How Pakistan’s Faulty Missiles Stopped a Nuclear War During Kargil

The Ultranationalist

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The issue of Indo-Pak is the world known affair but what made Pakistan not to go Nuclear on Kargil War. Though Pakistan planned to deploy nuclear weapons against India during the 1999 Kargil War.

According to the retired Pakistani nuclear scientist who allegedly claimed that Pak’s former leader Gen. Pervez Musharraf’s 1999 military adventurism in the Kargil region has failed because of the North Korea-aided, nuclear-capable Ghauri missiles he needed to deploy then had a defective guidance system.


Taepodong-class intermediate-range ballistic missile
However, the scientist has confirmed it through the statement, “during 1999 Kargil crisis the former army chief Musharraf, “wanted to deploy Ghauri missiles, but air went out of his balloon when the top general in charge of the missile program told him the missile had a faulty guidance system.”

Pakistan had carried out the successful first test of the intermediate-range ballistic missile which has developed by Khan Research Laboratory with North Korean assistance back on April 6, 1998.

Musharraf said that the ballistic missile failed to reach its predesignated impact point in Pakistan’s southwestern province of Baluchistan. To be volatile Line of Control in disputed Kashmir, after Musharraf became chief of the army staff began planning the ill-fated incursions to burst out the worst outbreak of fighting since the India-Pakistan war of 1971.



Musharraf was unaware of the Ghauri missile’s faulty guidance system and learned the truth in March 1999 before the Kargil war from Lt. Gen. Zulfikar Khan. And, suddenly after that, he ordered another Ghauri test. All this happened just three days after India tested its Agni-2 intermediate-range ballistic missile.

But, fortunately for India and unfortunately for Pakistan, this test also failed but was publicly declared a success, however. And, the scientist said North Koreans had confronted with the fault in their technology at army headquarters in Rawalpindi.

“The North Koreans started talking left and right but were told to open their eyes and take care of the guidance system in their Nodong missiles,” said the scientist.

Abdul Qadeer Khan, the exposed nuclear scientist from Pakistan whose laboratory develops nuclear warheads for the country’s missiles, admits there was a row about the Ghauri’s accuracy. But Khan exposes the statement that Musharraf wanted to return them over their faulty guidance system, saying, “What difference does it make if a nuclear-tipped missile falls 1 km left or right of the predetermined impact point?”


via
Meanwhile, the Kargil war followed in the wake of six nuclear tests carried out by Pak, which almost the triggered to ban against the country.

Interestingly, the Musharraf in his autobiography wrote, “I can also say with authority that in 1999 our nuclear capability was not yet operational. Merely exploding a bomb does not mean that you are operationally capable of deploying nuclear force in the field and delivering a bomb across the border over a selected target.” Musharraf also called it a “myth.”
http://defencelover.in/how-pakistans-faulty-missiles-stopped-a-nuclear-war-during-kargil/
 

AMCA

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Gentlemen, these are the missiles porkis take so much pride on, copies of scud, m9, m11 and no dong missiles and latest in their arsenal nasar a copy of chimese weichi 2 missile:lol:
This info was first revealed by Japan Times in the year 2013.

Here is the full report:




NEWS




Misguided: A North Korean military vehicle carries what is believed to be a Taepodong-class intermediate-range ballistic missile during a military parade in Pyongyang. | AFP-JIJI
ASIA PACIFIC
Faulty rockets played role in Kargil overreach: source
North’s missiles tied to Musharraf blunder
KYODO


ARTICLE HISTORY


ISLAMABAD – A retired Pakistani nuclear scientist has claimed that former Pakistani leader Gen. Pervez Musharraf’s 1999 military adventurism in the Kargil region of divided Kashmir failed in part because the North Korea-aided, nuclear-capable Ghauri missiles he wanted to deploy then had a faulty guidance system.

Speaking on condition of anonymity, the scientist said that during the Kargil crisis of May-July 1999, Musharraf, who was then army chief, “wanted to deploy Ghauri missiles, but air went out of his balloon when the top general in charge of the missile program told him the missile had a faulty guidance system.”





Over a year earlier, on April 6, 1998, Pakistan had carried out what it described as a successful first test of the intermediate-range ballistic missile, developed by Khan Research Laboratory with North Korean assistance.

Even Musharraf, who witnessed that Ghauri launch as a local corps commander, had been led to believe it was a success then, according to the nuclear scientist, who until recently had long been closely associated with the country’s nuclear and missile programs.

The truth, he said, is that the ballistic missile failed to reach its predesignated impact point in Pakistan’s southwestern province of Baluchistan and its debris could not be found — something that would have undermined the missile’s deterrent effect if it were made public.

Military experts and strategists have pondered why Musharraf, immediately after he became chief of the army staff in October 1998, began planning the ill-fated incursions across the volatile Line of Control in disputed Kashmir, sparking the worst outbreak of fighting since the India-Pakistan war of 1971 even though he knew Pakistan could not prevail in an all-out conventional war with its neighbor.

During the May-July 1999 conflict, the two sides fought a two-month limited war in Kargil that led to over 1,200 fatalities and added to fears of a nuclear showdown before then-U.S. President Bill Clinton helped broker a ceasefire and Pakistani withdrawal.

Musharraf’s gamble in Kargil has since been interpreted by many as an effort by Pakistan, aside from gaining a tactical advantage by occupying dominating positions in the Kargil Heights, to test the deterrence value of its nuclear weapons.

The untold story, according to the scientist, is that Musharraf was unaware of the Ghauri missile’s faulty guidance system even as he oversaw the covert occupation by Pakistan troops and mujahedeen “freedom fighters” of the inhospitable, snowbound outposts in Kargil that the Indian Army had vacated for the winter.

He said Musharraf only learned the truth in March 1999 from Lt. Gen. Zulfikar Khan, who then commanded the army’s Combat Division.

Musharraf then ordered another Ghauri test, which took place on April 14, 1999, just three days after India tested its Agni-2 intermediate-range ballistic missile and several weeks before India detected the extent of the Pakistani side’s penetration in Kargil.

But this test also failed, with the missile overflying its target and falling across the border in the Sistan region of southeastern Iran, the scientist said. It, too, was publicly declared a success, however.

The scientist’s remarks were corroborated by two other nuclear scientists and another knowledgeable source who confirmed that the two missiles tested in 1998 and 1999 both failed to impact at the predesignated points in Baluchistan.

While Pakistan claimed the Ghauri missiles were designed and produced indigenously, they were actually Nodong missiles supplied by North Korea and re-engineered in Pakistan to extend their strike range.



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The scientist claimed that after the second test, North Koreans were invited to a meeting at army headquarters in Rawalpindi, where they were confronted with the fault in their technology.

“The North Koreans started talking left and right but were told to open their eyes and take care of the guidance system in their Nodong missiles,” said the scientist, who was privy to the meeting.

Musharraf, he said, initially wanted to return the Nodong missiles to North Korea, from which it had imported 40 in knocked down condition in the mid-1990s. But then the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission undertook to replace the guidance with that of the country’s Chinese-aided Shaheen missile, he said.

Last Nov. 28, the improved version of Ghauri was test-fired and the government — true to form — declared it a success. Soon afterward, however, it was found to have exploded in midair and rained metal debris over parts of Sindh Province.

Pakistan’s disgraced nuclear scientist, Abdul Qadeer Khan, whose laboratory develops nuclear warheads for Pakistan’s missiles, concedes there was a row about the Ghauri’s accuracy.

But he ridicules the assertion that Musharraf wanted to return them over their faulty guidance system, saying, “What difference does it make if a nuclear-tipped missile falls 1 km left or right of the predetermined impact point?”

Khan claims Musharraf merely sought to return them because Pakistan had insufficient funds to pay back what it owed for them.

The Kargil crisis happened in the wake of six nuclear tests carried out by Pakistan in May 1998, which triggered sanctions against the country and led a drastic fall in foreign exchange reserves.

Pakistan suffered a serious military and diplomatic setback after successful Indian military action and intense international pressure forced it to unconditionally pull back behind the Line of Control as part of the U.S.-brokered ceasefire.

In his autobiography, published in 2006, Musharraf called it a “myth” that the two sides had come to the brink of nuclear war during the conflict and dismissed as “preposterous” speculation that Pakistan was preparing for a possible nuclear strike on India then.

“I can also say with authority that in 1999 our nuclear capability was not yet operational. Merely exploding a bomb does not mean that you are operationally capable of deploying nuclear force in the field and delivering a bomb across the border over a selected target,” he wrote.

Critics of Musharraf’s action often refer to the Kargil conflict as a “misadventure,” saying it was badly conceived and executed, while he wrongly assumed the world would sit back idly.

Instead of considering the Kargil as a blunder, Musharraf, who has been living in exile since quitting politics in 2008, claims it actually brought the Kashmir issue back into international focus and helped pave the way for a solution.

However, tension between the nuclear-armed neighbors, which have fought three wars since partition in 1947, two of them over Kashmir, has remained high since the Kargil conflict.
 

Hari Sud

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This missile failure at the time of Kargil war in 1999 was pretty well known and all the information about its failure is in public domain.

But to confuse the Indian and US intelligence and surveillance, Musharraf ordered to open the massive gates of Sargoda underground military complex to make it look like that missiles are ready and are being moved to position before being fired. This information was relayed to Bill Clinton, the US President and who sent his most trusted General Zinni to Islamabad to warn Musharraf.

Rest is history......
 
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Gentlemen, these are the missiles porkis take so much pride on, copies of scud, m9, m11 and no dong missiles and latest in their arsenal nasar a copy of chimese weichi 2 missile:lol:
I have been saying this for some time now Pakistani nuclear processing ability and delivery capability is primitive at best. Have not seen any reports or data that shows pakis even have more than a 5 kiloton capability at best?
 

Armand2REP

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I have been saying this for some time now Pakistani nuclear processing ability and delivery capability is primitive at best. Have not seen any reports or data that shows pakis even have more than a 5 kiloton capability at best?
I believe the general consensus is that of a Hiroshima sized yield has been proven in testing. While it is nowhere near as capable as India, all it takes is a Scud to threaten the capital. It was only ever meant as a weapon of terror for Pakistan.
 
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I believe the general consensus is that of a Hiroshima sized yield has been proven in testing. While it is nowhere near as capable as India, all it takes is a Scud to threaten the capital. It was only ever meant as a weapon of terror for Pakistan.
Not getting technical Hiroshima was 15 kilotons Pakistanis have demonstrated 9 kilotons

https://fas.org/nuke/guide/pakistan/nuke/



DEVICE DATE YIELD
[announced]
YIELD
[estimated]

[boosted device?] 28 May 1998 25-36 kiloton total 9-12 kiloton
Fission device 28 May 1998 12 kiloton
Low-yield device 28 May 1998 sub-kiloton --
Low-yield device 28 May 1998 sub-kiloton --
Low-yield device 28 May 1998 sub-kiloton --
Fission device 30 May 1998 12 kiloton 4-6 kiloton
Fission device not detonated 12 kiloton --
This table lists the nuclear tests that Pakistan claims to have carried out in May 1998 as well as the announced yields. Other sources have reported lower yields than those claimed by Pakistan. The Southern Arizona Seismic Observatory reports that the total seismic yield for the May 28th tests was 9-12 kilotons and that the yield for the May 30th tests was 4-6 kilotons.

Other than Scuds F-16 given by US are the only reliable delivery platform if they can penetrate Indian airspace
 

jat

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Why laughing at Pakistan, they successfully bluffed. Laugh at Indian government that was afraid of even the nonexistent Pakistani nuclear threat.
one nuke is enough to cause to a disaster. In your scenario is the city you are in gets nuked? Pakistan will loose sure but India didn't want anything from Pakistan. India still doesn't want anything from Pakistan.
 

The Ultranationalist

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I have been saying this for some time now Pakistani nuclear processing ability and delivery capability is primitive at best. Have not seen any reports or data that shows pakis even have more than a 5 kiloton capability at best?
While paki nuclear missiles are junk at best but there is a real possibility that they possess china made plutonium bombs. Making an atom bomb is not as big deal as making a missile once you get highly enriched uranium or plutonium. Pakis have already stolen the cyclotron tech and have also passed the same to the north koreans. So i am convinced that they have nukes at least while we have only exploded a 40 kt device so far and unless we explode a megaton bomb porkies will have upper hand over us in this area.
 

aarav

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While paki nuclear missiles are junk at best but there is a real possibility that they possess china made plutonium bombs. Making an atom bomb is not as big deal as making a missile once you get highly enriched uranium or plutonium. Pakis have already stolen the cyclotron tech and have also passed the same to the north koreans. So i am convinced that they have nukes at least while we have only exploded a 40 kt device so far and unless we explode a megaton bomb porkies will have upper hand over us in this area.
India with its Fast Breeder reactors can have a megaton bomb ,there is also reports of india posessing thermonuclear bombs but we can't test it because of NSG
 
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India with its Fast Breeder reactors can have a megaton bomb ,there is also reports of india posessing thermonuclear bombs but we can't test it because of NSG
I have seen quotes that say supercomputers have already tested do not need actual test?
India is worlds largest heavy water /tritium producer focus on hydrogen bombs

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The Ultranationalist

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India with its Fast Breeder reactors can have a megaton bomb ,there is also reports of india posessing thermonuclear bombs but we can't test it because of NSG
There is a difference between 'can have' and actually having. There are many countries with nuclear reactors but only few with bombs. What we can do is take america in confidence and convice her that our nukes are directed against commie gooks only and conduct the test. If america wont object then no one will and world wouldnt care about porkies, turkey chicken and china.
 

aarav

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There is a difference between 'can have' and actually having. There are many countries with nuclear reactors but only few with bombs. What we can do is take america in confidence and convice her that our nukes are directed against commie gooks only and conduct the test. If america wont object then no one will and world wouldnt care about porkies, turkey chicken and china.
I think testing in simulated environment in labs in virtual world through super computers can be done but enemy will still doubt our capabilities ,There is a reason India hasn't signed CTBT treaty nor others treaties which banned testing of nuclear weapons ,India could test the weapons but all will depend on external environment and top leadership.
 

The Ultranationalist

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I think testing in simulated environment in labs in virtual world through super computers can be done but enemy will still doubt our capabilities ,There is a reason India hasn't signed CTBT treaty nor others treaties which banned testing of nuclear weapons ,India could test the weapons but all will depend on external environment and top leadership.
Foe some reason i dont trust test simulation, exploding a real megaton bomb will make aitami kuwat wet her panties and send chills down the spine of their madarsa educated nooclear bum mobs.
 

no smoking

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There is a difference between 'can have' and actually having. There are many countries with nuclear reactors but only few with bombs. What we can do is take america in confidence and convice her that our nukes are directed against commie gooks only and conduct the test. If america wont object then no one will and world wouldnt care about porkies, turkey chicken and china.
How pathetic! You claim yourselves next superpower and you want everyone to treat you as a superpower, but you are begging a superpower to make it easier for you?

Unfortunately, the whole world cares about Pak as much as India. That is why their sanction was terminated when yours was off.
 

The Ultranationalist

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How pathetic! You claim yourselves next superpower and you want everyone to treat you as a superpower, but you are begging a superpower to make it easier for you?

Unfortunately, the whole world cares about Pak as much as India. That is why their sanction was terminated when yours was off.
Begging is porkistans forte which have to go around whoring and begging to survive, i just want my country to demonstrate what it is capable of.
 

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How about the 'Tactical nuclear missile' Nasr that the Pakis get orgasms over? It's complete and unadulterated bullshit when they claim that this is a potent deterrent against India's Cold Start.

The fact is they don't have the technological expertise to produce miniature nuke warheads. And they've never even tested one. Only a few selected countries posses the technical know-how - and Pak is not on the list. :tongue:

Untitled-1 copy.jpg
 
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no smoking

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The fact is they don't have the technological expertise to produce miniature nuke warheads. And they've never even tested one. Only a few selected countries posses the technical know-how - and Pak is not on the list. :tongue:

View attachment 23945
No, the minimized warheads are generally those with yields/weight rate around or even beyond 1k ton per kg while the size is still small enough to fit in a missile.

According to Wiki, Nasr missile can carry 400kg HE or a nuke with 5k ton detonation. It is not hard to build a 5k ton warhead around 400kg weight at all.
 

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No, the minimized warheads are generally those with yields/weight rate around or even beyond 1k ton per kg while the size is still small enough to fit in a missile.

According to Wiki, Nasr missile can carry 400kg HE or a nuke with 5k ton detonation. It is not hard to build a 5k ton warhead around 400kg weight at all.
Who feeds Wiki news? This particular one was from a Paki!

Through a weird quirk of physics, creating a small nuke is actually far much more difficult than creating a large nuke. With a large nuke, you could essentially just keep adding additional fusion stages until you have something like the Soviet Tsar Bomba, but a small nuke requires precise assembly and extremely difficult mathematics which the Pakis are not capable of!
 

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