albeit as junior officers.

First rumblings

As Director of Operations (in the rank of Gp Capt), my first opportunity to interact with the Army�s Director of Military Operations (DMO) was over a phone call, some time in March 1999. Brig Nadeem Ahmed called with great courtesy and requested some information that he needed for a paper exercise, as he told me. He wanted to know when the PAF had last carried out a deployment at Skardu, how many aircraft were deployed, etc. Rather impressed with the Army�s interest in PAF matters, I passed on the requisite details. The next day Brig Nadeem called again, but this time his questions were more probing and he wanted some classified information including fuel storage capacity at Skardu, fighter sortie-generation capacity, radar coverage, etc. He insisted that he was preparing a briefing and wanted to get his facts and figures right in front of his bosses. We got on a secure line and I passed on the required information. Although he made it sound like routine contingency planning, I sensed that something unusual was brewing. In the event, I thought it prudent to inform the DCAS (Ops). Just to be sure, he checked with his counterpart, the Director General Military Operations (DGMO), Maj Gen Tauqir Zia, who said the same thing as his DMO and, assured us that it was just part of routine contingency planning.

Not withstanding the DGMO�s assurance, a cautious Air Marshal Zahid decided to check things for himself and despatched Gp Capt Tariq Ashraf, Officer Commanding of No 33 Wing at PAF Base, Kamra, to look things over at Skardu and make a report. Within a few days, Gp Capt Tariq (who was also the designated war-time commander of Skardu Base) had completed his visit, which included his own periodic war-readiness inspection. While he made a detailed report to the DCAS (Ops), he let me in on the Army�s mobilisation and other preparations that he had seen in Skardu. His analysis was that �something big is imminent.� Helicopter flying activity was feverishly high as Army Aviation�s Mi-17s were busy moving artillery guns and ammunition to the posts that had been vacated by the Indians during the winter. Troops in battle gear were to be seen all over the city. Interestingly, Messes were abuzz with war chatter amongst young officers. In retrospect, one wonders how Indian intelligence agencies failed to read any such signs, many weeks before the operation unfolded.
Dear Sridharji. It's interesting reading. Won't it be great if things of such insights are attached as a PDF along with the valuable post giving bullet points. PDF can be used for future reference. And I am not referring to just this one. Have seen many others lost in the deluge of posts.
 

12arya

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Indian Army Soldiers At Ladakh Get Waterproof Tents With Heater And Multi-Layered Clothes For Winter
by Tarkesh Jha - Sep 16, 2020 05:27 PM

Indian Army Soldiers At Ladakh Get Waterproof Tents With Heater And Multi-Layered Clothes For Winter
Indian Army troops at Ladakh (Doordarshan)

The Indian armed forces are ensuring that the soldiers acquire the most proficient equipment in Ladakh as the weather conditions are set to worsen in the coming months.

According to ANI, the Indian Army has been provided with all-weather accommodation and multi-layered clothing for the betterment of its personnel in the region. Officials from the forces state that these garments will enable the soldiers to even hide from the enemies in addition to providing them a safety valve in the testing weather.

Inner trousers, green coloured jacket, white colour jacket along with specialized shoes and three different sets of dark coloured trousers comprise the layers of the clothing given to soldiers deployed in high-altitude areas.

Even the tents provided to them consist of heaters, waterproof covers on the outside, and of an inside layer made of quilt to maintain warmness on the inside. Solar panels have been installed in the tents to provide electricity to the troops and the claim is that these equipment will look after the well-being of the soldiers even in the temperature falls to -50 degrees.

Oil depots have been stocked to prevent any shortage of the same and supply adequate fuel to the forces for their operations. The Indian Army is being prepared for a busy winter ahead in Ladakh as the possibility of a long-drawn conflict with China looms larger than ever currently
 

samsaptaka

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I still have an issue with our chaps using the term “afghan invaders” in this case, it’s the afghans who were natives and brits who were invaders.
Astonishing tale of bravery, taking nothing away from their supreme sacrifice, but what was the cause they were fighting for ? For the evil empire . In the end they fought for the brothers standing beside them. What a waste of fine men, fie on the British Empire ! Hence the necessity to learn from Mhb and karnas tragedy, if you fight on the side of adharma, its a pointless cause. Do not become a mercenary and fight for money, there should always be a greater good for which its worthy to shed blood. This has always been the hindu outlook .
 

12arya

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Astonishing tale of bravery, taking nothing away from their supreme sacrifice, but what was the cause they were fighting for ? For the evil empire . In the end they fought for the brothers standing beside them. What a waste of fine men, fie on the British Empire ! Hence the necessity to learn from Mhb and karnas tragedy, if you fight on the side of adharma, its a pointless cause. Do not become a mercenary and fight for money, there should always be a greater good for which its worthy to shed blood. This has always been the hindu outlook .
ya bro. none of us wud want to glorify those evil empirewallahs! and i don't think our Armed forces nor any us who r celebrating this particular war for that.

as u said, those men fought for their fellow brothers. again, i won't call them mercenaries or fighting for money; i feel those guys didn't had much option at that point in time. we can't judge them with our situation. they took whatever opportunity that came their way yet upheld the honour of our culture.

Yes, Karna's eg: u stated is indeed perfect but Karna as well as these Sikh gents acquitted themselves thru their nobility...they fought to death. Neither Karna not these brave Sikhs had any personal gain; they only lost yet they fought and died with honour; we need to appreciate that.

As Narada says to yudhishthira, Karna was born to show the world what nobility can be even under tragic circumstances. And Krishna compares Karna to Shiva himself and Karna knew he was gonna die and refused the throne twice!

Our epics r all abt the grey zone; there is no black or white in it. Even Duryodhana attains Swarga since he fought bravely, and his birth was to bring in the end of Kurus. Pepl admire Karna and Bheeshma and Meghanada coz they were flawed yet noble. We shouldn't fall into the abhrahmic trap of gud and evil dichotomy; we delve into so much more.
 

12arya

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Explained: How Indian Army is screening women officers for Permanent Commission

The Army has recently tweaked its physical fitness policy for women officers, who are no longer exempt from Battle Physical Efficiency Test (BPET).

SC ruling on permanent commission to women army officers, women in army, indian army role for women, women in combat,


According to recent figures, there are 1,653 women officers currently serving in the Army out of a total of nearly 43,000 officers.

The Army has constituted a special screening board to select women officers for Permanent Commission. This follows the Supreme Court’s landmark verdict in February this year, allowing all women officers to seek Permanent Commission in the Army.

Here is a look at what this means for the women officers wearing the olive greens:

How is the screening board for women officers constituted?

The Number 5 Selection Board has been constituted by the Army pursuant to the Supreme Court’s February 2020 order, directing the Army to induct all eligible women officers as permanent commission officers. The special board came into effect on September 14. The board is headed by a Senior General Officer and includes a woman officer of the rank of Brigadier. Women officers have been permitted to witness the proceedings as observers in order to add transparency to the process.

Women officers who qualify in the screening process will be granted Permanent Commission subject to being in the acceptable medical category.

What was the matter under adjudication in the Supreme Court?

Induction of women officers in the Army had been initiated in 1992, when the then government set the ball rolling for induction of women officers in select non-combat branches.
In 2008, the then government extended the Permanent Commission to women in two branches — Army Education Corps and Judge Advocate General.


The women soldiers are on deputation from the Assam Rifles, India’s oldest paramilitary force over which the Army has operational control. (Express Photo by Shuaib Masoodi)

In 2010, the Delhi High Court awarded the Permanent Commission to women officers in all branches in which they were serving but the government appealed against this order in the Supreme Court. The verdict in the matter came in February this year.

It is pertinent to mention here that the present government has granted Permanent Commission to women in all ten branches in which they were serving in March 2019, but this offer was not to be implemented retrospectively. This meant that a large number of women officers still serving as Short Service Commission (SSC) officers would not be eligible for the Permanent Commission. As SSC officers they could serve for a maximum of 14 years in the Army, however, the SC order paved the way for them to be considered for Permanent Commission. A screening board has, therefore, been constituted for the purpose.

How many women officers are currently serving in the Army and in what branches?

According to recent figures, there are 1,653 women officers currently serving in the Army out of a total of nearly 43,000 officers. Apart from the Judge Advocate General’s branch and Army Education Corps where Permanent Commission was already given, the eight other branches to get women officers as permanent commissioned officers are Signals, Engineers, Military Intelligence, Army Air Defence, Army Ordnance Corps, Army Service Corps, Army Aviation Corps and Corps of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering.


According to recent figures, there are 1,653 women officers currently serving in the Army out of a total of nearly 43,000 officers.

What are the physical fitness standards required for women officers seeking Permanent Commission?

The Army has recently tweaked its physical fitness policy for women officers after the Supreme Court verdict. Changing its policy regarding applicability of Battle Physical Efficiency Test (BPET) for women officers/women cadets/women recruits, the Army has made it mandatory for all women officers, including those commissioned before 2009 and above 35 years of age, who were earlier exempt from it.

The BPET is a series of physical tests that are meant to test the physical fitness of an officer or a jawan to perform military tasks. For women officers, this includes a five-km run, a 60-metre sprint, climbing vertical rope up to a certain height, traversing horizontal rope up to a certain distance and jumping 6-feet ditch.
These new directions supersede the directions issued by Army Headquarters in March 2011, which said, “Lady officers, who are commissioned before April 2009 and are above 35 years of age, will be excused from BPET and only Physical Proficiency Test (PPT) will be applicable for them.”


Are there any other eligibility conditions for grant of Permanent Commission to women officers?

After the Supreme Court order on February 17, 2020 granting Permanent Commission to all women officers with all consequential benefits, the Army has started detailing women officers of the rank of Lt Colonels for Junior Command (JC) course at Army War College, Mhow, so that they are eligible for Permanent Commission. Women officers had been asked to attend the courses being conducted at the college between July and October this year.



This course, which is normally attended by male officers with five to 10 years of service, will now see women officers of much senior service bracket — 15 and 16 years of service and more — attending it.

This course, which is normally attended by male officers with five to 10 years of service, will now see women officers of much senior service bracket — 15 and 16 years of service and more — attending it. According to the directions of the Director General Military Training (DGMT), consequent to the SC order, the women officers considered for Permanent Commission will have to undergo mandatory courses of their respective branches along with JC course.
 

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