India-China 2020 Border conflict

shade

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If you've been following recent developments in NE, infrastructure development is coming up at breakneck speed. And slowly prosperity as well. A lot of NE folks work and study all over India. True the baptist church has spread the us vs them mentality which has aided separation, but I feel we are at a turning point here.

1> GoI seems to be working seriously to do away with foreign funded NGOs which are into all sorts of activism.
2> Missionaries frequently get their visas denied.
3> Involvement of NE folks in army, and their recognition as sporting athletes has given them new found respect. We mainlanders have failed to offer them respect and have been racist towards them. This needs to change.
4> There is a lot of material on YouTube that keeps talking about outrageous claims and fallacies in the Bible. The tech savvy young generation, which is bombarded by this material on a daily basis, will not stick to the faith for long. Perhaps 2 more generations.

I have hope for NE, and for good reason. NE needs a lot of love and attention. It will turn the corner. They don't hate us as much as we think they do. The average NE person does not have hate flowing in his veins unlike Kashmir.
Le Raciss is not a one way street.
They can freely move around the country, but access is restricted to "Indians" in many NE states, only AP is understandable though because many unique tribes + border with China and all.
Rest all states( excluding Assam, I think ) would probably lead to tribal chimpouts if "Indians" are allowed to settle there, own properties etc.
If this is not racism, what is?

Also these nutcases oppose infrastructure development because "Indians" will flood "their land" through the trains and 6 lane highways/roads what have you :|

They aren't, they don't even consider themselves Indian lmao, and worship the West( like all young f*gs world wide ) and find Japanese and Korean culture more admirable because influx of korean dub tv shows and movies and all.

God bless those who shill for India though, good she is in Delhi and not in Kohima or wherever, her family would disown her for being pro-India, or she would have got shot.


Is this all true or are you just making shit up ??

Amazing how you seem to know everything.


I was under impression that there is an insurgency as there is zero infrastructure there.

Read in an article that even famous Chushul village near Chushul airfield , the one Bhumihar gave to PLA only had 1 telephone for entire village till 2015 , and they had to share it the ITBP camp.

Same situation in NE i believe.
:yawn: May have exaggerated the "she may have got shot" bit, rest all is true, the West worship and Japanese Korea culture influx is also legit, I wrote that to again specify that they don't even find "Indian" culture or tv shows etc admirable, meanwhile they worship the West( years of influence by Anglosphere Missionaries ) and look up to Korea, again, because we have no similarities to these tribals in both religion( mostly ) or tribe.

:dude:There are insurgencies there because of some ~60 years of active fanning of tribal fears of "they will take over my land", "they will rape my women", "they will make me minority in my own land" and after conversion "they worship pagan gods!" by US/UK Missionaries, it was started with the British conquest of these parts, since the 30's active religious conversion was promoted, by the 50's everything went in full throttle, conversions backed with fear mongering about the brown skinned, round eyed Indian boogeyman who worships elephant headed gods etc.
US/UK were promoting this all at that time to "contain" India with insurgencies since it was seen as a USSR ally, and a "socialist" country in the Cold War alignments.


It is because of the insurgency and oogah boogah mindset is why Infrastructure development has been stalled in states like Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland.


:lehappy: Time for anecdotes! some 9 years back I was on this technology forum and there was this one Mizo dude called "michael" from his username whining about how his entire state doesn't have a railway network( don't know if this is true ) at all and proper roads, when central govt talks about extending railway network to Mizroram, particularly to the State capital there, Aizawl, all the village elders + political parties start protesting against it, because "Indians will flood our land".
Now this fellow was an atheist metal head, so he was practically edgy contrarian against his own tribe, so the guy was ok otherwise, not like the typical NE tribal you may encounter anywhere else

Apparently Till today there isn't a railway line going to the state capital Aizawl, it is being built since 2015 and will be completed by 2023 according to wiki.
 

samsaptaka

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US deep state funding insurgency in NE ?

Are you on drugs ? :scared2::scared2::scared2::scared2:
Missionaries and xtian mafia is a dog kept on a leash by the CIA and US deep state to be used to destabilize other nations 'just enough' so that they don't become strong nations, and also do not suspect the US hand in the said destabilization.
And yes , you should read 'Breaking India' by Rajiv Malhotra, excellently researched and written.
Once you read, you will feel, it is YOU who were on drugs all along for not knowing the truth !
 

Rassil Krishnan

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We mainlanders have failed to offer them respect and have been racist towards them. This needs to change.
Only systemic bias has to be dealt with and in systemic terms there is arguably some bias in favour of them as we cant readily own land in their states.

Personal cases of insults should be taken in and thrown back not complained about.if things get out of hand they must report to the police.a company or government,state,etc are systems and they rejecting you is a more important issue than the opinions of random private people(as if every one is super cool with everyone in this country).

This outlook of every person should be super nice to me in private is the stupid western attitude.only the countries ecoSYSTEM and organisations should be nice to you, individuals should be able to not like you as long as they are not anti-national.just be an adult and remember words do not hurt you.
 

garg_bharat

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China invaded Bhutanese territory at Doklam and eventually built military infrastructure there, and nobody went to war. So I doubt Chinese building another village on Bhutanese territory near Doklam will wake India up. Of course this village will first become part of dual use infrastructure before becoming a full PLA military base, but Indian government bureaucrats have become experts at ignoring threats by now.
Boss winning the economic war is more important than a village in Doklam.

India is accumulating fx at a fast pace due to the reduction in junk it was buying from China. Indians were buying a lot of low-quality products which could be produced locally but we were obliged under WTO and such shit.

Despite the infra, China is building, a quick victory in battle won't come easy for China. Such infra has limited utility in war.
 

mokoman

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This is the truth,they are here to keep us occupied.

“Looking at these satellite photographs in the media of the Chinese building ammunition dumps or habitation on their side of the LAC,” notes a senior Government official, “you might get the impression this is a one-sided campaign. ”

Used to think same thing. crazy how much they are building .

More troubling than any fictional .5 front is the infra work in Tibet.
 

Deadtrap

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This is the truth,they are here to keep us occupied.

“Looking at these satellite photographs in the media of the Chinese building ammunition dumps or habitation on their side of the LAC,” notes a senior Government official, “you might get the impression this is a one-sided campaign. ”

Used to think same thing. crazy how much they are building .

More troubling than any fictional .5 front is the infra work in Tibet.
While things mentioned here are true, it still gives me 10 feet Chinese vibes. Army will look into every development of the Chinese and will bring in appropriate countermeasures. We have been doing since ages at the LoC, same suit will be followed here.
 

FalconSlayers

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We’re buying Super Herons from Israel but I feel we should buy the Armed version of it. Will benefit us only. The only true UCAV that India has is the IAI Eitan, and the existing Herons are upgraded to carry munitions but its capacity is far less. We literally have no plan for dedicated UCAVs, thats why Turkish Bayraktar is selling like hot cakes. It is small, inexpensive, yet effective af.
 

Blue Water Navy

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FalconSlayers

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We’re buying Super Herons from Israel but I feel we should buy the Armed version of it. Will benefit us only. The only true UCAV that India has is the IAI Eitan, and the existing Herons are upgraded to carry munitions but its capacity is far less. We literally have no plan for dedicated UCAVs, thats why Turkish Bayraktar is selling like hot cakes. It is small, inexpensive, yet effective af.
 

Hari Sud

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We’re buying Super Herons from Israel but I feel we should buy the Armed version of it. Will benefit us only. The only true UCAV that India has is the IAI Eitan, and the existing Herons are upgraded to carry munitions but its capacity is far less. We literally have no plan for dedicated UCAVs, thats why Turkish Bayraktar is selling like hot cakes. It is small, inexpensive, yet effective af.
How about India acquiring or building tiny UCAVs with ammunition to carry. Turkish have a lead in that. The tiny ones have a battle field advantages as proven in Syria and Armenia.
 

ezsasa

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How about India acquiring or building tiny UCAVs with ammunition to carry. Turkish have a lead in that. The tiny ones have a battle field advantages as proven in Syria and Armenia.
we already have a tiny UCAV, Rustom 1. No need to import. Few modifications and it is good to go.

This UAV scenario in battlefield conditions is a new development, it takes a few months of internal deliberations by security establishment to come out with a policy.

This time adoption of policy into a product won’t be difficult, almost all components can be made within the country, and private players are already in place. It won’t be like Rustom 1 or 2.

but domestic drone component makers should not be sitting idle either, these days all it takes to conduct a webinar is to have zoom call and put it on YouTube. They should do their bit, if they want business. Our domestic drone entrepreneurs are a weird bunch, they have a golden opportunity after Armenia Azerbaijan war, yet didn’t do one bit to promote their own products & technologies. Maybe they feel public opinion is irrelevant for their business.
 
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johnq

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Boss winning the economic war is more important than a village in Doklam.

India is accumulating fx at a fast pace due to the reduction in junk it was buying from China. Indians were buying a lot of low-quality products which could be produced locally but we were obliged under WTO and such shit.

Despite the infra, China is building, a quick victory in battle won't come easy for China. Such infra has limited utility in war.
I don't think it's a good idea to lose Doklam and surrounding Bhutanese territory to China. If India looks the other way on Chinese landgrabbing of Bhutanese territory in Doklam now, it will mean losing an extremely important strategic area to China, which will eventually come back to haunt India during any active war. In spite of public statements to the contrary, Bhutan is helpless here without Indian help. If India does not actively step up now to stop China, not only will it lose a strategic piece of land to China, but also Bhutan's trust in the long term. Since China is already occupying this land, India doesn't need Bhutan's permission to encircle Chinese positions here, either.

For too long economic and political reasons have been used to justify strategic territorial losses to China. I believe India can tackle both the economy and China at the same time.

India should encircle the areas illegally occupied by China in Doklam, including the village and the road. It should also stop any further road construction and stop Chinese troops from entering the area, similar to what the PLA is doing to Indian Army patrols in Depsang.

Here is an article with the relevent positions shown on satellite images:


Satellite images appear to show China developing area along disputed border with India and Bhutan
By James Griffiths and Manveena Suri, CNN

Updated 9:49 PM ET, Tue November 24, 2020
An annotated satellite image of the China-Bhutan border in the disputed region of Doklam which appears to show a newly constructed village and supply depot.


An annotated satellite image of the China-Bhutan border in the disputed region of Doklam which appears to show a newly constructed village and supply depot.
Hong Kong (CNN)New satellite images appear to show China has built up an area in the Himalayas along a disputed border with India and Bhutan that was the site of a months-long standoff in 2017.
According to US-based satellite operator Maxar Technologies, the images, dated October 28, 2020, show "there has clearly been significant construction activity this year all along the Torsa River valley area." In a statement, Maxar added there had also been construction of "new military storage bunkers" near the Doklam area.
Maxar said the images show the newly constructed Pangda Village, on the Bhutanese side of the disputed border, as well as a supply depot in Chinese territory, near the point of a tense dispute between Indian and Chinese forces in 2017.
In a statement, Bhutan's ambassador to India, Major General Vetsop Namgyel, said "there is no Chinese village inside Bhutan."


China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said that "China's normal construction activities on its own territory are entirely within the scope of China's sovereignty, and there is nothing wrong with it." India's Ministry of External Affairs did not respond to a request for comment.
Indian broadcaster NDTV first reported the satellite images.
Satellite imagery of the Chinese village of Pangda, provided by Maxar Technologies. The firm claims the village was built on the Bhutanese side of a disputed border with China.


Satellite imagery of the Chinese village of Pangda, provided by Maxar Technologies. The firm claims the village was built on the Bhutanese side of a disputed border with China.
A thin strip of land bordering all three countries, the Doklam area is claimed by both China and Bhutan, but it is also strategically important to India, because of its proximity to the Siliguri Corridor, a vital artery between New Delhi and its north eastern states.
"The Siliguri Corridor is strategically important and highly sensitive territory, as it remains the only bridge between the eight north-eastern states of India and the rest of the country," analyst Syed Fazl-e-Haider wrote earlier this year in an article published by Australian think tank, The Lowy Institute . "By an advance of just 130 kilometers (80 miles), the Chinese military could cut off Bhutan, west Bengal and the north-eastern states of India. About 50 million people in north-east India would be separated from the country."
In an article in the state-run Global Times newspaper Monday, Chinese experts were quoted refuting Maxar's claims and reports in Indian media that a village had been built in Bhutanese territory.
Just where the two countries draw their borders is highly disputed, however. The 2017 stand-off was sparked after Bhutan accused China of constructing a road inside its territory in "direct violation" of treaty obligations. China, which does not have formal diplomatic relations with Bhutan, denied the accusation, contending that the area is part of Chinese territory.
Bhutan is traditionally a strong ally of India's, relying on Delhi to provide training for its armed forces and cooperating closely with India on foreign policy. That appears to be shifting, however, particularly as the rivalry between Beijing and Delhi heats up.
Earlier this year, India and China engaged in a bloody clash along another disputed border in the Himalayas which left at least 20 soldiers dead, the worst conflict between the two countries since they fought a war over the same territory in 1962.
While both countries agreed to deescalate, Maxar Technologies' satellite imagery has shown that China continues to reinforce its position along the border with India, though further construction is unlikely at this time of year due to the harsh winter conditions high in the Himalayas.
A wide view of the disputed Doklam area provided by Maxar Technologies.


A wide view of the disputed Doklam area provided by Maxar Technologies.
The continued gradual reinforcement of positions, and angrily rebuffed allegations of encroachment, has echoes of Beijing's behavior in the South China Sea, where it has built up and militarized islets, reefs and islands, giving it effective control of huge swaths of the disputed region, a hugely important fishing and shipping area over which sovereignty is claimed in part or whole by six other governments.
"They're asserting their claim so they're creating the facts on the ground so there's the village, which is part of a larger policy," said Manoj Joshi, a distinguished fellow at the Observer Research Foundation, a New Delhi-based think tank. "After (2017), they realized, just like the Indian side, their border areas are very thinly populated so it becomes very difficult to patrol the area. Now, by creating these facts on the ground, by creating this village, you can say it was always there. In the style of the Chinese, you create the facts on ground and then you say it's always been the case."
"I think (Bhutan has) figured that we'll live with it and not make a noise and just look the other way," Joshi said, adding that without its neighbor complaining, there is little Delhi can do.
"As the crow flies, this point is over 11 kilometers from the Indian position so there's nothing India can do unless Bhutan makes a public call for help. If you look at the Indo-Bhutanese Treaty, there's no explicit defense clause. So, essentially the Bhutanese live with it, we look the other way and the Chinese create the facts on the ground."
In particular, the rather tenuous nature of Pangda Village is reminiscent of the initial bases built on sandbars and tiny islets in the disputed waters. The high Himalayas are a hostile environment at the best of times, but as Nathan Ruser, an analyst at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, the new village appears built more for territorial bragging rights than longevity.
"The high resolution imagery also shows how precarious of a village it is, being constructed on what is essentially a sandbank in the middle of a mountain river valley (where snowmelt and high cliffs make water flow unpredictable and flash floods common)," Ruser wrote on Twitter in response to the new imagery. "To combat this Chinese engineers have constructed a small retaining wall, I assume designed to keep any flood water out of the village. I'm not sure I'd trust it when the only way in and out is a road that would get flooded before the village."
 
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