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SilentlAssassin265

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All good. A new and novel strategy to bring down drones.
But the question is - how exactly will the hawk/eagle/raptor bring down the drone.
Even if it is a small quad copter drone, the heli blades will be rotating at hundreds of RPM. The metal blades or even composite plastic blades will cut through the soft tissue of the bird. In nature these birds of prey will swoop down and use its claws to grab and kill smaller birds.

Now grabbing a rotating object in the sky may seriously injure or even kill the predator.

So how does the Hawk/Eagle actually accomplish its task.

Even if it is a conventional fixed wing drone, it will most probably have a small turboprop or turbofan engine. The exhaust temperature of even a small turbofan engine will be in hundreds of Degrees Celsius. A turboprop engine will again have fast rotating propellers.

The risk of injury to the Hawk bird still persists.

The claws of the Hawk bird are certainly not made of steel. Or have they armour plated its claws.

I think it would be interesting to know the answer. What SOP's have been devised.
I don't think they are actually considering hawk to take out drone, they will just be using it for surveillance.
 

Tridev123

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I don't think they are actually considering hawk to take out drone, they will just be using it for surveillance.
Well, many members believe that the bird will grab the drone and bring it down to earth. To it's trainer/keeper.

If its job is only to detect the drones then probably more feasible. The camera fixed on its head will relay the footage back to the ground station.

It's role can be extended to actual surveillance of enemy ground targets. If it is trained to fly at an optimum altitude over the target so that the cameras can work properly. Probably can be useful to survey targets very close to the border.

In an ideal situation it would be undetected since it will appear on radar screens as just a bird(which it is).

But again controlling the behaviour of an bird will prove to be a challenge. We are now treading on uncharted territory and the science behind the concept is not proven.
 

SilentlAssassin265

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Well, many members believe that the bird will grab the drone and bring it down to earth. To it's trainer/keeper.

If its job is only to detect the drones then probably more feasible. The camera fixed on its head will relay the footage back to the ground station.

It's role can be extended to actual surveillance of enemy ground targets. If it is trained to fly at an optimum altitude over the target so that the cameras can work properly. Probably can be useful to survey targets very close to the border.

In an ideal situation it would be undetected since it will appear on radar screens as just a bird(which it is).

But again controlling the behaviour of an bird will prove to be a challenge. We are now treading on uncharted territory and the science behind the concept is not proven.
Soviets had used dogs as suicide bombers to take out german tanks. In training they performed very well but in actual battle the plan backfired as the dogs were trained against diesel engine and german tanks had petrol engine.
They ended up destroying soviet tanks instead
 

Tridev123

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Soviets had used dogs as suicide bombers to take out german tanks. In training they performed very well but in actual battle the plan backfired as the dogs were trained against diesel engine and german tanks had petrol engine.
They ended up destroying soviet tanks instead
Yes, the strategy of using animals or birds etc carries the risk of backfiring since there are too many unknown variables.
There is information available about the use of marine animals like dolphins and whales to detect sea mines and other enemy underwater vessels. Unconfirmed reports say that the erstwhile Soviet Union and the United States carried out such research in the past.

Now the trend is to impart animal/other living organisms like qualities to robots/drones. Using AI. Like creating robotic bees etc. A small robotic bee can enter almost any room and provide video feed through its microscopic camera. A terrorist occupying an room will hardly see it as an threat. Many animals and other living organisms have extraordinary sensory capabilities. The attempt is to incorporate these capabilities into machines. Not an easy task.

Don't know whether labs in India have also started research in such technologies.
 

rodeo

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I posted the anti-drone system ASELSAN has developed on Turkish Defense Industry News thread. Anyone interested can take a look.


@Tridev123 @Suryavanshi @SilentlAssassin265 @The Shrike @SwordOfDarkness @arnabmit @karn @Corvus Splendens @Kuldeepm952
 

Chinmoy

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Once you are in GEMS you don't have to do any trials, the said product have already cleared trials. which means if MOD or home ministry want any plate carrier asap, they will order it. No more tenders etc. Being in GEMS means the OEM/Manufacturer is in trusted list of procurement.
Who told you that?

In GEM OEM has to self certify their product first. Based on that they would get order which is subjected to further trials by users. In GEM too user could go for tender or L1 provision before ordering.

The best part of GEM is, without issuance of RFI, user could look out for their specification and order accordingly. It only abolished the RFI and RFP part of procurement. Everything else remains same.
 

binayak95

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All good. A new and novel strategy to bring down drones.
But the question is - how exactly will the hawk/eagle/raptor bring down the drone.
Even if it is a small quad copter drone, the heli blades will be rotating at hundreds of RPM. The metal blades or even composite plastic blades will cut through the soft tissue of the bird. In nature these birds of prey will swoop down and use its claws to grab and kill smaller birds.

Now grabbing a rotating object in the sky may seriously injure or even kill the predator.

So how does the Hawk/Eagle actually accomplish its task.

Even if it is a conventional fixed wing drone, it will most probably have a small turboprop or turbofan engine. The exhaust temperature of even a small turbofan engine will be in hundreds of Degrees Celsius. A turboprop engine will again have fast rotating propellers.

The risk of injury to the Hawk bird still persists.

The claws of the Hawk bird are certainly not made of steel. Or have they armour plated its claws.

I think it would be interesting to know the answer. What SOP's have been devised.
This is neither new nor novel nor dangerous. European airports have been doing this for quite some time, as have some NATO airforces. As an added benefit, eagles/raptors scare the shit out of normal pestilential pigeons and crows, and bird hit rates go down.

Plus, the vast majority of commercial quad copters use plastic propellers which is like hitting the eagles talons with thin reeds. They dont even cut human skin
 

binayak95

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Soviets had used dogs as suicide bombers to take out german tanks. In training they performed very well but in actual battle the plan backfired as the dogs were trained against diesel engine and german tanks had petrol engine.
They ended up destroying soviet tanks instead
Not diesel and petrol - as all tanks that time frame used petrol, but the visual signature of a T34 compared to a Pz
 

mokoman

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makes sense since its an emergency requirement. someone already been making it since past 2 years can give bid.

Only organisations that have an industrial licence and have been registered as producers for the preceding two years may submit a bid to supply the jackets, according to the requirements outlined in a request for proposals that the Army issued last month.

looks like LAC is heating up instead of cooling down

Under the emergency financial authority granted to it by the federal government, the Indian Army is seeking to purchase more than 15,000 bulletproof jackets for its soldiers in order to satisfy the urgent needs resulting from the crisis on the northern frontiers.
 

Tridev123

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This is neither new nor novel nor dangerous. European airports have been doing this for quite some time, as have some NATO airforces. As an added benefit, eagles/raptors scare the shit out of normal pestilential pigeons and crows, and bird hit rates go down.

Plus, the vast majority of commercial quad copters use plastic propellers which is like hitting the eagles talons with thin reeds. They dont even cut human skin
While I don't dispute the statement per se
'plus the vast majority of commercial quad copters use plastic propellers which is like hitting the eagles talons with thin reeds. They don't even cut human skin'

Proof of validity would be appreciated. Are there videos of people actually putting their fingers or hands in between rapidly rotating plastic propellers of drones and not suffering even an abrasion.

If the concerned developers of this strategy are so confident then doubtless they would have conducted ground and aerial trials of these eagles /hawks actually grabbing these drones easily and not suffering even a scratch. Can you share any such videos to buttress your assertion.

Using large birds of prey like raptors or eagles to deter common birds like pigeons at airports is an practice prevalent since a long time. But to equate it to a eagle grabbing an man made drone in mid air is really not an realistic comparison.

(As an joke) All that an adversary needs to do to defeat the drone snatching eagle is to make the propellers of quad copters from hard metal with sharpened edges. No soft, soft plastic propellers.

I am not trying to discourage the people who thought of using predator birds to neutralise small drones. But only pointing out the constraints and limitations of the strategy. If they have actually made the strategy feasible, request them to share the trials success video feed.
 

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