India US Relations

Sanglamorre

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Bengal there may be understanding at lower levels among lotus and hammer sickle against didis party.
The understanding is between hammer-sickle and Grass against Lotus. The #NoVote2BJP thing was a result of this where the left transferred their votes to TMC
 

hurrians

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If v r to alleviate the troubles caused by a mighty eagle in a neighbouring country , what's the harm in befriending the grass.

Then again when we go back time split from Inc for sharad,mamata and sanghma was on issue of madam. Most nationalist were against a foreign born pm.


A border state pm shud always be our friend.
 

Roshan

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FPJ Exclusive: 'India Does'nt Know If Its Nuclear Weapons Will Deliver Necessary Results', Says Ex-US Air Force Col Raymond Powell

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Colonel Raymond M. Powell, U.S. Air Force (Retired) is the founder and director of SeaLight, a maritime transparency project launched at the Gordian Knot Center for National Security Innovation at Stanford University. He was in Mumbai to attend a seminar on global security organised by think tank Brahma Research Foundation on Sunday.


His “assertive transparency” initiative has received international acclaim for drawing public attention to China’s maritime gray-zone strategy. It also became the basis for the Philippines’ recent information operations campaign against China’s coercive activities in the South China Sea.

Colonel Powell’s extensive military background includes senior operational, policy and diplomatic roles, including as the U.S. Senior Defense Official/Defense Attaché to Australia from 2017-20, and as the U.S. Air Attaché to Vietnam from 2013-16. He served three Pentagon tours, combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, and in a host of other roles across Asia, Europe and the Middle East. He was in Mumbai to attend a seminar on global security organised by think tank Brahma Reserach Foundation on Sunday.

He spoke exclusively to the FPJ on Tuesday. Excerpts from an interview:


Despite the growing ties between India and the U.S., a strong element of trust deficit still persists between the two democracies. Please comment.

During the Cold War, the U.S. attention was focussed on the USSR and it took on Pakistan and other countries as its allies to counter Moscow. India had its own compulsions in being close to the USSR and it pursued a policy of non-alignment. It did not want to cosy up to any one big power. The U.S. has not entirely adjusted to the new reality. But what is important is that now both the nations have a common interest in containing China and have hence become much closer to each other than at anytime in the past.

How serious is the threat posed by China?

China is nursing ambitions of a revisionist power wanting to dominate the world. This poses a danger to not only to the U.S. and India, but to several other countries. The U.S. is now consciously giving more importance to India which has a crucial role in containing Chinese expansionism. Not only at the strategic level, even at the level of business the U.S. is now diverting supply chains and manufacturing to India. China poses a threat both in the short term and in the long run for international peace and the sovereignty of nations. Beijing is using its financial muscle to influence small nations and through projects like the Belt & Road Initiative it is planning to eat into the sovereignty of nations. That is why the U.S. offers an alternative to these nations. On the cyber front too China is known to hack into computers in other nations and steal vital data. The need is to express outrage against the vicious tactics being employed by China to enlarge its spheres of influence. Taiwan could be a flash point, but the U.S. is committed to ensure the independence of that nation. In south east Asia too China is building artificial islands and posting a threat to nations in that region. But countries like the Philippines are hitting back.


Does India's romance with non-alignment pose an irritant in further deeping Indo-U.S. ties? There is this saying that those who stand on the middle of the road, get run over.

One advantage of non-alignment is that it gives a nation leverage to deal with large power blocs. May be this is what India is doing. But the ground reality has changed substantially since the Cold War days and hence there is a new dynamic to ties between Washington DC and New Delhi.

The Indo-U.S. Nuclear Treaty has effectively put a cap on India's nuclear programme. India has not been able to conduct a single nuclear test ever since it signed the treaty. In the absence of testing, India does not know if its nuclear weapons will deliver necessary results in case of an emergency. Please comment.

The nuclear deal was entered into as a part of larger efforts to restrict nuclear proliferation. The less the number of nuclear-armed states the better it is for world peace. If nuclear proliferation by states like Iran and other unstable regimes go unchecked then it will have grave implications for the global security situation.

How stable is China internally?

It has an autocratic regime which politicises everything under the sun. The Chinese government need to worry about threats from its own people who are controlled by the Communist regime in every which way.
How would this guy know?
 

Ugra Bhairav

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Who is this Nikhil Gupta and what TeleCon Intercept do the US Deep State has with this "So Called" Indian Official ???


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Just two months after India brushed off the shocking accusation that it had orchestrated the assassination of a Sikh Canadian activist, the subcontinent now faces another, similar allegation—this time from its close ally, the United States, in the form of a formal indictment.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Justice announced that it was charging an Indian citizen and alleged spy named Nikhil Gupta for attempting to murder a different Sikh activist in New York City, shortly after Canadian citizen Hardeep Singh Nijjar was killed in British Columbia by two anonymous gunmen. According to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, Gupta was hired by an unnamed Indian government employee who coordinated an effort from his country to kill “an attorney and political activist who is a U.S. citizen of lndian origin.” Like Nijjar, this particular U.S. citizen was involved with the Khalistan movement, a decades-old separatist effort to carve out historically Sikh-populated lands in North India and establish an autonomous state.

The DOJ’s filing does not name the U.S. citizen, but the Financial Times, citing anonymous sources, reported last week that the alleged target was the dual U.S.-Canada citizen Gurpatwant Singh Pannun, founder of and counsel to the pro-Khalistan Sikhs for Justice organization. The FT found that after U.S. officials thwarted the assassination attempt, they issued a “diplomatic warning” to the Indian government over its likely involvement, with President Joe Biden himself reportedly confronting Prime Minister Narendra Modi about the plot against Pannun (as well as the shooting of Nijjar) at the September G20 summit in New Delhi. The DOJ then prepared a sealed indictment that it initially planned to open after Canada finished its probe into Nijjar’s murder, which had catalyzed a diplomatic spat between Canada and India. (Over the weekend, India’s ambassador to Canada stated that relations between the two countries were finally on the mend.) It’s likely that Wednesday’s SDNY announcement was spurred by the FT report and its ensuing fallout, which saw India respond to the U.S. in a far less hostile manner than it had to Canada—in this case, mostly expressing “surprise and concern.” The unsealing also represents the most direct statement the U.S. has made over the Indian government’s alleged violence on both Canadian and American soil.

Even before Wednesday’s indictment unveiled further details, the respective sagas in Canada and the U.S. bore some unnerving similarities. Nijjar was also affiliated with Pannun’s Sikhs for Justice, which was established to hold 1980s-era Indian politicians responsible for the genocidal anti-Sikh pogroms of that decade—and was formally banned from India in 2019, after which SFJ began organizing a global Sikh referendum in favor of a Khalistan state. The two SFJ ringleaders were also formally labeled as “terrorists” by India in 2020, with the government requesting that Interpol issue a “red notice” for Pannun’s arrest; the international policing body declined to do so. The U.S. also sent its initial warning to India over the Pannun situation shortly after Modi wrapped up his glamorous stateside visit in late June—barely a week after Nijjar was shot and killed in Canada. And both Canada and the U.S. kept quiet about the alleged crimes until news organizations confronted their respective governments (in Canada’s case, the Globe and Mail newspaper). Even after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau declared to the Canadian Parliament that there were “credible allegations of a potential link between agents of the government of India” and the murder of Nijjar, the U.S. kept its own concerns muted until last week’s FT article. Pannun himself spoke with Time magazine for an interview published Monday, claiming he’s never sought to replicate the violence that militant Khalistan advocates had carried out in the past (which culminated in the horrific 1985 bombing of an Air India flight from Montreal that killed 329 people) and that his home country was pursuing him and SFJ for “fighting India’s violence with votes.”

With the DOJ’s opened indictment, which pinpoints the existence of a hired assassin, we’ve now learned even more chilling details regarding the attempt on Pannun’s life—and its connections to what went down in Canada. Here’s what the Biden administration has uncovered.

• Beginning in early May, an Indian government employee—self-described as a “senior field officer” involved with “security management” and “intelligence”—reached out to Nikhil Gupta with a quid pro quo. If Gupta could arrange a hit on Pannun in the United States, the government agent would help to dismiss a criminal case that had been lodged against Gupta in the Indian state of Gujarat. Gupta and the official met in person in the capital of New Delhi and traded various encrypted phone messages in English, with Gupta saving the official’s name as a contact under an alias. On May 6, the official informed Gupta that they had targets in both New York and California, both of which Gupta pledged to “hit”; later, the official promised Gupta that he no longer had to worry about his Gujarat case.

• Near the end of May, “at [the official’s] direction,” Gupta contacted a potential accomplice who was actually “a confidential source working with U.S. law enforcement,” reportedly for the Drug Enforcement Administration. When Gupta asked them who could arrange a Pannun murder-for-hire, this source presented an undercover law enforcement officer to Gupta as a hit man; Gupta arranged for the Indian official to pay this “hit man” $100,000 to take Pannun out, with $15,000 paid upfront to the “hit man” in early June.

• Around that time, the Indian official provided Gupta with all the information he’d need to locate and snuff out Pannun, which Gupta passed on to the “hit man,” who was also warned not to kill Pannun too close to Modi’s state visit in the U.S.

• In mid-June, Gupta told both the source and the “hit man” that if Pannun’s murder happened soon and swiftly, Gupta’s associates would provide “additional victims to kill” at the rate of two to three hit jobs a month. Gupta also alluded to a “big target” in Canada, telling the source that “We are doing their New York [and] Canada [job]”—the latter of which, Gupta later confirmed, was referring to Hardeep Singh Nijjar.

• “Just hours after the Nijjar murder” on June 18, the Indian official “sent Gupta a video clip that showed Nijjar’s bloody body slumped in his vehicle,” which Gupta then forwarded to both the source and the “hit man.” A day later, Gupta informed the latter that Nijjar was also ranked highly on his target list, which included “so many” people. Gupta also told the undercover officer not to hold back when going to kill Pannun: If there happened to be multiple people at the site, “put everyone down.”

• One day after Nijjar’s murder, per the Washington Post, a Sacramento-based Sikh named Bobby Singh received an FBI call warning of a threat to his life, making it likely that he was one of the “many” people included in Gupta’s lists, and was perhaps even the aforementioned “California target.”

• On June 20, the Indian official “sent Gupta a news article about [Pannun] and messaged Gupta, ‘It’s priority now.’ ” Gupta then told the source that “we have to finish four jobs” before June 29, including Pannun and three additional Canadian targets.

• On June 30, Gupta traveled to the Czech Republic and was detained there at the request of the U.S. government. Gupta remains there now, but will probably be extradited to the U.S. as the case proceeds.

This indictment is extremely, extremely concerning. It demonstrates that at least one Indian government official had no compunction about pursuing more Canadian Sikhs so soon after Nijjar’s murder, that such conspirators actively attempted to avoid any associations with Modi by scheduling the plot around the time span of his U.S. visit, and that there are far more global Sikhs and Khalistan activists who are in danger, many of whom (like Nijjar and Pannun) have lived in North America for decades and have given their surveillance-happy Western governments no cause for concern. Indeed, the Khalistan movement has not engaged in any terrorism since the 1990s, and many of its most prominent adherents have not stepped foot in India for years. Yet, in tandem with its crackdowns on dissent and activism within subcontinental borders, officials within the Indian government are determined to wipe out Khalistan momentum at all costs—even if that involves assassinating foreign citizens in foreign lands. The increasing Hindu nationalist influence in American politics has already played out on a legislative and diplomatic level; now it’s reached nothing less than bloody. The Washington Post reports that multiple high-level Biden administration officials have confronted their Indian counterparts about the attempted hit against Pannun since August. Yet one wonders what it will actually take for the U.S., which has embraced the Modi government closely, to realize its ally may not be working in America’s best interest.
 

Ugra Bhairav

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Who is this Nikhil Gupta and what TeleCon Intercept do the US Deep State has with this "So Called" Indian Official ???


View attachment 230515

View attachment 230516


Just two months after India brushed off the shocking accusation that it had orchestrated the assassination of a Sikh Canadian activist, the subcontinent now faces another, similar allegation—this time from its close ally, the United States, in the form of a formal indictment.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Justice announced that it was charging an Indian citizen and alleged spy named Nikhil Gupta for attempting to murder a different Sikh activist in New York City, shortly after Canadian citizen Hardeep Singh Nijjar was killed in British Columbia by two anonymous gunmen. According to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, Gupta was hired by an unnamed Indian government employee who coordinated an effort from his country to kill “an attorney and political activist who is a U.S. citizen of lndian origin.” Like Nijjar, this particular U.S. citizen was involved with the Khalistan movement, a decades-old separatist effort to carve out historically Sikh-populated lands in North India and establish an autonomous state.

The DOJ’s filing does not name the U.S. citizen, but the Financial Times, citing anonymous sources, reported last week that the alleged target was the dual U.S.-Canada citizen Gurpatwant Singh Pannun, founder of and counsel to the pro-Khalistan Sikhs for Justice organization. The FT found that after U.S. officials thwarted the assassination attempt, they issued a “diplomatic warning” to the Indian government over its likely involvement, with President Joe Biden himself reportedly confronting Prime Minister Narendra Modi about the plot against Pannun (as well as the shooting of Nijjar) at the September G20 summit in New Delhi. The DOJ then prepared a sealed indictment that it initially planned to open after Canada finished its probe into Nijjar’s murder, which had catalyzed a diplomatic spat between Canada and India. (Over the weekend, India’s ambassador to Canada stated that relations between the two countries were finally on the mend.) It’s likely that Wednesday’s SDNY announcement was spurred by the FT report and its ensuing fallout, which saw India respond to the U.S. in a far less hostile manner than it had to Canada—in this case, mostly expressing “surprise and concern.” The unsealing also represents the most direct statement the U.S. has made over the Indian government’s alleged violence on both Canadian and American soil.

Even before Wednesday’s indictment unveiled further details, the respective sagas in Canada and the U.S. bore some unnerving similarities. Nijjar was also affiliated with Pannun’s Sikhs for Justice, which was established to hold 1980s-era Indian politicians responsible for the genocidal anti-Sikh pogroms of that decade—and was formally banned from India in 2019, after which SFJ began organizing a global Sikh referendum in favor of a Khalistan state. The two SFJ ringleaders were also formally labeled as “terrorists” by India in 2020, with the government requesting that Interpol issue a “red notice” for Pannun’s arrest; the international policing body declined to do so. The U.S. also sent its initial warning to India over the Pannun situation shortly after Modi wrapped up his glamorous stateside visit in late June—barely a week after Nijjar was shot and killed in Canada. And both Canada and the U.S. kept quiet about the alleged crimes until news organizations confronted their respective governments (in Canada’s case, the Globe and Mail newspaper). Even after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau declared to the Canadian Parliament that there were “credible allegations of a potential link between agents of the government of India” and the murder of Nijjar, the U.S. kept its own concerns muted until last week’s FT article. Pannun himself spoke with Time magazine for an interview published Monday, claiming he’s never sought to replicate the violence that militant Khalistan advocates had carried out in the past (which culminated in the horrific 1985 bombing of an Air India flight from Montreal that killed 329 people) and that his home country was pursuing him and SFJ for “fighting India’s violence with votes.”

With the DOJ’s opened indictment, which pinpoints the existence of a hired assassin, we’ve now learned even more chilling details regarding the attempt on Pannun’s life—and its connections to what went down in Canada. Here’s what the Biden administration has uncovered.

• Beginning in early May, an Indian government employee—self-described as a “senior field officer” involved with “security management” and “intelligence”—reached out to Nikhil Gupta with a quid pro quo. If Gupta could arrange a hit on Pannun in the United States, the government agent would help to dismiss a criminal case that had been lodged against Gupta in the Indian state of Gujarat. Gupta and the official met in person in the capital of New Delhi and traded various encrypted phone messages in English, with Gupta saving the official’s name as a contact under an alias. On May 6, the official informed Gupta that they had targets in both New York and California, both of which Gupta pledged to “hit”; later, the official promised Gupta that he no longer had to worry about his Gujarat case.

• Near the end of May, “at [the official’s] direction,” Gupta contacted a potential accomplice who was actually “a confidential source working with U.S. law enforcement,” reportedly for the Drug Enforcement Administration. When Gupta asked them who could arrange a Pannun murder-for-hire, this source presented an undercover law enforcement officer to Gupta as a hit man; Gupta arranged for the Indian official to pay this “hit man” $100,000 to take Pannun out, with $15,000 paid upfront to the “hit man” in early June.

• Around that time, the Indian official provided Gupta with all the information he’d need to locate and snuff out Pannun, which Gupta passed on to the “hit man,” who was also warned not to kill Pannun too close to Modi’s state visit in the U.S.

• In mid-June, Gupta told both the source and the “hit man” that if Pannun’s murder happened soon and swiftly, Gupta’s associates would provide “additional victims to kill” at the rate of two to three hit jobs a month. Gupta also alluded to a “big target” in Canada, telling the source that “We are doing their New York [and] Canada [job]”—the latter of which, Gupta later confirmed, was referring to Hardeep Singh Nijjar.

• “Just hours after the Nijjar murder” on June 18, the Indian official “sent Gupta a video clip that showed Nijjar’s bloody body slumped in his vehicle,” which Gupta then forwarded to both the source and the “hit man.” A day later, Gupta informed the latter that Nijjar was also ranked highly on his target list, which included “so many” people. Gupta also told the undercover officer not to hold back when going to kill Pannun: If there happened to be multiple people at the site, “put everyone down.”

• One day after Nijjar’s murder, per the Washington Post, a Sacramento-based Sikh named Bobby Singh received an FBI call warning of a threat to his life, making it likely that he was one of the “many” people included in Gupta’s lists, and was perhaps even the aforementioned “California target.”

• On June 20, the Indian official “sent Gupta a news article about [Pannun] and messaged Gupta, ‘It’s priority now.’ ” Gupta then told the source that “we have to finish four jobs” before June 29, including Pannun and three additional Canadian targets.

• On June 30, Gupta traveled to the Czech Republic and was detained there at the request of the U.S. government. Gupta remains there now, but will probably be extradited to the U.S. as the case proceeds.

This indictment is extremely, extremely concerning. It demonstrates that at least one Indian government official had no compunction about pursuing more Canadian Sikhs so soon after Nijjar’s murder, that such conspirators actively attempted to avoid any associations with Modi by scheduling the plot around the time span of his U.S. visit, and that there are far more global Sikhs and Khalistan activists who are in danger, many of whom (like Nijjar and Pannun) have lived in North America for decades and have given their surveillance-happy Western governments no cause for concern. Indeed, the Khalistan movement has not engaged in any terrorism since the 1990s, and many of its most prominent adherents have not stepped foot in India for years. Yet, in tandem with its crackdowns on dissent and activism within subcontinental borders, officials within the Indian government are determined to wipe out Khalistan momentum at all costs—even if that involves assassinating foreign citizens in foreign lands. The increasing Hindu nationalist influence in American politics has already played out on a legislative and diplomatic level; now it’s reached nothing less than bloody. The Washington Post reports that multiple high-level Biden administration officials have confronted their Indian counterparts about the attempted hit against Pannun since August. Yet one wonders what it will actually take for the U.S., which has embraced the Modi government closely, to realize its ally may not be working in America’s best interest.
All and all it seems like "HIT JOB" by US Deep State to tame India.

Lets see how this saga pans out.
 

TopWatcher

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All and all it seems like "HIT JOB" by US Deep State to tame India.

Lets see how this saga pans out.
I think US is like a mood swing guy. One day they think let go make INdia a friend, other day US is on top lets tame them.

Actaully US having a mood swing problem.
 

Ugra Bhairav

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I think US is like a mood swing guy. One day they think let go make INdia a friend, other day US is on top lets tame them.

Actaully US having a mood swing problem.
It is about creating leverage and saving Own Assets.

i.e. malign India on World Stage and extracting some favour from India. (Which is not known till now i.e. how US is going use this as leaver for extracting Undue favour by Arm Twisting India).

And save its own Assets i.e. Khalistanis to create disturbances along the faultlines in Indian Society.

Here specific USA asset is gurpatwant sing pannu.
 

TopWatcher

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It is about creating leverage and saving Own Assets.

i.e. malign India on World Stage and extracting some favour from India. (Which is not known till now i.e. how US is going use this as leaver for extracting Undue favour by Arm Twisting India).

And save its own Assets i.e. Khalistanis to create disturbances along the faultlines in Indian Society.

Here specific USA asset is gurpatwant sing pannu.
Than its seems pannu very much importance to them. So means US already knows what canada going to do. After G20 these things start happening.
 

TopWatcher

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It is about creating leverage and saving Own Assets.

i.e. malign India on World Stage and extracting some favour from India. (Which is not known till now i.e. how US is going use this as leaver for extracting Undue favour by Arm Twisting India).

And save its own Assets i.e. Khalistanis to create disturbances along the faultlines in Indian Society.

Here specific USA asset is gurpatwant sing pannu.
Then i think INdia should make a deal with US. Ask US to wipe out khalisssssstnnnn movement,in turn india will not do anything,
 

Ugra Bhairav

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Than its seems pannu very much importance to them. So means US already knows what canada going to do. After G20 these things start happening.
The Nikhil Gupta was trapped way back in June-2023 and thats why Turd of Canada was croaking about Indian Involvement in Nijjar's assassination.

But that turd and his country never had any information on Nijjar.

But was flagged by Amrika Bahadur to go hammers and tongs against India and now what Amrika Bahadur had planned is now panning out.

Lets see if India been brought down to its Knees......

Or India Stands and takes up the challenge.

THis case is going to be test of India been Major Power on World Stage.
 

TopWatcher

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The Nikhil Gupta was trapped way back in June-2023 and thats why Turd of Canada was croaking about Indian Involvement in Nijjar's assassination.

But that turd and his country never had any information on Nijjar.

But was flagged by Amrika Bahadur to go hammers and tongs against India and now what Amrika Bahadur had planned is now panning out.

Lets see if India been brought down to its Knees......

Or India Stands and takes up the challenge.

THis case is going to be test of India been Major Power on World Stage.
US need india more than india need US. But what creating a problem is engine deal with US. This is where india done a wrong calculation. No other option but go with france.
 

TopWatcher

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US need india more than india need US. But what creating a problem is engine deal with US. This is where india done a wrong calculation. No other option but go with france.
Kya hum corona vaccine ki tarah ek saal main engine bana sakte hai :crazy:
 

TopWatcher

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The main crux due to endiaa rising GDP and engineering/scientific capabilities , now US experiencing a problem.
 

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