Disputed Bay of Bengal island 'disappears'

RPK

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8584665.stm

Scientists in India have revealed that there is one fewer territorial dispute in the world.

Research carried out by the School of Oceanographic Studies in Calcutta shows that an island in the Bay of Bengal has vanished beneath rising seas.

The uninhabited island has been claimed for years by both India and Bangladesh.

The tiny territory, just south of the Hariabhanga river, was known as New Moore Island to the Indians, South Talpatti Island to the Bangladeshis.

Beneath the waves

Recent satellites images reveal that the whole island is now under water.



Loss of land is an annual reality for many Bangladeshis
There has never been a permanent settlement on the island, which even in its heyday was never more than two metres (about six feet) above sea level.

In the past though, the territorial dispute led to visits by Indian naval vessels and the temporary deployment of a contingent from the country's Border Security Force.

Anyone wishing to visit now, observed Professor Sugata Hazra of the School of Oceanographic Studies Jadavpur University, will have to think of travelling by submarine.

Professor Hazra said his studies revealed that sea levels in this part of the Bay of Bengal have risen much faster over the last decade than they had done in the previous 15 years.

And he predicts that in the coming decade other islands in the Sundarbans delta region will follow New Moore, or South Talpatti, beneath the waves.
 

ahmedsid

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This is an interesting development! Guess what will those Bangladeshis claiming India is out to make BD a Desert will say! Well Folks, I got news for you! Water is all around you, potable or not, but you all wont be in a Desert anytime soon :)
 

Prince

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8584665.stm

Scientists in India have revealed that there is one fewer territorial dispute in the world.

Research carried out by the School of Oceanographic Studies in Calcutta shows that an island in the Bay of Bengal has vanished beneath rising seas.

The uninhabited island has been claimed for years by both India and Bangladesh.

The tiny territory, just south of the Hariabhanga river, was known as New Moore Island to the Indians, South Talpatti Island to the Bangladeshis.

Beneath the waves

Recent satellites images reveal that the whole island is now under water.



Loss of land is an annual reality for many Bangladeshis
There has never been a permanent settlement on the island, which even in its heyday was never more than two metres (about six feet) above sea level.

In the past though, the territorial dispute led to visits by Indian naval vessels and the temporary deployment of a contingent from the country's Border Security Force.

Anyone wishing to visit now, observed Professor Sugata Hazra of the School of Oceanographic Studies Jadavpur University, will have to think of travelling by submarine.

Professor Hazra said his studies revealed that sea levels in this part of the Bay of Bengal have risen much faster over the last decade than they had done in the previous 15 years.

And he predicts that in the coming decade other islands in the Sundarbans delta region will follow New Moore, or South Talpatti, beneath the waves.
end of India-Bangladesh disputeclap
 
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This is an interesting development! Guess what will those Bangladeshis claiming India is out to make BD a Desert will say! Well Folks, I got news for you! Water is all around you, potable or not, but you all wont be in a Desert anytime soon :)
It's not the Indians that will make BD a desert but the Chinese when they dam the brahmaputra river, but there the Bangladeshis become little mice who can't even squeak against China.
 

Iamanidiot

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LF simply not possible The large amunt of water in brahamputra basin is due to the rainfall in north-east
 

Iamanidiot

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It may build LF but the Brahmaputra major catchment area is in India Arunachal,Nagaland,Assam.Assaese are more qualified to answer this
 

S.A.T.A

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India must act as a gracious neighbor and allow Bangladesh to have the island(even if posthumously) :)...

Tibet and Northeast India contribute roughly half of the total volume of the Brahma Putra,if China were to dam it and India were to follow suit,then Bangladesh will be serious water peril.
 

johnee

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BD is in serious danger, I guess. Where will such enormous population go when the threat is imminent to their main land? India must quickly wall the porous border.
 

Vinod2070

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It's not the Indians that will make BD a desert but the Chinese when they dam the brahmaputra river, but there the Bangladeshis become little mice who can't even squeak against China.
Exactly. Even the most venomous Bangladeshis turn pussycats at the mention of China. I have to give it to the Chinese, they know how to keep our two neighbors as their pets without needing to do much. Their hatred for India is enough to make them Chinese poodles.
 

Vinod2070

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BD is in serious danger, I guess. Where will such enormous population go when the threat is imminent to their main land? India must quickly wall the porous border.
Yes. They can go to China in case of any issues. They should expect nothing from India in case of global warming or any other issues now.
 

ahmedsid

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BD is in serious danger, I guess. Where will such enormous population go when the threat is imminent to their main land? India must quickly wall the porous border.
Bangla-Chini Bhoi Bhoi! :p Thats the thing they should do, after all you cant find people more accommodating :D
 

johnee

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chinis to know the art of controlling the naughty ones(Pakistan and NoKo come to mind) and creating nuisance for the mighty ones(who else but the mighty China).

Seriously, the rising sea water seems to be a big threat to BD, if they have any sense then they will be very nice to delhi and in return apply for massive funds which can be used to save atleast some of their country otherwise gayi BD pani mein...
 

Rage

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Thus, what man could not achieve, Nature hath but ordained.


The submergence of the island probably resolved a dispute that could have threatened the maritime borders of both countries.

I hasten to add however, that this is not the last of it. The island has been submerged and has re-surfaced before. It first came to light in 1974 when an American satellite discovered it after being subaqueous for years.

Unfortunately, there is no dispute in the matter. US National Geospatial-Intelligence survey data clearly make a strong case for the Indians. And India has reportedly also established a temporary outpost on the island visited regularly by agents of the Border Security Forces with naval gunships.
 
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Yusuf

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The continental shell thing that demarcates territorial waters is still pending I think,
 

Rage

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The continental shell thing that demarcates territorial waters is still pending I think,
It appears, it, in all likelihood, will be resolved soon. A three-member panel from the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea has been constituted as of March 1 to arbitrate on the int'l maritime boundary dispute.

The panel comprises Rudiger Wolfrum of Germany, Tullio Treves of Italy and Ivan Anthony Shearer of Australia, with Bangladesh nominating Alan Vaughen Lowe, a former professor of intl. law at the University of Oxford, and India nominating P Sreenivasa Rao, a former legal adviser to the External Affairs ministry, to sit on as additional judges at the tribunal.

The two countries agreed to expeditiously resolve their maritime border disputes in February and approached an independent judicial body under the UN Convention to adjudicate the dispute. Interestingly, India had until end-June '09 to demarcate its boundaries, while Bangladesh has 'till July, 2011 to do so. Which still leaves the prospect of lobbying on the Bangladeshi issue open. In the meanwhile, the panel is set to adjudicate on any counter-competing claims and bring an end to demarcation disparities.
 

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