India-China Border conflict

SwordOfDarkness

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That's a problem if they share the air traffic data over NE with the chinese. Who knows what these Banglus are upto , we must register a diplomatic protest atleast
Reposting from what chinmoy said in the air force thread -

We may have been the gys who asked them to set up the radar in the first place.

 

asaffronladoftherisingsun

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Very much possible, political will is the only requirement
The Indian army has been extended from the raj imperial framework of excess “secularism” which was a cover to keep the army alienated from the native majority and thus make it easier to keep the sheep subjugated to the "secular" regime.

The current Indian state is a confused state with doctrines of political islam.

The fact remains chaddistitchers turning more jihadists and secular elements don't even matter.

The minority weaker Hindu, Buddhist, Christian there be either converted or exiled possibly mostly the men while the women will be kept behind by jihadi chaddistichers as seks-slaves as they did during the Noakhali genocide.

Parts of Nepal, Myanmar are being activated in a systematic and long term manner by subcontinental components of transnational jihad.

The secular state is clueless.

History and current events in syria and libya hold testimony to the fact that secular armies are at severe disadvantage at thwarting the psychologically sophisticated jihadi subhumans.

How do we forget that just in mosul 30k iraqi army lost to bunch of 1500 isil lemmings that were prone to spontaneous detonation. Oh yes the mosul fell in less than a week.
 

Vinash

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Ofc there is a solution.

I just don't think our secular state has the balls to do it. India can strangulate Bangladesh to death by blocking Sea & Air traffic in times of war. But, it's too much to ask from a nation whose psyche has become so cucked that they are always on the defensive.
 

Angel of War

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The Indian army has been extended from the raj imperial framework of excess “secularism” which was a cover to keep the army alienated from the native majority and thus make it easier to keep the sheep subjugated to the "secular" regime.

The current Indian state is a confused state with doctrines of political islam.
Please sir, army is good the way it is with it's current belief structure. You have to remember that not only do we have hindu soldiers but also sikhs , Christians , muslims and Buddhists serving in good numbers. I for one am totally in favour of secularism in the indian army. I've never met a soldier who keeps his religion above his country, for them namak, namak and nishan is the only dharam which they've got to follow. Indian army is a representation of the general indian population including all religions which reside in this country. It's best that the army remains the way it is , respecting troops from all religions is a necessity to maintain cohesion. Army follows the best of traditions and instilling non secular values is equivalent to mixing poison in the well.
 

asaffronladoftherisingsun

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Please sir, army is good the way it is with it's current belief structure. You have to remember that not only do we have hindu soldiers but also sikhs , Christians , muslims and Buddhists serving in good numbers. I for one am totally in favour of secularism in the indian army. I've never met a soldier who keeps his religion above his country, for them namak, namak and nishan is the only dharam which they've got to follow. Indian army is a representation of the general indian population including all religions which reside in this country. It's best that the army remains the way it is , respecting troops from all religions is a necessity to maintain cohesion. Army follows the best of traditions and instilling non secular values is equivalent to mixing poison in the well.
My question is not on army. I am just saying that Hindus in that region particularly should learn to organise themselves for defence militarily in all the ways necessary to tackle forces built along lines of armed jihadist groups without relying too much on existing state armies and defences.
 

Angel of War

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My question is not on army. I am just saying that Hindus in that region particularly should learn to organise themselves for defence militarily in all the ways necessary to tackle forces built along lines of armed jihadist groups without relying too much on existing state armies and defences.
I agree with that. For that hindus need to unite. Our community tends to be very divisive on such matters. The general hindu population in these areas needs to recognize that the threat they face from jihadists is indeed real. Once the survival instinct kicks in they'll definitely defend themselves cause it's in our blood. Invaders have tried to suppress us but when our survival instinct kicks in we give them a hard time. That's why we produced great warriors like Mahrana Pratap and Shivaji Maharaj
 

The Shrike

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cant find anything on this other than the coastal radar that "we" have been pushing on them .

indian OSINT getting shitter by the day .

can anyone find actual news ?
No idea about where this dude got that info but BD bought a few very capable radars (Ground Master 400) from our best friends for ever France recently.
 

The Shrike

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"In November foreign (who - Bhutan?) special forces entered the border from China and India..."
What happened in November? 🤔
Anyone remember any "RUMINT" from that period. Or Shiv Aroor tweeting "Will be breaking massive developments in the Indo-China stand-off at 9PM" and then completed ignoring the any news from the standoff in the actual show :dude: .
 

shade

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WSJ article saying China is very risky now.

Shortly after Chinese leader Xi Jinping reaffirmed his position at the pinnacle of Chinese political power, he faces what could be the biggest test of his tenure.

The outcome could reshape how foreign multinationals operate in China, the flow of global manufacturing investment, and China’s relations with developed democracies. What is more, several fundamental factors leading to this moment are unlikely to fade for the foreseeable future.

For decades, foreign companies operating in China have benefited from access to the country’s massive labor force, in exchange for largely steering clear of politics. Investment-hungry local governments, in turn, have often acted pre-emptively to defuse political problems that might complicate business—particularly independent labor activism, resistance to land acquisition, or other forms of organized protest.

That has been one key factor that has long distinguished China from other potential manufacturing competitors such as India. To the extent that multinational manufacturers worried about political risk, it has primarily been about geopolitics, rather than conditions in China itself.
But the twin protests—over labor conditions and Covid-19 policies—erupting this month represent a serious challenge to two key assumptions underlying this arrangement. First, that companies can count on a fundamental level of political stability when they invest in China. And second, that workers won’t push labor actions too far for fear of state reprisals.


Small-scale local protests in China, particularly over workplace or financial issues, aren’t uncommon. But the violent protests against unpaid bonuses and harsh lockdown conditions that erupted in Apple supplier Foxconn’s Zhengzhou factory in November were notable for their scale, ferocity and the fact that they occurred at a major multinational factory. They also resulted in a clear victory for workers, who received guarantees their contracts would be honored and the option to quit with a 10,000 yuan, equivalent to $1,400, payment.


The separate protests now proliferating across Chinese streets and campuses, triggered by anger over 10 fire deaths in locked-down Xinjiang’s capital Urumqi, involve at least four major cities and have featured, in some cases, direct calls for Mr. Xi to step down.
In both cases the anger is related to China’s harsh Covid-control policies, which have successfully prevented large scale fatalities so far, but often appear arbitrary and cruel.
The unrest is also taking place in the context of deeper changes handing additional leverage to unskilled factory workers—and piling further pressure on China’s already stressed educated youth.

Unemployment in the 16-to-24 age bracket is 18%, in significant part due to Covid-related restrictions, but also due to policies championed by Beijing that have punished previously fast-growing industries such as tech, which used to absorb large numbers of young, educated workers.
At the same time, China’s supply of workers who migrate from rural areas to find work in cities—the backbone of its factory empire—is aging rapidly and looks close to peaking, even as China’s economy has become more dependent on manufacturing and exports in recent years.


All of this adds up to a populace that appears primed to push the envelope with manufacturers and the government in a way that hasn’t been the case for decades. And that fundamental reality leaves Beijing with a deeply unsatisfactory set of policy options— all of which seem likely to further damage the already shaken confidence of multinationals in the country as an indispensable manufacturing hub.
If the government cracks down hard on protesters and further intensifies its already harsh Covid controls, that will pile more political pressure on Western multinationals—and more harsh lockdowns will create further disruption to factory production.
But if Beijing caves to public pressure and eases Covid controls at the margin, the result could easily be large-scale fatalities—a potential trigger for even worse unrest. Success could also embolden student and labor activists to push for further changes.
China is in the midst of its largest Covid outbreak yet, with new cases nationwide at around 40,000, according to official data, up from around a thousand in late October. Meanwhile, only around 40% of China’s roughly 36 million citizens above 80 had received three vaccine shots by mid-2022.
Extrapolating from the disastrous early 2022 outbreak in Hong Kong—which has also struggled to vaccinate its elderly—Capital Economics estimates that an uncontrolled Omicron outbreak in China could kill around 1.5 million citizens in the above-80 age bracket alone.
Whatever happens, it seems clear that China is at a significant inflection point. How the chips will fall remains very difficult to say. But recent developments are likely to further accelerate manufacturers’ plans to diversify away from China, even if this momentous November represents the beginning of the end for China’s commitment to zero Covid.
 

shade

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The Indian army has been extended from the raj imperial framework of excess “secularism” which was a cover to keep the army alienated from the native majority and thus make it easier to keep the sheep subjugated to the "secular" regime.

The current Indian state is a confused state with doctrines of political islam.
It's a section of the Officer class, not the whole organization.
I think in the Army also there is some system where people of the "correct" ideological orientation get the important promotions like the SC (((collegium)))

If it was as suckular as you say here, we'd have 20% Mullahs in the Army to maintain Cheques & Balances.

The biggest flaw with the army brass is the lub of imported maal, and when $$$$ and material comfort is your goal, it doesn't take time for LeLi ideology to creep in
 

SilentlAssassin265

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WSJ article saying China is very risky now.

Shortly after Chinese leader Xi Jinping reaffirmed his position at the pinnacle of Chinese political power, he faces what could be the biggest test of his tenure.

The outcome could reshape how foreign multinationals operate in China, the flow of global manufacturing investment, and China’s relations with developed democracies. What is more, several fundamental factors leading to this moment are unlikely to fade for the foreseeable future.

For decades, foreign companies operating in China have benefited from access to the country’s massive labor force, in exchange for largely steering clear of politics. Investment-hungry local governments, in turn, have often acted pre-emptively to defuse political problems that might complicate business—particularly independent labor activism, resistance to land acquisition, or other forms of organized protest.

That has been one key factor that has long distinguished China from other potential manufacturing competitors such as India. To the extent that multinational manufacturers worried about political risk, it has primarily been about geopolitics, rather than conditions in China itself.
But the twin protests—over labor conditions and Covid-19 policies—erupting this month represent a serious challenge to two key assumptions underlying this arrangement. First, that companies can count on a fundamental level of political stability when they invest in China. And second, that workers won’t push labor actions too far for fear of state reprisals.


Small-scale local protests in China, particularly over workplace or financial issues, aren’t uncommon. But the violent protests against unpaid bonuses and harsh lockdown conditions that erupted in Apple supplier Foxconn’s Zhengzhou factory in November were notable for their scale, ferocity and the fact that they occurred at a major multinational factory. They also resulted in a clear victory for workers, who received guarantees their contracts would be honored and the option to quit with a 10,000 yuan, equivalent to $1,400, payment.


The separate protests now proliferating across Chinese streets and campuses, triggered by anger over 10 fire deaths in locked-down Xinjiang’s capital Urumqi, involve at least four major cities and have featured, in some cases, direct calls for Mr. Xi to step down.
In both cases the anger is related to China’s harsh Covid-control policies, which have successfully prevented large scale fatalities so far, but often appear arbitrary and cruel.
The unrest is also taking place in the context of deeper changes handing additional leverage to unskilled factory workers—and piling further pressure on China’s already stressed educated youth.

Unemployment in the 16-to-24 age bracket is 18%, in significant part due to Covid-related restrictions, but also due to policies championed by Beijing that have punished previously fast-growing industries such as tech, which used to absorb large numbers of young, educated workers.
At the same time, China’s supply of workers who migrate from rural areas to find work in cities—the backbone of its factory empire—is aging rapidly and looks close to peaking, even as China’s economy has become more dependent on manufacturing and exports in recent years.


All of this adds up to a populace that appears primed to push the envelope with manufacturers and the government in a way that hasn’t been the case for decades. And that fundamental reality leaves Beijing with a deeply unsatisfactory set of policy options— all of which seem likely to further damage the already shaken confidence of multinationals in the country as an indispensable manufacturing hub.
If the government cracks down hard on protesters and further intensifies its already harsh Covid controls, that will pile more political pressure on Western multinationals—and more harsh lockdowns will create further disruption to factory production.
But if Beijing caves to public pressure and eases Covid controls at the margin, the result could easily be large-scale fatalities—a potential trigger for even worse unrest. Success could also embolden student and labor activists to push for further changes.
China is in the midst of its largest Covid outbreak yet, with new cases nationwide at around 40,000, according to official data, up from around a thousand in late October. Meanwhile, only around 40% of China’s roughly 36 million citizens above 80 had received three vaccine shots by mid-2022.
Extrapolating from the disastrous early 2022 outbreak in Hong Kong—which has also struggled to vaccinate its elderly—Capital Economics estimates that an uncontrolled Omicron outbreak in China could kill around 1.5 million citizens in the above-80 age bracket alone.
Whatever happens, it seems clear that China is at a significant inflection point. How the chips will fall remains very difficult to say. But recent developments are likely to further accelerate manufacturers’ plans to diversify away from China, even if this momentous November represents the beginning of the end for China’s commitment to zero Covid.
Without it's economy shitna is just a bigger north Korea, this lockdown and protest must be continued for 2 years at least
 

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