HAL Light Combat Helicopter (LCH)

abingdonboy

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Bloody babus, wasting hard earned money of IAF. If it was private/foreign players they would have delivered all 15 LSP by now. That too before signing a deal.

These bloody suckers will never understand how hard it is being in Armed forces and scratch balls at LAC.
Sarcasm? It must be.....................
 

Cactus09

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HAL rolls out 300th ALH; ground run of LCH done too
 

Lancer

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HAL rolls out 300th ALH; ground run of LCH done too
I really hope they're working on getting that ATGM operational ASAP. We need LCH's in hundreds.

The Ka-226 deal should also be scrapped in favor of the LUH - all LUH class requirements (in the 3 services & Coast Guard) should be filled by the HAL chopper.
 

Cactus09

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I really hope they're working on getting that ATGM operational ASAP. We need LCH's in hundreds.

The Ka-226 deal should also be scrapped in favor of the LUH - all LUH class requirements (in the 3 services & Coast Guard) should be filled by the HAL chopper.
With the Ladakh crisis, I am pretty sure HAL and other DPSUs have got a good spurring by GoI. Really wished LCH to have quad racks for ATGMs like Viper or similar choppers of its class. Looks abit underarmed for its capabilities.
 

utubekhiladi

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I really hope they're working on getting that ATGM operational ASAP. We need LCH's in hundreds.

The Ka-226 deal should also be scrapped in favor of the LUH - all LUH class requirements (in the 3 services & Coast Guard) should be filled by the HAL chopper.
not only we need ATGM operational, but we also need a true multi-purpose missile like AGM-114

With the Ladakh crisis, I am pretty sure HAL and other DPSUs have got a good spurring by GoI. Really wished LCH to have quad racks for ATGMs like Viper or similar choppers of its class. Looks abit underarmed for its capabilities.
quad racks is not that difficult. I would have armed LCH with 30mm gun instead of 20mm.
 

Cactus09

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not only we need ATGM operational, but we also need a true multi-purpose missile like AGM-114



quad racks is not that difficult. I would have armed LCH with 30mm gun instead of 20mm.
Chances are that was deliberately kept at 20mm to help in weight reduction due to operational needs of high altitude. Have heard it leads to weight reduction of anywhere between 40-50kg.
 

johnq

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Light combat helicopters being built for Rs 125 crore each, says HAL
HAL's high-altitude attack helicopter is one-third the cost of the Apache

In a double assertion of its proficiency in building different kinds of helicopters, Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) on Monday achieved two significant landmarks: The company rolled out its 300th Dhruv advanced light helicopter (ALH) for the military; and also conducted the inaugural ground run of the first Light Combat Helicopter (LCH) it is series-producing for the Indian Air Force (IAF).
While the Dhruv, with over 280,000 flying hours logged, is already the backbone of the IAF and army’s light helicopter fleet, the LCH is a crucial new induction that would play an important role in any armed confrontation between Indian and Chinese troops on the Ladakh border, or in the looming militarization of the Line of Actual Control (LAC).
The LCH project was sanctioned after the 1999 Kargil War, when a dire need was felt for a weapons platform that could provide dedicated fire support to army soldiers at high altitudes, who can carry only a limited amount of weaponry. The Ministry of Defence accordingly sanctioned the LCH project in October 2006.
Fourteen years later, the LCH has become a reality. Business Standard learns that HAL has agreed to build the first 15 “limited series production” LCH for about Rs 125 crore per helicopter – about one-third the cost of each of the 28 AH-64E Apaches attack helicopters the government is importing from The Boeing Company.
True, the Apache is a bigger, more heavily armed gunship with more advanced avionics and battle-tested night fighting capabilities. But, for those reasons, it is expensive and the army and IAF will be making up the numbers with LCHs.
The military is still to sign a contract for 15 LCHs, but HAL has decided to start building the helicopters with its own funds. HAL’s board has sanctioned Rs 1,800 crore for this and production is well along.
A key attribute of the 5.8-tonne LCH is its ability to fly and fight at the altitudes the army is deployed at. In tests conducted in the Siachen Glacier sector, the LCH has demonstrated its capability to land and take off at altitudes of 5,000 metres with sufficient fuel and weaponry for combat missions against even higher targets.
Driving this performance is the LCH’s twin Shakti engines, especially designed by French firm, Safran, to deliver extra power at high altitudes.
That makes the LCH an ideal platform for providing infantry soldiers fire support in 15,000-16,000 feet-high contested areas such as Depsang, Galwan and the heights north and south of the Pangong Tso, where Indian soldiers are facing off against Chinese intruders.
The military has already projected to HAL an eventual requirement of 65 LCH for the IAF and 97 for the army.
For such a small, light helicopter, the LCH is a formidable fighting machine. Its two pilots, who are seated one behind the other in a slim tandem cockpit, can choose between a menu of weapons that they fire using a helmet pointing system that lets a pilot aim at a target just by looking at it.
The LCH’s weapons options include a nose-mounted, 20-millimetre turret gun; or 70-millimetre rockets; or air-to-air missiles that it carries on stub wings. The LCH is the first helicopter to fire air-to-air missiles against a flying target.
The LCH is also designed to carry anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs) that can knock out enemy tanks at ranges of up to seven kilometres.
Allowing it to survive on a battlefield where it will be a prized target, the LCH is protected by a range of devices. The pilots are shielded against ground fire by armoured panels around the cockpit and by a bulletproof windshield. The LCH has self-sealing fuel tanks that automatically seal up bullet holes with a rubber compound. It has damage-tolerant rotor blades and a main gearbox that can run for 30 minutes even after a bullet hit drains out all its oil.
The LCH is also fitted with an electronic warfare (EW) system that detects enemy missiles; and then scatters flares and chaff as decoys to lure the incoming missile away from the helicopter.
 

WolfPack86

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FIRST PHOTO: The first Light Combat Helicopter limited series production (LSP) airframe that had its inaugural ground-run yesterday. In the cockpit are Gp Capts Hari Nair & CG Narasimha Prasad.



FIRST ON LIVEFIST: The first Light Combat Helicopter limited series production (LCH-LSP) airframe on on its first ground run yesterday in Bengaluru.
 

WolfPack86

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Light Combat Helicopter being built for Rs 125 crore each, one-third the cost of the Apache

In a double assertion of its proficiency in building different kinds of helicopters, Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) on Monday achieved two significant landmarks: The company rolled out its 300th Dhruv advanced light helicopter (ALH) for the military; and also conducted the inaugural ground run of the first Light Combat Helicopter (LCH) it is series-producing for the Indian Air Force (IAF). While the Dhruv, with over 280,000 flying hours logged, is already the backbone of the IAF and army’s light helicopter fleet, the LCH is a crucial new induction that would play an important role in any armed confrontation between Indian and Chinese troops on the Ladakh border, or in the looming militarization of the Line of Actual Control (LAC). The LCH project was sanctioned after the 1999 Kargil War, when a dire need was felt for a weapons platform that could provide dedicated fire support to army soldiers at high altitudes, who can carry only a limited amount of weaponry. The Ministry of Defence accordingly sanctioned the LCH project in October 2006. Fourteen years later, the LCH has become a reality. Business Standard learns that HAL has agreed to build the first 15 “limited series production” LCH for about Rs 125 crore per helicopter – about one-third the cost of each of the 28 AH-64E Apaches attack helicopters the government is importing from The Boeing Company. True, the Apache is a bigger, more heavily armed gunship with more advanced avionics and battle-tested night fighting capabilities. But, for those reasons, it is expensive and the army and IAF will be making up the numbers with LCHs. The military is still to sign a contract for 15 LCHs, but HAL has decided to start building the helicopters with its own funds. HAL’s board has sanctioned Rs 1,800 crore for this and production is well along. A key attribute of the 5.8-tonne LCH is its ability to fly and fight at the altitudes the army is deployed at. In tests conducted in the Siachen Glacier sector, the LCH has demonstrated its capability to land and take off at altitudes of 5,000 metres with sufficient fuel and weaponry for combat missions against even higher targets. Driving this performance is the LCH’s twin Shakti engines, especially designed by French firm, Safran, to deliver extra power at high altitudes. That makes the LCH an ideal platform for providing infantry soldiers fire support in 15,000-16,000 feet-high contested areas such as Depsang, Galwan and the heights north and south of the Pangong Tso, where Indian soldiers are facing off against Chinese intruders. The military has already projected to HAL an eventual requirement of 65 LCH for the IAF and 97 for the army. For such a small, light helicopter, the LCH is a formidable fighting machine. Its two pilots, who are seated one behind the other in a slim tandem cockpit, can choose between a menu of weapons that they fire using a helmet pointing system that lets a pilot aim at a target just by looking at it. The LCH’s weapons options include a nose-mounted, 20-millimetre turret gun; or 70-millimetre rockets; or air-to-air missiles that it carries on stub wings. The LCH is the first helicopter to fire air-to-air missiles against a flying target. The LCH is also designed to carry anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs) that can knock out enemy tanks at ranges of up to seven kilometres. Allowing it to survive on a battlefield where it will be a prized target, the LCH is protected by a range of devices. The pilots are shielded against ground fire by armoured panels around the cockpit and by a bulletproof windshield. The LCH has self-sealing fuel tanks that automatically seal up bullet holes with a rubber compound. It has damage-tolerant rotor blades and a main gearbox that can run for 30 minutes even after a bullet hit drains out all its oil. The LCH is also fitted with an electronic warfare (EW) system that detects enemy missiles; and then scatters flares and chaff as decoys to lure the incoming missile away from the helicopter.
 

Bhadra

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SPECIFICATION
Type/Role : Light Combat Helicopter : Twin tandem seat, light attack helicopter

Roles :
* Air defense against UAVs
* Air defense against slow moving aircraft
* Escort to special heli-borne operations
* Destruction of Enemy Air Defence (DEAD)
* Offensive employment in urban warfare
* Counter surface force and COIN operations
* Support of Combat SAR operations
* Anti-tank and Anti-vehicle roles
* Scout duties

Performance
Max. AUW 5500 kg
Max. Cruise at SL 260 km/h
VNE 330 km/h
Max. Operating altitude 6500 m
Ferry range with interm.load 700 km

Dimensions
Max. height 5300 mm
Main rotor diameter 13300 mm
Max. Length 16000 mm
Wing Span 3550 mm
Tail rotor diameter 2054 mm

Armament
* 20 mm gun
* Air to surface missiles
* Air-to-Air missiles
* Unguided rockets
* Iron bombs,Cluster bomb units,Grenade launchers
* Anti-radiation missiles
Looks like it is only meant for IAF and Army aviation will have to import helicopters (LCH) for their requirements. As the listed job is not typical Army Aviation tasks.
 
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Bhadra

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They should sell al khalid to scrap to recover some money out of the investments they have done in Chines tin scrap.

LCH will rule over Al Khalid and other Pakistani armour.
Of course without an ATGM ?? What a joke...
 

Bleh

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Light Combat Helicopter being built for Rs 125 crore each, one-third the cost of the Apache

In a double assertion of its proficiency in building different kinds of helicopters, Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) on Monday achieved two significant landmarks: The company rolled out its 300th Dhruv advanced light helicopter (ALH) for the military; and also conducted the inaugural ground run of the first Light Combat Helicopter (LCH) it is series-producing for the Indian Air Force (IAF). While the Dhruv, with over 280,000 flying hours logged, is already the backbone of the IAF and army’s light helicopter fleet, the LCH is a crucial new induction that would play an important role in any armed confrontation between Indian and Chinese troops on the Ladakh border, or in the looming militarization of the Line of Actual Control (LAC). The LCH project was sanctioned after the 1999 Kargil War, when a dire need was felt for a weapons platform that could provide dedicated fire support to army soldiers at high altitudes, who can carry only a limited amount of weaponry. The Ministry of Defence accordingly sanctioned the LCH project in October 2006. Fourteen years later, the LCH has become a reality. Business Standard learns that HAL has agreed to build the first 15 “limited series production” LCH for about Rs 125 crore per helicopter – about one-third the cost of each of the 28 AH-64E Apaches attack helicopters the government is importing from The Boeing Company. True, the Apache is a bigger, more heavily armed gunship with more advanced avionics and battle-tested night fighting capabilities. But, for those reasons, it is expensive and the army and IAF will be making up the numbers with LCHs. The military is still to sign a contract for 15 LCHs, but HAL has decided to start building the helicopters with its own funds. HAL’s board has sanctioned Rs 1,800 crore for this and production is well along. A key attribute of the 5.8-tonne LCH is its ability to fly and fight at the altitudes the army is deployed at. In tests conducted in the Siachen Glacier sector, the LCH has demonstrated its capability to land and take off at altitudes of 5,000 metres with sufficient fuel and weaponry for combat missions against even higher targets. Driving this performance is the LCH’s twin Shakti engines, especially designed by French firm, Safran, to deliver extra power at high altitudes. That makes the LCH an ideal platform for providing infantry soldiers fire support in 15,000-16,000 feet-high contested areas such as Depsang, Galwan and the heights north and south of the Pangong Tso, where Indian soldiers are facing off against Chinese intruders. The military has already projected to HAL an eventual requirement of 65 LCH for the IAF and 97 for the army. For such a small, light helicopter, the LCH is a formidable fighting machine. Its two pilots, who are seated one behind the other in a slim tandem cockpit, can choose between a menu of weapons that they fire using a helmet pointing system that lets a pilot aim at a target just by looking at it. The LCH’s weapons options include a nose-mounted, 20-millimetre turret gun; or 70-millimetre rockets; or air-to-air missiles that it carries on stub wings. The LCH is the first helicopter to fire air-to-air missiles against a flying target. The LCH is also designed to carry anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs) that can knock out enemy tanks at ranges of up to seven kilometres. Allowing it to survive on a battlefield where it will be a prized target, the LCH is protected by a range of devices. The pilots are shielded against ground fire by armoured panels around the cockpit and by a bulletproof windshield. The LCH has self-sealing fuel tanks that automatically seal up bullet holes with a rubber compound. It has damage-tolerant rotor blades and a main gearbox that can run for 30 minutes even after a bullet hit drains out all its oil. The LCH is also fitted with an electronic warfare (EW) system that detects enemy missiles; and then scatters flares and chaff as decoys to lure the incoming missile away from the helicopter.
Nice!.. DALALs are getting uneasy. 😎
 

vishnugupt

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Self proclaimed experts here whom we call sir-sir day and night are actually dalaals who cant spare a minute to appreciate our own achievement neither they take pride in our past achievements. These Dallas pretend to be expert in everything always give answers by comparing their master's achievements. Actually, they All are suffering from inferiority complex and need a urgent psychiatric counselling.
 

abingdonboy

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FIRST PHOTO: The first Light Combat Helicopter limited series production (LSP) airframe that had its inaugural ground-run yesterday. In the cockpit are Gp Capts Hari Nair & CG Narasimha Prasad.



FIRST ON LIVEFIST: The first Light Combat Helicopter limited series production (LCH-LSP) airframe on on its first ground run yesterday in Bengaluru.
Great day

but regarding the counter measure suite (CMS) interested to see if they deliver it clean like this as it’s still IOC configuration or if by the time it is painted and finished it will have its CMS fitted or does that have to wait to FOC?

CMS is customer nominated equipment which usually is fitted and certified post IOC (see LUH and rescue hoist/FLIR)

+ HAL’s RWRDC gave away that Rudra is onto phase 2 which includes installation of DIRCM. Rudra has acted as a test bed for the LCH’s systems so far and DIRCM was always planned for LCH

Of course without an ATGM ?? What a joke...
Not far off. The lack of it is not a reason to delay induction and production
 

Pandora

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FIRST PHOTO: The first Light Combat Helicopter limited series production (LSP) airframe that had its inaugural ground-run yesterday. In the cockpit are Gp Capts Hari Nair & CG Narasimha Prasad.



FIRST ON LIVEFIST: The first Light Combat Helicopter limited series production (LCH-LSP) airframe on on its first ground run yesterday in Bengaluru.
Heck of a heli. Must say even better than tiger and chinese junk heli.
 

Bhumihar

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Ayy after this is done we should move on to HCH(Heavy combat Heli).
Maybe a mid life upgrade for LCH , remember its still flying on an underpowered engine.
 

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