Indian Army Armored Vehicles

Dark Sorrow

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Yes you hit the right spot there are some chances but Russia won't be happy and this will bring Russia closer to Pakistan which India won't like
Raisina Hill has accepted strategic decoupling of ties with Russia in intermediate future.
Raisina Hill has also accepted quasi-alliance between Russia, PRC and Pakistan is an unavoidable fact.
Hence realignment of India's strategic posturing is in order.
 

ezsasa

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Spotted m4 kalyani and a mounted howitzer. Location Delhi chd highway. View attachment 155054View attachment 155055View attachment 155056

It wasn't an army convoy. There was another vehicle but couldn't get a proper picture.


View attachment 155057
they are probably coming back from North Tech defence expo

View attachment 154696View attachment 154697
Pic 1
Bharat Forge equipment displayed, from left:
TC-20 155mm/39 gun system
Garuda-105
Garuda-105 V2 (both are 105mm/37)
M4
Pic 2
A glimpse of the TC-20 again, along with vehicles by Polaris Defense
 

WolfPack86

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TASL Pulls Into Lead With Combat Wheeled Armoured Vehicles Delivery To Army
The delivery of the first batch of 8X8 Infantry Protected Mobility Vehicles (IPMV) by Tata Advanced Systems Limited (TASL) to the Indian Army is the first instance of an indigenously developed combat-ready 8X8 wheeled armoured vehicle entering service with the army.

The army took delivery of the impressive looking vehicles at its Bombay Engineering Group Centre in Pune, along with the delivery of 4X4 Quick Reaction Fighting Vehicles (QRFV) also from TASL, at the same event. According to Sukaran Singh, MD & CEO, TASL, the delivery of the IPMV’s marked the first commercial sale of a strategic platform that has been co-developed by DRDO and a private player.

Joint Development

The IPMV results from the Wheeled Armoured Platform (WhAP) programme, initiated by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) in 2012. The basis of the programme was the need to develop a wheeled Infantry Combat Vehicle (ICV) that could be used over hilly terrain.

The development of the 8X8 WhAP was initially undertaken by the Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO) to provide a replacement for the Army’s Russian origin BMP-II tracked armoured personnel carriers (APC), which were first inducted starting in the mid-eighties and are still being built under license in India. The DRDO had also taken up the project to develop a vehicle to meet the APC requirements for United Nations missions.

The WhAP was intended to be a common platform on which armoured vehicles for various roles would be developed, such as wheeled APC, 30 mm ICV, 105 mm light tank, command post vehicle, ambulance, special-purpose platform, 120 mm mortar carrier, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) vehicle.



The defence business of Tata Motors Limited (now under TASL) was selected to partner with the Vehicles Research & Development Establishment (VRDE) to develop the armoured vehicle. As part of the WhAP joint design and development project with DRDO, TASL has gained an unmatched understanding of armoured fighting vehicle technology and grown its existing armoured land systems development capability well beyond that of other Indian private sector firms operating in the defence domain.

The wheeled ICV was named Kestrel during its development by Tata Motors. The first prototype was displayed at DefExpo 2014, and technical inputs were received from Supacat of the UK. The indigenous wheeled armoured platform was configured around two distinct entities in the overall design: the base hull and the modular mission payload; the latter was adopted to user-specific requirements.

Developmental trials of the WhAP were carried out in two phases. On-road and Off-road mobility trials began in October 2014 and were conducted at National Centre for Automotive Testing (NCAT) at VRDE and a vehicle track at the Army’s Mechanized Infantry Regimental Centre (MIRC). During initial trials, the prototype vehicle delivered a fuel efficiency of 1.3 kmpl, giving it a range of 478 km on a full tank of diesel. Amphibious trials commenced in August 2015. In January this year, TASL announced the completion of successful trials in Ladakh.

The decade long design effort has eventually matured into a modular and scalable design, which could cater for a future increase in gross vehicle weight from 22.5 tonne up to 26 tonne without any reduction in performance. The IPMV is powered by a Tata Cummins water-cooled turbocharged diesel engine generating 600 HP at 2,000 rpm and 2,400 Nm of max torque at 1,500-1,700 rpm. As a result, there is no performance deficit in desert and high-altitude areas, and the unique independent hydropneumatic suspension allowed the vehicle to attain a top speed of 100 kmph on land and ten kmph in amphibious mode.

Capability Delivered

APCs are complicated to design and develop due to the myriad challenges of mobility, performance, weight, protection, firepower, etc. The IPMV can carry up to 10 personnel and two crew members. Therefore, the troop compartment has been designed considering crew ergonomics and comprises a firing port and periscopes.

The vehicle combines an integrated blast and ballistic protection system and a V-shaped hull that deflects the explosive effect of mine blasts. The seats inside the vehicle feature a suspended design with mine blast attenuation to protect soldiers from such explosions. The hydraulically operated rear-door ramp enables easy embarking and disembarking of troops. The troops are also provided with two escape hatches above the crew compartment. The IPMV also features air conditioning and heating for improved crew comfort.

TASL has equipped the IPMV with an in-house designed and developed Remote Controlled Weapon Station (RCWS), which is likely to be fitted with a single 7.62 mm co-axial medium machine gun (MMG). The vehicle also features external add-on armour protection panels developed by the Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory of DRDO. The vehicle also features a Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) protection system. TASL has also been contracted by the army to provide 24x7 support to maintain the vehicles at the deployment locations.

Another variant of this 8X8 APC is fitted with a new and state-of-the-art weapons turret with a 30 mm remotely operated cannon and an advanced fire control system. As per the requirement, it can also integrate anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs). This version is also fitted with a laser range finder that can track targets up to 10km away, while a thermal imager sight helps detect, recognise, and identify targets, both during the day and night.

An optional Active Protection System (APS) is also available, which can destroy incoming rockets/projectiles with an explosive charge. A Laser Detection and Warning System protects the vehicle against laser-guided munitions and sighting systems by activating smoke grenades.
 

samsaptaka

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TASL Pulls Into Lead With Combat Wheeled Armoured Vehicles Delivery To Army
The delivery of the first batch of 8X8 Infantry Protected Mobility Vehicles (IPMV) by Tata Advanced Systems Limited (TASL) to the Indian Army is the first instance of an indigenously developed combat-ready 8X8 wheeled armoured vehicle entering service with the army.

The army took delivery of the impressive looking vehicles at its Bombay Engineering Group Centre in Pune, along with the delivery of 4X4 Quick Reaction Fighting Vehicles (QRFV) also from TASL, at the same event. According to Sukaran Singh, MD & CEO, TASL, the delivery of the IPMV’s marked the first commercial sale of a strategic platform that has been co-developed by DRDO and a private player.

Joint Development

The IPMV results from the Wheeled Armoured Platform (WhAP) programme, initiated by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) in 2012. The basis of the programme was the need to develop a wheeled Infantry Combat Vehicle (ICV) that could be used over hilly terrain.

The development of the 8X8 WhAP was initially undertaken by the Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO) to provide a replacement for the Army’s Russian origin BMP-II tracked armoured personnel carriers (APC), which were first inducted starting in the mid-eighties and are still being built under license in India. The DRDO had also taken up the project to develop a vehicle to meet the APC requirements for United Nations missions.

The WhAP was intended to be a common platform on which armoured vehicles for various roles would be developed, such as wheeled APC, 30 mm ICV, 105 mm light tank, command post vehicle, ambulance, special-purpose platform, 120 mm mortar carrier, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) vehicle.



The defence business of Tata Motors Limited (now under TASL) was selected to partner with the Vehicles Research & Development Establishment (VRDE) to develop the armoured vehicle. As part of the WhAP joint design and development project with DRDO, TASL has gained an unmatched understanding of armoured fighting vehicle technology and grown its existing armoured land systems development capability well beyond that of other Indian private sector firms operating in the defence domain.

The wheeled ICV was named Kestrel during its development by Tata Motors. The first prototype was displayed at DefExpo 2014, and technical inputs were received from Supacat of the UK. The indigenous wheeled armoured platform was configured around two distinct entities in the overall design: the base hull and the modular mission payload; the latter was adopted to user-specific requirements.

Developmental trials of the WhAP were carried out in two phases. On-road and Off-road mobility trials began in October 2014 and were conducted at National Centre for Automotive Testing (NCAT) at VRDE and a vehicle track at the Army’s Mechanized Infantry Regimental Centre (MIRC). During initial trials, the prototype vehicle delivered a fuel efficiency of 1.3 kmpl, giving it a range of 478 km on a full tank of diesel. Amphibious trials commenced in August 2015. In January this year, TASL announced the completion of successful trials in Ladakh.

The decade long design effort has eventually matured into a modular and scalable design, which could cater for a future increase in gross vehicle weight from 22.5 tonne up to 26 tonne without any reduction in performance. The IPMV is powered by a Tata Cummins water-cooled turbocharged diesel engine generating 600 HP at 2,000 rpm and 2,400 Nm of max torque at 1,500-1,700 rpm. As a result, there is no performance deficit in desert and high-altitude areas, and the unique independent hydropneumatic suspension allowed the vehicle to attain a top speed of 100 kmph on land and ten kmph in amphibious mode.

Capability Delivered

APCs are complicated to design and develop due to the myriad challenges of mobility, performance, weight, protection, firepower, etc. The IPMV can carry up to 10 personnel and two crew members. Therefore, the troop compartment has been designed considering crew ergonomics and comprises a firing port and periscopes.

The vehicle combines an integrated blast and ballistic protection system and a V-shaped hull that deflects the explosive effect of mine blasts. The seats inside the vehicle feature a suspended design with mine blast attenuation to protect soldiers from such explosions. The hydraulically operated rear-door ramp enables easy embarking and disembarking of troops. The troops are also provided with two escape hatches above the crew compartment. The IPMV also features air conditioning and heating for improved crew comfort.

TASL has equipped the IPMV with an in-house designed and developed Remote Controlled Weapon Station (RCWS), which is likely to be fitted with a single 7.62 mm co-axial medium machine gun (MMG). The vehicle also features external add-on armour protection panels developed by the Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory of DRDO. The vehicle also features a Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) protection system. TASL has also been contracted by the army to provide 24x7 support to maintain the vehicles at the deployment locations.

Another variant of this 8X8 APC is fitted with a new and state-of-the-art weapons turret with a 30 mm remotely operated cannon and an advanced fire control system. As per the requirement, it can also integrate anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs). This version is also fitted with a laser range finder that can track targets up to 10km away, while a thermal imager sight helps detect, recognise, and identify targets, both during the day and night.

An optional Active Protection System (APS) is also available, which can destroy incoming rockets/projectiles with an explosive charge. A Laser Detection and Warning System protects the vehicle against laser-guided munitions and sighting systems by activating smoke grenades.
Something is seriously wrong in the way IA trials domestic products. Trials started in 2014 ! It shouldn't take 8 years to induct something, that too in paltry numbers and no commitment to a fixed number of orders .
 

WolfPack86

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DAC approved 105 WhAP for the Indian Army equipped with ATGMs

The Defense Acquisition Council (DAC) has approved proposal for the procurement of 105 Wheeled Armoured Platforms (WhAP) with Anti-Tank Guided Missiles (ATGMs).

The 8x8 Wheeled Armored Platform (WhAP) will soon be integrated with Nag Anti Tank Missiles so that it can target Armoured Infantry Vehicles and Light Tanks.

The Anti-Tank WhAP variant will also be Armed with Remote Controlled Weapon Station with thermal sights and external add-on Armor Protection Panels.

The proposal for development of a Wheeled Tank Destroyer with 105 millimeters gun based on WhAP platform is also under consideration for operations in high altitude areas.
 

pipebomb

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I have a question related to force gurkha used by Indian sf. Why a ladder frame chassis is given preference over a monocoque since weight is a premium in lsv role. Is it for financial reasons and commonality with comercial product . Most sf around the world have gone the opposite direction and picked monocoque design
 

WolfPack86

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The DAC on July 2, 2020 approved BMP-2 Armament Upgrade for the IA. The upgrade wasn't listed among indigenously developed weapon systems so it could be the kit based Russian Berezhok upgrade that can be implemented at low cost and in short time.
 

SUPERPOWER

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The DAC on July 2, 2020 approved BMP-2 Armament Upgrade for the IA. The upgrade wasn't listed among indigenously developed weapon systems so it could be the kit based Russian Berezhok upgrade that can be implemented at low cost and in short time.
Yes offcourse the same thing is going to happen to ATAGS, TAPAS, LCH, DHANUSH test test and test and at the time of friction there will be a emergency purchase..Indian Money Guzzling Genrols...
 

flanker99

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Yes offcourse the same thing is going to happen to ATAGS, TAPAS, LCH, DHANUSH test test and test and at the time of friction there will be a emergency purchase..Indian Money Guzzling Genrols...
It is from 2020...testing aside most upgraded will be indigenous with see through armor and all
 

pipebomb

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I have a question related to force gurkha used by Indian sf. Why a ladder frame chassis is given preference over a monocoque since weight is a premium in lsv role. Is it for financial reasons and commonality with comercial product . Most sf around the world have gone the opposite direction and picked monocoque design
FWRh_67X0AApgoU.jpeg

This looks like a monocoque construction
 

STORE

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I have a question related to force gurkha used by Indian sf. Why a ladder frame chassis is given preference over a monocoque since weight is a premium in lsv role. Is it for financial reasons and commonality with comercial product . Most sf around the world have gone the opposite direction and picked monocoque design
It's more offroad capable , much easy to repair ,cost less & more regid compared to monocoque. Most capable offroad SUVs r ladder frame chassis
 
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pipebomb

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It's more offroad capable , much easy to repair ,cost less & more regid compared to monocoque. Most capable offroad SUVs r ladder frame chassis
Ladder frame chassis are most definitely are easy to repair. I think commonality with a mass production vehicle make sourcing of spare easy since vehicle procured are in limited quantity.
Here is another one, polaris dagor
images.jpeg
 

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