Idiotic Sinking state of Bangladesh

gslv markIII

Regular Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
972
Likes
7,103
Country flag
Locals watch as the building of the Char Silimpur Government Primary School is slowly devoured by the Padma in Mizanpur union of Rajbari Sadar upazila yesterday. The school, located in Char Silimpur village, was lost to river erosion between 1:00pm and 5:00pm. Photo: Collected
Perfect location for a floating school as proposed by Bilal of PDF, lol. :rofl: @FalconSlayers
 

Maharaj samudragupt

Kritant Parashu
Banned
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
7,651
Likes
21,853
Country flag
View attachment 112327

Locals watch as the building of the Char Silimpur Government Primary School is slowly devoured by the Padma in Mizanpur union of Rajbari Sadar upazila yesterday. The school, located in Char Silimpur village, was lost to river erosion between 1:00pm and 5:00pm. Photo: Collected
This happens in Bihar and Assam also , saar.
I won't laugh about it.
 

gslv markIII

Regular Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
972
Likes
7,103
Country flag
You all might find this interesting.

This is a road being dug up in Dhaka. See the layers of bricks underneath the surface?

1632843282034.png


Since Raqibool land is a swampy delta, there are no rocks naturally available for construction. Bangladesh uses bricks as sub base for roads & crushed bricks as aggregate in asphalt/ concrete.

1632849889784.png


Raqibool technology...

1632849903640.png


Well, you can expect the quality of the roads & structures using crushed bricks. (bricks are of low strength than stone aggregate which will result in concrete with lower compressive strength )
 

Cheran

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2019
Messages
4,271
Likes
32,736
Country flag
You all might find this interesting.

This is a road being dug up in Dhaka. See the layers of bricks underneath the surface?

View attachment 112333

Since Raqibool land is a swampy delta, there are no rocks naturally available for construction. Bangladesh uses bricks as sub base for roads & crushed bricks as aggregate in asphalt/ concrete.

View attachment 112352

Raqibool technology...

View attachment 112353

Well, you can expect the quality of the roads & structures using crushed bricks. (bricks are of low strength than stone aggregate which will result in concrete with lower compressive strength )
haha indian use brick for house but we use brick for public road loool

Bangladesh 1
India 0
 

charlie

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2010
Messages
1,101
Likes
998
Country flag
You all might find this interesting.

This is a road being dug up in Dhaka. See the layers of bricks underneath the surface?

View attachment 112333

Since Raqibool land is a swampy delta, there are no rocks naturally available for construction. Bangladesh uses bricks as sub base for roads & crushed bricks as aggregate in asphalt/ concrete.

View attachment 112352

Raqibool technology...

View attachment 112353

Well, you can expect the quality of the roads & structures using crushed bricks. (bricks are of low strength than stone aggregate which will result in concrete with lower compressive strength )
Well I should not take pot shot at this but you have to think from their perspective

I think it’s strong enough for their requirements.
43546516-49D5-4C33-8C00-6ACCA47C4886.jpeg
 

gslv markIII

Regular Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
972
Likes
7,103
Country flag
Ya'all Nibbiars Raqibool Infrastructure...

Rain disrupts life in Khulna city

Two-thirds of city face waterlogging, residents point to improper drainage

1633025758804.png


After yesterday noon's rainfall, two-thirds of Khulna city had to deal with severe waterlogging. The rain inundated the city and made residents suffer immensely.

Amirul Azad, senior Met officer of Khulna Regional Met Office, told The Daily Star that Khulna recorded 40 millimetres of rainfall from 12pm to 3pm.


And we here make fun of Municipal Corporations & State Governments when cities are flooded after receiving 10 or 20 cm rainfall. :rofl: :rofl:

How incompetent are Raqibools, really?
 

gslv markIII

Regular Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
972
Likes
7,103
Country flag
Ya'all Nibbiars Raqibool Infrastructure...
Ya'all Nibbiars finally found a sensible & intelligent Raqibool. :shock: :shock:

Development for whose benefit?

Eresh Omar Jamal
Thu Sep 30, 2021 12:00 AM

When we ask the question, "Who should development benefit?", the answer should be quite straightforward: "the people." But in reality, that is not often the case. This is not only true for Bangladesh, but for all countries as well. What is unique about Bangladesh, however, is the difficulty in holding government officials accountable for their ill-conceived or ill-intentioned development schemes that are oftentimes designed only for the benefit of the influential or vested quarters.

>>The swamp is just a one-party state masquerading as a democracy.

A key reason for this is the pathetic state of our electoral system. In a democracy, the best way to hold public representatives accountable is to vote them out for their incompetence or for failing to properly serve the public. However, when you have politicians getting elected into office unopposed—which is basically equivalent to them being selected into office—they cannot really be called public representatives, because the public didn't vote them in. This was quite evident in the most recent local body polls, where a substantial number of ruling party candidates won uncontested, and the voter turnout was embarrassingly low, probably because people in large numbers realised that the election was already a foregone conclusion.

>>Raqibools are paying construction costs comparable to the developed world for LDC quality construction. :pound:

In 2017, a World Bank report revealed that Bangladesh spends a much higher amount than India and China on road construction because of time overruns and lack of competitive bidding. A four-lane highway costs USD 1.1-1.3 million in India, and USD 1.3-1.6 million in China. In comparison, in Bangladesh, the estimated construction cost of a kilometre of the Rangpur-Hatikumrul four-lane highway was USD 6.6 million, USD 7 million for the Dhaka-Sylhet four-lane highway, USD 11.9 million for the Dhaka-Mawa four-lane highway, and USD 2.5 million for each of the Dhaka-Chattogram and Dhaka-Mymensingh four-lane highways. Despite Bangladesh having the highest road construction cost in the world, the report said that quality roads were hardly built in the country due to a lack of proper monitoring by the relevant authorities, and because construction firms were rarely held accountable for time and cost overruns.

>>
The excuse for that...:rofl:

Meanwhile, in response to a question as to why road construction cost in Bangladesh was so much higher, Road Transport and Bridges Minister Obaidul Quader told parliament in 2019 that it was due to "difference in soil conditions." :)rofl:) It is, however, hard to believe that the soil condition between Bangladesh and its next-door neighbour India is so different that Bangladesh's road construction cost was 2-10 times higher than India's.


>>Another case

In any case, what about other development projects? Surely, the higher costs for all projects can't be blamed on soil conditions? Let's take a look at the Payra Bridge project. According to a recent report published by this newspaper, the bridge is set to cost 3.5 times more than what the government originally estimated, and has taken five years longer than the original deadline. The project was supposed to be completed within December 2016 at a cost of Tk 413.28 crore. It is only now nearing its completion at a cost of around Tk 1,447.24 crore.


>> ~$650 million for solving the waterlogging problem in a city of 6 million people? That's more expensive than some metro rail projects in India. And they haven't solved the problem either. :rofl:

If we take another example, in 2017, the Chattogram Development Authority (CDA) undertook a project to solve Chattogram's perennial waterlogging problem. However, according to a report published in this newspaper on September 24, the Tk 5,617-crore mega scheme has been stumbling at every step of the way, due to "a hastily done feasibility study and poor action plan." The three-year project has been extended by three more years in two phases, while the estimated cost of the project has gone up by 8-39 times, according to project-related documents. Even more shockingly, the CDA, before unveiling the project, carried out a feasibility study in only about a week. According to town planners and engineers, a sound feasibility study for a project of this scale should have taken somewhere around a year at least.

How incompetent are Raqibools, really?
 

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top