Incredible Indian Wild Life

BangaliBabu

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A terrible tragedy happened yesterday!! Well, it was a bulbul (red-vented) fledgling we took in our home (big one btw) 3 days ago because it could not take flight easily. The bulbuls laid 3 eggs, one survived hale and heartily. It was the second one we rescued (or hoped to).

All those hopes of rescuing it and releasing into the wild went to trash yesterday midday. Rescued as it fell out from our courtyard tree, it was fed on chhatu and some rice occasionally. On top of that, given the big wooden casements we have in our home, the parents already detected it and brought insects and some fruit-with-skins as food.

All that changed since early morning yesterday. It suddenly became very still and was constantly pooping at the same place. We tried to feed it but to no avail. Left to the parents, they constantly prodded/pinched it to make it fly. Still no response. I don't know but I think I should've left it by that tree as it was 2 days early since it was found my me as not having gained weight nor any strength in it's legs. Near noon, it tried to flap it's wings for the last time. It was in severe pain :"( and panting for breath. Within a minute, it's head drooped while my mom was holding it in her hands. And there it was, no more. Finally, we made sure it was really no more and had to dispose off that body in our wasted backyard.

Nature is indeed brutal and I cannot stop thinking of the guilt I had made to bring it inside. All the more it increased it's misery, I think. I just cannot imagine what would be the feeling being in that cute fledgling's place. Such a decent and harmless species the bulbul is, the death of it's offspring just made it harder for me from now onwards to assuage the "maya" it left on me. I really cried today after so many years. It might'vr been a terrible life for that fledgling inside even for 2 days only even if I might think I had tried my best to save it from being a painful victim of a cat or civet or mongoose outside.
 

indiatester

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A terrible tragedy happened yesterday!! Well, it was a bulbul (red-vented) fledgling we took in our home (big one btw) 3 days ago because it could not take flight easily. The bulbuls laid 3 eggs, one survived hale and heartily. It was the second one we rescued (or hoped to).

All those hopes of rescuing it and releasing into the wild went to trash yesterday midday. Rescued as it fell out from our courtyard tree, it was fed on chhatu and some rice occasionally. On top of that, given the big wooden casements we have in our home, the parents already detected it and brought insects and some fruit-with-skins as food.

All that changed since early morning yesterday. It suddenly became very still and was constantly pooping at the same place. We tried to feed it but to no avail. Left to the parents, they constantly prodded/pinched it to make it fly. Still no response. I don't know but I think I should've left it by that tree as it was 2 days early since it was found my me as not having gained weight nor any strength in it's legs. Near noon, it tried to flap it's wings for the last time. It was in severe pain :"( and panting for breath. Within a minute, it's head drooped while my mom was holding it in her hands. And there it was, no more. Finally, we made sure it was really no more and had to dispose off that body in our wasted backyard.

Nature is indeed brutal and I cannot stop thinking of the guilt I had made to bring it inside. All the more it increased it's misery, I think. I just cannot imagine what would be the feeling being in that cute fledgling's place. Such a decent and harmless species the bulbul is, the death of it's offspring just made it harder for me from now onwards to assuage the "maya" it left on me. I really cried today after so many years. It might'vr been a terrible life for that fledgling inside even for 2 days only even if I might think I had tried my best to save it from being a painful victim of a cat or civet or mongoose outside.
I have rescued so many birds and animals that I take these deaths as part of regular things. The worst is when munias die in due to being disoriented in all glass companies. This usually happens when they are taking care of hatched young ones. That munia dying means the entire family starves. Churns your stomach actually.
munia-2.jpeg


To make you look at better things, these are the ones that have recovered and were released.
prinia.jpeg


Prinia. Recovered and released back in same area.

parrot.jpeg


Parrot. Recovered.

pond-heron.jpeg


Pond Heron. (rescued many of them). All released after being treated

flower-pecker.jpeg


Flower pecker. Was able to rescue and release.
 

Srinivas_K

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I have rescued so many birds and animals that I take these deaths as part of regular things. The worst is when munias die in due to being disoriented in all glass companies. This usually happens when they are taking care of hatched young ones. That munia dying means the entire family starves. Churns your stomach actually.
View attachment 53069

To make you look at better things, these are the ones that have recovered and were released.
View attachment 53070

Prinia. Recovered and released back in same area.

View attachment 53071

Parrot. Recovered.

View attachment 53072

Pond Heron. (rescued many of them). All released after being treated

View attachment 53073

Flower pecker. Was able to rescue and release.
The campus reminds me of my memories when I worked there!
 

BangaliBabu

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I have rescued so many birds and animals that I take these deaths as part of regular things. The worst is when munias die in due to being disoriented in all glass companies. This usually happens when they are taking care of hatched young ones. That munia dying means the entire family starves. Churns your stomach actually.
View attachment 53069

To make you look at better things, these are the ones that have recovered and were released.
View attachment 53070

Prinia. Recovered and released back in same area.

View attachment 53071

Parrot. Recovered.

View attachment 53072

Pond Heron. (rescued many of them). All released after being treated

View attachment 53073

Flower pecker. Was able to rescue and release.
Thank you for such amazing pictures. I'm a novice in this field and no doubt have some blame to take personally.

I still feel the chhatu and besan feed was wrong. It should've been better if I'd gave it cerelac and some fruit chunks. Insects I won't be able to find any properly, so I'll not say anything about it.

Had it been handed over to an agency, it might've been saved but it was too late for that since I took it to my ego to feed it and release it into the wild afterwards.

It looks like you know avian conservation either as a hobby or as a job. Please enlighten this forum on suitable bird feed for common household aves and some common cures which can be brought from local medicos as injections or oral administrations for preventive methods. It'll be good for a common person like me.
 

indiatester

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Thank you for such amazing pictures. I'm a novice in this field and no doubt have some blame to take personally.

I still feel the chhatu and besan feed was wrong. It should've been better if I'd gave it cerelac and some fruit chunks. Insects I won't be able to find any properly, so I'll not say anything about it.

Had it been handed over to an agency, it might've been saved but it was too late for that since I took it to my ego to feed it and release it into the wild afterwards.

It looks like you know avian conservation either as a hobby or as a job. Please enlighten this forum on suitable bird feed for common household aves and some common cures which can be brought from local medicos as injections or oral administrations for preventive methods. It'll be good for a common person like me.
I don't attempt to take care of them myself or by our staff. I only call ARRC or PfA for rescue and get our guards to safe keep the birds till they arrive. Usually within a day. If need be, I used to book an uber/ola cab and send these birds in card board boxes. The few hundreds was always worth the clear conscience.

For flower-pecker, I use diluted honey and other usually only water. Mostly they are dehydrated and revive after having some water and rest.
We have venomous snakes (usually Russel vipers) in our complex too. Earlier they used to be killed, but we got the guards educated and a snake catching stick.
Now they just catch them and dispose them at a nearby creek.
 

IndianHawk

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I have rescued so many birds and animals that I take these deaths as part of regular things. The worst is when munias die in due to being disoriented in all glass companies. This usually happens when they are taking care of hatched young ones. That munia dying means the entire family starves. Churns your stomach actually.
View attachment 53069

To make you look at better things, these are the ones that have recovered and were released.
View attachment 53070

Prinia. Recovered and released back in same area.

View attachment 53071

Parrot. Recovered.

View attachment 53072

Pond Heron. (rescued many of them). All released after being treated

View attachment 53073

Flower pecker. Was able to rescue and release.
Great job man. I had many parrots . Loved them to bits. They are so bloody intelligent and loving.
 

Assassin 2.0

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A terrible tragedy happened yesterday!! Well, it was a bulbul (red-vented) fledgling we took in our home (big one btw) 3 days ago because it could not take flight easily. The bulbuls laid 3 eggs, one survived hale and heartily. It was the second one we rescued (or hoped to).

All those hopes of rescuing it and releasing into the wild went to trash yesterday midday. Rescued as it fell out from our courtyard tree, it was fed on chhatu and some rice occasionally. On top of that, given the big wooden casements we have in our home, the parents already detected it and brought insects and some fruit-with-skins as food.

All that changed since early morning yesterday. It suddenly became very still and was constantly pooping at the same place. We tried to feed it but to no avail. Left to the parents, they constantly prodded/pinched it to make it fly. Still no response. I don't know but I think I should've left it by that tree as it was 2 days early since it was found my me as not having gained weight nor any strength in it's legs. Near noon, it tried to flap it's wings for the last time. It was in severe pain :"( and panting for breath. Within a minute, it's head drooped while my mom was holding it in her hands. And there it was, no more. Finally, we made sure it was really no more and had to dispose off that body in our wasted backyard.

Nature is indeed brutal and I cannot stop thinking of the guilt I had made to bring it inside. All the more it increased it's misery, I think. I just cannot imagine what would be the feeling being in that cute fledgling's place. Such a decent and harmless species the bulbul is, the death of it's offspring just made it harder for me from now onwards to assuage the "maya" it left on me. I really cried today after so many years. It might'vr been a terrible life for that fledgling inside even for 2 days only even if I might think I had tried my best to save it from being a painful victim of a cat or civet or mongoose outside.
You made your efforts thats the thing which matters the most.
Karama krte jao fall ki chinta na karo.
( Do your karma without thinking about results)
 

Assassin 2.0

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India, under the leadership of PM @narendramodi, fulfilled its resolve to double the number of tigers 4 years ahead of the target through "Sankalp se Siddhi". The biggest camera trap of All India Tiger Estimation now joins #GuinnessWorldRecord.



India’s 2018 Tiger Census makes it to Guinness Book of World Records
The fourth cycle of the All India Tiger Estimation 2018 estimated 2,967 tigers or 75 per cent of the global tiger population in the nation. Its results were declared to the nation on Global Tiger Day last year by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
By: PTI | New Delhi |
Updated: July 11, 2020 8:35:56 pm
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Union Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar also said that under the leadership of the Prime Minister, India fulfilled its resolve to double tigers numbers four years before the target. (File photo)
India’s 2018 Tiger Census has made it to the Guinness Book of World Records for being the world’s largest camera trapping wildlife survey.

The fourth cycle of the All India Tiger Estimation 2018 estimated 2,967 tigers or 75 per cent of the global tiger population in the nation. Its results were declared to the nation on Global Tiger Day last year by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

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Terming this achievement a great moment, Union Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar tweeted, “The All India Tiger Estimation is now in the Guinness World Records for being the largest camera trap wildlife survey, a great moment indeed and a shining example of Aatmanirbhar Bharat.”


He also said that under the leadership of the Prime Minister, India fulfilled its resolve to double tigers numbers four years before the target through “Sankalp se Sidhi”.

Explained | Why the tiger population in India is increasing

The Guinness World Records website said, “The fourth iteration of the survey conducted in 2018-19 – was the most comprehensive to date, in terms of both resource and data amassed. Camera traps (outdoor photographic devices fitted with motion sensors that start recording when an animal passes by) were placed in 26,838 locations across 141 different sites and surveyed an effective area of 121,337 square kilometres (46,848 square miles).

“In total, the camera traps captured 34,858,623 photographs of wildlife (76,651 of which were tigers and 51,777 were leopards; the remainder were other native fauna). From these photographs, 2,461 individual tigers (excluding cubs) were identified using stripe-pattern-recognition software
 

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