Europeans and Racism

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List of current Territories, Colonies, and Dependencies

There are 61 colonies or territories in the world. Eight countries maintain them: Australia (6), Denmark (2), Netherlands (2), France (16), New Zealand (3), Norway (3), the United Kingdom (15), and the United States (14).

Source: The World Factbook, 2005
The following is a list of dependencies—territories under the jurisdiction of another country.

Under Australian Jurisdiction (6)
  • Ashmore and Cartier Islands
  • Christmas Island
  • Cocos (Keeling) Islands
  • Coral Sea Islands
  • Heard Island and McDonald Islands
  • Norfolk Island
Under Danish Jurisdiction (2)
Under Dutch Jurisdiction (2)
Under French Jurisdiction (16)
Under New Zealand Jurisdiction (3)
  • Cook Islands
  • Niue
  • Tokelau
Under Norwegian Jurisdiction (3)
  • Bouvet Island
  • Jan Mayen
  • Svalbard
Under UK Jurisdiction (15)
Under U.S. Jurisdiction (14)

 

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List of current Territories, Colonies, and Dependencies

There are 61 colonies or territories in the world. Eight countries maintain them: Australia (6), Denmark (2), Netherlands (2), France (16), New Zealand (3), Norway (3), the United Kingdom (15), and the United States (14).

Source: The World Factbook, 2005
The following is a list of dependencies—territories under the jurisdiction of another country.

Under Australian Jurisdiction (6)
  • Ashmore and Cartier Islands
  • Christmas Island
  • Cocos (Keeling) Islands
  • Coral Sea Islands
  • Heard Island and McDonald Islands
  • Norfolk Island
Under Danish Jurisdiction (2)
Under Dutch Jurisdiction (2)
Under French Jurisdiction (16)
Under New Zealand Jurisdiction (3)
  • Cook Islands
  • Niue
  • Tokelau
Under Norwegian Jurisdiction (3)
  • Bouvet Island
  • Jan Mayen
  • Svalbard
Under UK Jurisdiction (15)
Under U.S. Jurisdiction (14)

Typical white colonialism...
 

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Rising Hate Crimes Against Asian Americans, 867% increase in racist crimes against asians in 2020

 
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Aftermath of a Deadly Racist Attack
On Feb. 19, 2020, a right-wing extremist murdered nine young people in Hanau, Germany. Because the gunman shot himself, there will be no trial. But those left behind have questions for the country they call home.


1-maxi_nesar.jpg

† Nesar Hashemi, 21
Brother Etris, 24
Mother Najiba, 45
Sister Saida, 25
Father Mir Salam, 57


8-maxi_Kaloyan.jpg

† Kaloyan Velkov, 33
Cousin Vaska Zlateva, 35

9-maxi_vili.jpg

† Vili-Viorel Păun, 22
Father Niculescu, 45
Mother Iulia, 42


7-maxi_hamza.jpg

† Hamza Kurtović, 22
Sister Ajla, 25
Father Armin, 46
Mother Dijana, 47



3.mini_Mercedes_poster.jpg

† Mercedes Kierpacz, 35
Son Colorado, 17
Mother Sophia, 60
Father Filip Goman, 57



5-Maxi_Ferhat.jpg

† Ferhat Unvar, 24
Brother Mirza, 8



2.mini_sedat_poster.jpg

† Sedat Gürbüz, 29
Father Salahettin, 56
Mother Emiş, 51



6-maxi_goekhan.jpg

† Gökhan Gültekin, 37
Nephew Mert, 26
Mother Hüsna, 67
Brother Çetin, 46


4.mini_saracoglu_poster.jpg

† Fatih Saraçoǧlu, 34
Girlfriend Diana Sokoli, 33


 

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BERLIN

Racism has become part of everyday life in Germany, and combating it needs more active engagement from all members of the society, the country’s foreign minister said on Friday.

Heiko Maas paid tribute to the victims of far-right terror attack in the western town of Hanau last year in a statement he posted on Twitter, and called for stronger efforts to address the racism problem in Germany.

“Fatih, Ferhat, Gokhan, Hamza, Kaloyan, Mercedes, Nesar, Sedat, and Vili. Nine names. Nine people. They were torn from life a year ago in Hanau. Because racism has become part of everyday life in our county. Because [racism] destroys lives. Because [racism] kills,” he said.

The victims with immigrant backgrounds were killed by a German far-right extremist who attacked two cafes in Hanau on Feb. 19, 2020.

Maas said this attack did not come as a surprise, as the country witnessed growing racism and xenophobia in recent years, fueled by the propaganda of neo-Nazis and the far-right Alternative for Germany party.

There are more than 33,000 right-wing extremists in Germany, 13,000 of whom are willing to use violence, and this trend is increasing,” he said, referring to the latest report of the BfV, the country’s domestic intelligence agency.

Maas also said many immigrants were still facing discrimination in everyday life, at work, at schools, or in connection with public institutions and authorities.

The Social Democrat politician underlined the government’s determination to combat all forms of discrimination, racism, and right-wing extremism with a range of concrete measures.

"Let’s get to the bottom of structural racism and banish it from our midst! The study on extremism, anti-Semitism and racism in the police adopted by the Federal Government is at best only a first step here," he said.

Since 1989, at least 184 people have been killed in Germany by far-right extremists and neo-Nazi groups, with more than 50 victims being members of the Turkish community.


 

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BTS has even cemented its prominence in the notoriously impenetrable US music market

Bavarian radio station Bayern 3 found its name trending worldwide after a radio host took a dislike to the latest release by K-pop boy band BTS.

The group's army of loyal fans took to social media accuse the station's Matthias Matuschik of racism after he blasted the band's cover of Coldplay's "Fix You."

What did the Bayern 3 host say about BTS?

Matuschik compared the band to the COVID-19 virus, describing them as "some crappy virus that hopefully there will be a vaccine for soon as well."


"These little a**holes brag about the fact they covered 'Fix You' from Coldplay, this is blasphemy," he said. "For this you will be vacationing in North Korea for the next 20 years!"


Sensing his comments might cause upset, Matuschik said his comments were not aimed at South Korea. "You can't accuse me of xenophobia," he said. "I have a car from South Korea. I have the coolest car ever."


 

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Just How Racist is Germany


The number of reported cases of racial discrimination increased to more than 11-hundred in 2019. That's twice as many as four years ago. New figures released by Germany's anti-discrimination agency show the country is struggling to overcome problems with racism.
 

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Germans and the English are two most racist European states. The English-British self-delusion is simply to another level. They have themselves self-deluded to such level where they actually believe that they did such great work in their past colonies that people there still dream they take over again including in India, HongKong etc. I am baffled to see what leads someone to be so deluded.
 
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CNN reporter of Korean descent faces 3 racist incidents within an hour.


 
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While pointing European racism, I do wish that some Indians from below north who occasionaly use some words and slurs such as Ching Chong either intentionally or unintentionally for people of North East or other asians with similar facial structures should stop doing that. They should learn what to say and to whom, a person who is a complete stranger whether Indian or not, their sensitivities should be kept in mind and they should be made to feel welcomed and at home. I have heard of some instances where Indians permanently residing in Japan have faced and felt discriminated. We gotta follow our traditional अतिथि देवो भव:. Maybe excluding Pakistanis.
 

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My name is Chang and I am not coronavirus': Singer Meiyang Chang on casual racism.





 
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So now we know why the the royal couple got pushed out of royal family. The queen didn't want to risk getting an heir that might turn out something not white enough.

Members of the royal family told Harry and Meghan, a biracial former actress from the United States, that they did not want the couple’s unborn child, Archie, to be a prince or princess and expressed concerns about how dark the color of the baby’s skin would be.

An emotional but self-possessed Meghan said of her suicidal thoughts: “I was ashamed to have to admit it to Harry. I knew that if I didn’t say it, I would do it. I just didn’t want to be alive anymore.”

Meghan, 39, made the disclosures in an eagerly anticipated, at times incendiary, interview on CBS with Oprah Winfrey that aired in the United States in prime time. In describing a royal life that began as a fairy tale but quickly turned suffocating and cruel, Meghan's blunt answers raised the combustible issues of race and privilege in the most rarefied echelon of British society.

Meghan did not say which family member had raised questions about her baby’s skin color, nor did she fully explain why the royal family had not automatically planned to confer a royal title, which would have provided security protection for the child. By convention, Archie would assume a royal title once his grandfather Prince Charles ascended to the throne.

Still, the lack of detail did not rob the moment of its power: Meghan's reference to her child’s skin tone provoked a stunned “what?” from Winfrey.

Harry, who joined Meghan for the second half of the interview, said the couple broke away because of a lack of support or understanding from his family, particularly about the racism that he said his wife confronted in news coverage.


“No one from my family said anything over those three years,” Harry said.


The prince, who remains sixth in line to the throne, described being financially cut off by his family after he and Meghan announced plans to withdraw from royal duties. He said his relationship with his father was particularly strained — Charles stopped taking his calls at one point — because “there’s a lot of hurt that has happened.”

Critics have long detected a whiff of racism in how some people react to Meghan, a professional woman who had been divorced before she met Harry. While initially rapturous in their coverage of the couple, Britain’s tabloids turned against them, publishing unflattering articles about how they flew on carbon-spewing private jets and restricted access to their newborn son.


Some also point out the hypocrisy of Buckingham Palace investigating claims of bullying against Meghan when Prince Andrew, the queen’s second son and Harry’s uncle, has declined to speak to U.S. authorities about allegations of sex trafficking by his late friend, the convicted sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein.


Though British papers have covered every conceivable angle of the interview, some made clear there were limits to the interest it was generating. The Sunday Times of London reported that the queen herself had no plans to watch the program, which is quite predictable, since it aired after midnight London time. It was to be shown on Monday evening on Britain’s ITV network.


Others in Britain tried to play down its significance, pointing out that there are other more important things going on in the country: Schools are to reopen on Monday, and the coronavirus vaccine rollout continues at full speed. At least one prominent British leader said he had no plans to stay up for it.


“Of course, I’m interested in all sorts of stuff around the news around the world,” Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Sunday, when asked about Harry and Meghan. “I think it’s quite late our time, so I’ll probably miss it.”

 

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Another elderly Korean lady (83 years old ) Punched and Spit On At Busy New York Street marking the latest high-profile case in a spate of violence targeting Asian Americans nationwide.

The victim was walking alone near a shopping center Tuesday evening when police say Glenmore Nembhard, 40, attacked her without provocation, striking her so hard that she hit her head on the ground and blacked out. When she regained consciousness, the suspect was gone, according to police.
 

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Britishers say they aren't racist or less racist than their American (American who aren't actually American but European occupying Americas) counterparts but do we have any conclusive evidence? Even in case of American racism, the question, where do they get this culture of racism in the first place, they don't belong to the land they are occupying, they didn't learn it from Cherokees, Apaches or other native tribes? So where did they get it from? The answer is simple. Europe it is.


Since the time these white asses have come into contact with non-whites or non-European whites, where is the history that would give evidence of cultural assimilation or collaboration of these white pricks with non-whites or any other symbol of unity? The truth is that racism is ingrained in European culture and DNA and they simply shy away from the truth citing fewer incidence of racist attacks or incidence in the mostly white Europe which is such an absurd argument to evidence. Where there are no or very few people of color, there will be fewer hate attacks but those few attacks too give evidence of their inherent feeling of racial superiority.


And if we look at history where these Europeans savages have made contact with unarmed and unguraded natives, they have unleashed unimaginable brutality on them.

And they have proved their hatred and complex towards other races in almost all encounters with natives by their acts and also in their words. They just happen to utter their racial hatred when in private with other racist of same white skins. Besides their racial complex, they are actually even worse when it comes to respect woman kind but they feel entitled to comment on Asian and African culture of not respecting and safeguarding women rights, for the lack of development in native world where they are still entangled in their own mess with little knowledge and resources to deal wit these supremacist, partly due to these same white pricks.


“Undoubtedly the most unattractive women in the world is the Indian women, said Nixon repeating “Undoubtedly” again in a venomous tone. -Nixon to Kissinger on Indian Women.

The asshole white cu*t is looking for beautiful women shows great deal about their culture and views on women. That's president. Can we imagine what the rest of them think like. After all, they begun invasion and occupation of native land with rapes and murder of native women and kids.


“To me, they turn me off. How the hell do they turn other people on, Henry? Tell me."
The most sexless, nothing, these people. I mean, people say, what about the Black Africans? Well, you can see something, the vitality there, I mean they have a little animal-like charm, but God, those Indians, ack, pathetic. Uch. - Nixon comparing African sex with Indian.
A 60 year old asshole can't beyond his dick when it comes to women and less spoken on colour, the better.


“The Indians are bastards anyway," Kissinger told the president. "They are starting a war there."
Says a state of landless in occupation of others' lands.


"While she was a bitch, we got what we wanted too," Kissinger said and added, "She (Indira) will not be able to go home and say that the United States didn't give her a warm reception and therefore in despair she's got to go to war."
Proof these butcher are more responsible for Bangladesh genocide that the Pakistani cu**s. Responsible for all the genocides anywhere they are involved in.


Churchill advocated against black or indigenous self-rule in Africa, Australia, the Caribbean, the Americas and India, believing that British imperialism in its colonies was for the good of the "primitive" and "subject races".


In 1902 Churchill stated that the "great barbaric nations" would "menace civilised nations", and that "The Aryan stock is bound to triumph". In 1899 his Boer jailer asked: “…is it right that a dirty Kaffir should walk on the pavement?

He also described the Arabs as a "lower manifestation" than the Jews whom he treated a "higher grade race" compared to the "great hordes of Islam".


'Indians are a beastly people with a beastly religion' - Churchill


In 1955, Churchill expressed his support for the slogan "Keep England White" in regards to immigration from the West Indies.


In 1902 Churchill called China a "barbaric nation" and advocated for the "partition of China"

I think we shall have to take the Chinese in hand and regulate them. I believe that as civilized nations become more powerful they will get more ruthless, and the time will come when the world will impatiently bear the existence of great barbaric nations who may at any time arm themselves and menace civilized nations. I believe in the ultimate partition of China – I mean ultimate. The Aryan stock is bound to triumph.
In May 1954, Violet Bonham-Carter asked Churchill's opinion about a Labour party visit to China. Winston Churchill replied:

I hate people with slit eyes and pigtails. I don't like the look of them or the smell of them – but I suppose it does no great harm to have a look at them.
Churchill's use of "uncivilised tribes" to refer to the rebel Iraqi tribesman, as well as his eagerness to use chemical weapons against them, is today a controversial topic. Unknown to many today, "Uncivilised tribe" was the then-accepted official term for a stateless opponent: the British Manual of Military Law stated that the law of war applied only to conflict "between civilized nations." Already in the Manual of 1914, it was clearly stated that "they do not apply in wars with uncivilized States and tribes"; instead the British commander should observe "the rules of justice and humanity" according to his own individual discretion. It should also be noted that although such language is seen as patronising and racist today, it was hardly unique to use such a phrase in the 1920s.


It's time to debunk the myth they have created of being a race that treats all as equals for their history is almost only filled with mass rapes, murders, subjugation, enslavement, exploitation and annihilation of native worlds. Gestures of respect have only been the tricks they played to decieve, divide and conquer the non-Euro natives. Necessary for natives to expand their culture and boundaries to prevent deception again.
 

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Racism ingrained in European-American culture

Why Dr. Seuss (children literary and cartoonist) got away with anti-Asian racism for so long?

The author drew racist stereotypes in children’s books and political cartoons — but a reckoning has been delayed because of historically ingrained anti-Asian racism, experts say.


----A spread from Dr. Seuss' 1937 book, "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street," includes an image of an Asian man with yellow skin, slanted eyes and a pigtail, holding a pair of chopsticks and a bowl of rice over the text, "A Chinaman who eats with sticks."Dr. Seuss Enterprises

By Taylor Weik

One illustration shows an Asian man with bright yellow skin, slanted eyes, a pigtail and conical hat, holding chopsticks and a bowl of rice over the words “a Chinaman who eats with sticks.Another depicts three Asian men in wooden sandals carrying a bamboo cage on their heads with a gun-wielding white boy perched on top, next to the rhyme, “I’ll hunt in the mountains of Zomba-ma-Tant / With helpers who all wear their eyes at a slant.

The drawings are from “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” and “If I Ran the Zoo,” two of the six Dr. Seuss books that the company in charge of the author’s works announced last week will no longer be published because of their racist imagery, some of which includes stereotypical portrayals of Asian people.

Though Seuss’ art has been around for decades — “Mulberry Street,” his first children’s book, was published more than 80 years ago — widespread criticism of his work is relatively recent. Karen Ishizuka, chief curator at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, said Dr. Seuss' books have been able to get away with this racism for so long in part because of the persistence of anti-Asian racism in the U.S. since the 1800s.

“No doubt, the long-standing prevalence of racist Asian imagery within the larger widespread anti-Asian sentiment in the U.S. added to the delayed response to Dr. Seuss’ racism,” Ishizuka told NBC Asian America. “Generations of Americans have grown up with depictions of Asians that ranged from grotesque to comical. Especially when buffered in Seuss’ rhyming verse, his racist depictions, already normalized in U.S. society, are put forth in jest as if they are innocuous.”

Dr. Seuss eventually edited the image from “Mulberry Street” in 1978, more than 40 years after it was first published, by removing the yellow pigment from the Asian man’s skin as well as the pigtail, and changing “Chinaman” to “Chinese man.” But the character’s slanted eyes remained.


A 1942 political cartoon by Dr. Seuss

His racism wasn’t limited to children’s books. Dr. Seuss, the pen name for Theodor Seuss Geisel (who died in 1991, at 87), also perpetuated harmful Asian stereotypes in a series of political cartoons. From 1941 to 1943, he published more than 400 cartoons for the New York newspaper “PM,” many of which displayed anti-Japanese racism during World War II. All of the Buddhist Mission's leadership, along with almost the entire Japanese American population, had been interned during World War II.




Japanese Americans arrive at the Santa Anita Assembly Center from San Pedro, 1942. Evacuees lived at this center at the former Santa Anita race track before being moved inland to relocation centers. From archives.gov

In the wake of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, when the American identity of Japanese Americans, particularly those of a Buddhist background, was called into question. Just over two months later on 19 February 1942, in the American rush to war, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which authorized the incarceration of as many as 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent.

In his new book American Sutra: A Story of Faith and Freedom in the Second World War (Harvard University Press 2019), Duncan Ryuken Williams, professor of Religion and East Asian Languages & Cultures and director of the USC Shinso Ito Center for Japanese Religions and Culture, retells the stories of Japanese Americans during World War II, with a particular focus on the role Buddhism played. He examines what it meant to be American and Buddhist for Japanese Americans in an era of war, and renewed racism and xenophobia.


American Sutra
. From duncanryukenwilliams.com
As Janis Hirohama writes:

The entire Japanese American community suffered during the war, but as American Sutra shows, Buddhists were particularly targeted. U.S. government and military authorities viewed Buddhism as un-American and its followers as more likely to be disloyal. Most Buddhist priests were swiftly arrested and detained after Pearl Harbor, and severe restrictions were placed on the practice of Buddhism in both Hawaii and the mainland. (The North American Post)

The concern about the Japanese practice of Buddhism fit into an ongoing fear of non-Christian religions in American history, “from widespread suspicion of the so-called ‘heathen Chinee’ [a phrase popularized by American writer Bret Harte in an unsuccessful effort to satirize anti-Chinese sentiment of the time] in the late 19th century, to dire warnings of a ‘Hindoo peril’ early in the 20th century, to rampant Islamophobia in the present century. Even before war with Japan was declared, Buddhists encountered similar mistrust.”

Williams writes of the experience of Japanese American Buddhists in Hawaii:

The early roundup of the Buddhist leadership, whether citizen or not, was a harbinger of a broader persecution of non-Christian religions on the Hawaiian Islands. Under martial law, the misguided presumption that Japanese American Christians were necessarily more loyal to the United States became increasingly apparent, and the historical animus against Buddhism and Shinto intensified.
Thus, during the first several years of the war, Buddhists and Shintoists were restricted from practicing their religion, and had to petition the Army’s G-2 intelligence division for permission, most often denied, to meet at their temples and shrines. Several Shinto shrines, such as the Izumo Taisha shrine in Honolulu, were simply confiscated and declared “gifts” to the city and county of Honolulu. On the island of Kauai, the Military Governor’s Office coordinated the closure of the island’s Japanese-language schools with the dissolution of Buddhist temples. Ultimately, 13 of the island’s 19 Buddhist temples were eliminated.
One of Dr. Suess most infamous political cartoons suggested that Japanese Americans were a threat to the U.S. after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Titled “Waiting for the Signal From Home … ,” the cartoon depicts countless characters with the same slanted eyes and glasses — who are meant to be Japanese Americans — marching along the West Coast and waiting to pick up TNT from a store labeled “Honorable 5th Column.” The cartoon was published on Feb. 13, 1942 — just six days before President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, which led to the incarceration of more than 110,000 individuals of Japanese descent.
Some of Dr. Seuss' other political cartoons during this time use the slur “Jap,” depict Japanese people as animals, and include captions that replace the letter R with the letter L to mock the way Japanese people speak.


A 1941 political cartoon by Dr. Seuss.PM Magazine via UC San Diego Library

Ishizuka is working on developing a new core exhibit for the museum that she hopes will bring greater attention to Dr. Seuss’ political cartoons by featuring original drawings from the library of the University of California, San Diego — including “Waiting for the Signal From Home ... ”

“It’s important to draw attention to the racist images in Dr. Seuss’ cartoons and children’s books because they’re almost insidious,” she said. “The harm they cause is more difficult to identify than when someone calls you a ‘Jap’ to your face. It’s harder to combat.”

Philip Nel, a children’s literature scholar and English professor at Kansas State University, said another reason why Dr. Seuss’ reckoning took so long is that people have excused his racism, especially the anti-Japanese propaganda he created during WWII, as a reflection of the time he was living in. But Nel, the author of several books, including “Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books,” said this explanation doesn’t hold up.

Nel said the decision by Dr. Seuss Enterprises to cease publishing the books — which in addition to “Mulberry Street” and “If I Ran the Zoo,” also include “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!”, “Scrambled Eggs Super!” and “The Cat’s Quizzer” — is owed to the longtime push for diverse books in the U.S., as well as recent movements for racial and social justice.


---- An illustration from Dr. Seuss' 1950 book, "If I Ran the Zoo."

“This is the culmination of decades of work arguing for diverse works and against books that caricature people of color,” Nel said. “The Black Lives Matter movement, I think, has also brought into focus the need for diverse books for young readers. It’s reminded people that one place where justice happens is through representation — acknowledging positive examples and calling out negative ones.”

Dr. Seuss’ image as a children’s literary icon has also delayed the reckoning over his racism. “He’s a symbol of American childhood,” Leslie Ito, the mother of two from Southern California, said.


Sources:
 

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6 Asian Women Among 8 Shot Dead At Three US Spas, Suspect Arrested

Although authorities declined to offer a possible motive for the violence, the attacks prompted the New York Police Department's counter-terrorism unit to announce the deployment of additional patrols in Asian communities there as a precaution



Robert Aaron Long of Woodstock was taken into custody at about 8:30 p.m. eastern time on Tuesday

Washington:
Eight people, six of them women of Asian descent, were shot dead in a string of attacks on Atlanta-area day spas on Tuesday, and a man suspected of carrying out all of the shootings was arrested hours later
in southern Georgia, police said.

Although authorities declined to offer a possible motive for the violence, the attacks prompted the New York Police Department's counter-terrorism unit to announce the deployment of additional patrols in Asian communities there as a precaution.

The bloodshed in Georgia began about 5 p.m. local time when four people were killed and another was wounded in a shooting at Young's Asian Massage in Cherokee County, about 40 miles north of Atlanta, said Captain Jay Baker of the Cherokee County Sheriff's Department.

Two women of Asian descent were among the dead there, along with a white woman and a white man, Baker said, adding that the surviving victim was a Hispanic man.

In Atlanta, the state capital, police officers responding to a call of a "robbery in progress" shortly before 6 p.m. arrived at the Gold Spa beauty salon and found three women shot to death, Police Chief Rodney Bryant told reporters.

While investigating the initial shooting report, the officers were called to a separate aroma-therapy spa across the street where a fourth woman was found dead of a gunshot wound, Bryant said. All four victims slain in Atlanta were of Asian descent.

Robert Aaron Long, 21, of Woodstock in Cherokee County, was taken into custody at about 8:30 p.m. in Crisp County, about 150 miles (240 km) south of Atlanta. A photo of Long, who is white, was released by authorities.

Baker told Reuters by telephone that investigators were "very confident" that the same suspect was the gunman in all three shootings. A separate statement from the Atlanta Police Department said the suspect was connected to all the attacks by video evidence from the crime scenes.

Investigators were still working "to confirm with certainty" that the shootings in Atlanta and Cherokee County were related.

Long was spotted in southern Georgia, far from the crime scenes, after police in Cherokee County issued a bulletin providing a description and license plates of the vehicle involved in the attacks, Baker said.

He was arrested without incident after a highway pursuit by Georgia state police and Crisp County Sheriff's deputies, who used a tactical driving maneuver to stop the suspect's vehicle, sheriff's officials said later.

Authorities said that a motive for the rampage was not immediately clear, and that it was not determined whether the victims were targeted because of their race or ethnicity.

But the NYPD's counter-terrorism branch said on Twitter late Tuesday that although there was no known connection to New York City, the department "will be deploying assets to our great Asian communities across the city out of an abundance of caution."

The violence in Georgia unfolded days after U.S. President Joe Biden used a nationally televised speech to condemn a recent surge in hate crimes and discrimination against Asian-Americans. Civil rights groups have suggested that former President Donald Trump contributed to the trend by repeatedly referring to the coronavirus as the "China virus" because it first emerged there.

A spokesman for the Atlanta field office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation said the agency was assisting police in Cherokee County and Atlanta.

Atlanta police said they were stepping up patrols around businesses similar to those attacked on Tuesday evening .

 

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The long, ugly history of anti-Asian racism and violence in the U.S.


Cpl. George Bushy, left, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are forced to leave Bainbridge Island, Wash., in 1942. They were sent to an internment camp.

People of Asian descent have been living in the United States for more than 160 years, and have long been the target of bigotry. Here is a look at the violence and racism that Asian immigrants and Asian Americans have faced since before the Civil War.

People v. Hall
Chinese immigrants began coming to the United States in significant numbers in the 1850s, largely to California and other Western states, to work in mining and railroad construction. There was high demand for these dangerous, low-wage jobs, and Chinese immigrants were willing to fill them. Almost immediately, the racist trope of “Asians coming to steal White jobs” was born. And in 1854, the California Supreme Court reinforced racism against Asian immigrants in People v. Hall, ruling that people of Asian descent could not testify against a White person in court, virtually guaranteeing that Whites could escape punishment for anti-Asian violence. In this case, it was murder: George Hall shot and killed Chinese immigrant Ling Sing, and the testimony of witnesses was rejected because they were also Asian.

Chinese massacre of 1871
On Oct. 24, 1871, following the murder of a White man caught in the crossfire between rival Chinese groups, more than 500 White and Hispanic rioters surrounded and attacked Los Angeles’ small Chinese community, centered in a red-light district known as Negro Alley. At least 17 Chinese men and boys were lynched, including a prominent local doctor. They were hanged across several downtown sites, anywhere the rioters could find a beam to string a noose. Eight of the rioters were eventually convicted of manslaughter, but their convictions were overturned. No one else was ever punished.

Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882

In the 1870s spawned another spike in anti-Asian racism and scapegoating. In 1882, Congress overwhelmingly passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which banned Chinese immigration for 20 years. President Chester A. Arthur vetoed it, but then signed another version with a 10-year ban. The first law placing a restriction on immigration to the United States, it was extended for more than 60 years before it was repealed in 1943.



An 1885 print depicts Chinese immigrant miners working for the Union Pacific Coal Company fleeing from armed White miners who blamed the Chinese miners for taking their jobs.

Rock Springs massacre, 1885
In Rock Springs, Wyoming Territory, long-standing aggression against Chinese miners exploded in September 1885, when 100 to 150 vigilantes surrounded and attacked Chinese mineworkers, killing 28 people and burning 79 homes. Hundreds fled to a nearby town, then were tricked into boarding a train they were told would take them to safety in San Francisco. Instead, it took them back to Rock Springs, where they were forced back into the mine. Federal troops stayed for 13 years to impose order.

San Francisco plague outbreak
In 1900, an outbreak of bubonic plague struck San Francisco.
It is likely that the outbreak began with a ship from Australia, but since the first stateside victim was a Chinese immigrant, the whole community was blamed for it. Overnight, the city’s Chinatown was surrounded by police, preventing anyone but White residents from going in or out. Chinese residents were also subjected to home searches and property destruction by force. The episode was a prelude to the racism that has been aimed at Asian Americans during the coronavirus pandemic, which former President Donald Trump frequently called “the China virus," “the Wuhan virus,” and the “Kung Flu.


The 1943 film "Japanese Relocation" tried to justify the government's decision to move people of Japanese ancestry from the West Coast to internment camps.

After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and the United States entered World War II, the U.S. government forced all of them into internment camps for the duration of the war over suspicions they might aid the enemy. Conditions in the camps were extreme, blazing hot in the summer and freezing cold in the winter. No spies were ever found. When they were freed, many returned to find their homes and businesses vandalized or confiscated.

Vietnamese shrimpers and the KKK
At the close of the Vietnam War, the United States resettled many Vietnamese fleeing the communists. In Texas, many of those immigrants took up shrimping. “We like the weather, we like the shrimping, we like a chance to start our own businesses,” Nguyen Van Nam told The Washington Post in 1984. As they worked hard and began to dominate the industry, the trope of Asians coming to take White jobs returned, and this time it was wearing a white hood. Ku Klux Klan leader Louis Beam trained his members in commando-style attacks; they patrolled the waters in their regalia and set boats owned by Vietnamese people on fire.




Lily Chin holds a photograph of her son Vincent, 27, who was beaten to death in June 1982.

The murder of Vincent Chin
Vincent Chin was out on the town. On June 19, 1982, the 27-year-old Chinese American was about to marry and was celebrating with friends in Detroit. Then two White men picked a bar fight, blaming Chin for “the Japanese” taking their auto-industry jobs. Outside the bar, the men beat Chin with a baseball bat. He died several days later. His assailants took a manslaughter plea bargain, which carried a possible sentence of 15 years. Instead, the judge gave the men probation and a $3,000 fine. The lenient sentence outraged and galvanized the Asian American community, helping to unite them across ethnic lines and work for civil rights.

The L.A. riots
Tensions had been building between the Black and Korean American communities in Los Angeles for years. Then came the April 29, 1992, acquittal of the police officers caught on camera beating Rodney King. As the city erupted in riots, Korean American businesses became targets; thousands were damaged during the unrest.
‘Burn, baby, burn’: What I saw as a black journalist covering the L.A. riots 25 years ago


9/11-inspired hatred
After the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, hate crimes spiked against Muslims and those perceived to be Muslim, including people of South Asian descent. Only four days after the attacks, aircraft mechanic Frank Silva Roque murdered Balbir Singh Sodhi, a Sikh American gas station owner originally from India, whom Roque mistook for Muslim. The post-9/11 period led to greater awareness and advocacy between the South and East Asian communities.

______________________
Why is racism still such a problem for the most powerful (weaponised) country on earth?

You'd think a Civil War might have been the last word on the issue. The slave holding states of the Old South did battle with the northern states in 1861, fighting for the right to extend slavery into the vast lands of the West as America grew. The South lost and President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation freed the slaves.

But the South was never admonished for having slaves in the first place. History quickly rewrote the Civil War as a "quarrel between brothers".

For the North, what was vital was re-admitting the old Confederacy back into the bosom of the family. Racist views and bigotry - no problem, just don't disturb the Union.

There was no attempt to change the hearts of Southern racists. In fact, as long as the Union remained intact, racists could act as they pleased. They could lynch, and loot and burn. They could murder and rape. They could threaten and intimidate. They could bully.

Hence the rise of segregation, the intimidation of black voters, indeed the denial of the right to vote for black people. And through it all, the mindset was left untroubled - the notion that white might is right, and black people should be treated as second-class citizens.

Of course, that mindset was embedded deep in many of the nation's police forces, which grew out of groups set up to catch runaway blacks slaves as well as maintain law and order.

It's the mindset that led President Woodrow Wilson, in office from 1913 to 1921, to oversee the re-segregation of multiple federal agencies. This is the same president who publicly backed the Ku Klux Klan. It's the mindset that at the turn of the 20th Century saw the vilification of black people as wide-eyed "happy negroes" content with their lot as poor share croppers and shoe shiners.

It's the mindset that saw the erection of hundreds of Confederate statues of Southern civil war leaders, that are now the subject of controversy today. Men venerated as patriots, when they fought a war to break up the Union - men who should have been treated as traitors, not heroes.

Ah, I hear you cry. All that is ancient history, things have changed.

It is easy for white Americans to compartmentalise the past. To see the injustices of yesteryear as having no relevance to events today. African Americans don't have that luxury. The past is the present, the racism is the same.

I know this because having reported from America for nearly a quarter of a century, I'm seeing the same stories of police brutality, discrimination in housing and jobs, and black voter suppression, as I saw back in Los Angeles in the 1990s.

Suspicious deaths in police custody followed by rudimentary inquiries, followed usually by the exoneration of the officers involved. It's a pathetic cycle of indulgence that allows, even condones and encourages, bad behaviour.

There's another example of the past being the present.
I've already mentioned my first US presidential election in 1996. It was a blowout for Bill Clinton against a hapless Bob Dole for the Republicans.

A big issue in the campaign was urban crime and the Clinton administration's controversial 1994 Crime Bill that critics say increased mass incarceration and led to the disproportionate jailing of tens of thousands of black men. Joe Biden helped get that legislation on the books, and his involvement has come back to haunt him.

 

Neptune

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A lot con butthurt in this thread. Yes Europeans are so evil that is why tens of millions of people flood into Europe, United States, Canada and Australia :lol:

Many people around the world are still in concentration camps (China, North Korea, Myanmar). Many people are still beheaded publicly and executed for simply being gay. Many places have no basic human rights or women rights while struggling with poverty, wars and famines but the white man sucks :lol:

Tens of millions of Europeans were enslaved by the Arabs, slaughter by Turks, and invaded and raided for centuries by eastern armies. Tens of millions of Europeans were butchered by Ottomans, Arabs, and Asians. Tens of millions of Europeans died in endless wars. Stop acting like Europeans had it easy; all I see is inferiority complex, jealousy and an ignorance of history.

Many people are apparently ignorant of the Japanese empire and it’s brutality, the Ottoman Empire and its brutally, the Arab colonialism and it’s brutality, the Persian empire and it’s brutality and the hundreds of wars and conflicts in the past couple centuries in Africa and the Middle East.
 
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