Crisis in Tibet - Opression and Human rights violations by China

ZOOM

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I admit I have a poor English,and I clicked words by heart,not copy anyone in the computer.And at the beginning,I took my efforts as to introduce another angle to people to consider things.I know we are different from you,and we admit that we have many weakness ,many,we face a lot of challenges.Although I am very young,but I can reach a lot fresh things,I know what you mean,in many aspects to see my country ,it is out of the first NO.150,it is one of the poorest countries.But,as you say"Rom isn't built by one day',and many things can't run as we wish,everything has a hard procedure,and we all trust our leaders that they will bring us a more bright future.
When I was a little kid,I was so angry to see that there are so many things seemed to be so unreasonable.Along with the time past away,when I looked more books,when I listened more ,when I saw more,I find everything has its different side.I know there are many bad people in the government,but from the other side,the bad people are promoting the reform too.the trouble we come across inthe reform road are natural,and everything is becoming better and better.
We can't do thing that we are not in the essencial condition.Or we will lose many things ,and we have already missed many challenges.
I am not a person related to the government,but this is what I understand.
I won't get involved into this topic,I have said so much.Thank you,I am very happy to dicuss current affair with you,you have the potential to be another Mrs Thatcher.See you..

Yang mate, here is a free suggestion from me. After reading all your posts in this thread I would like to conclude that you are sensible enough to face criticism and that is a good thing but all your effort of spoiling the image and prestiage of Dalai Lama and all his activitist simply cannot go down well with us. Entire world other china and all its allies like Pakistan must be seeing Dalai Lama as a sepratist but world isn't that fool enough to recognize the same personality as a Nobal individual and second individual who is still trending the path of Mahatma Gandhi's Peace wisdom. I don't understand why does such a simply aspect cannot go down well with you. We are talking about world at large and not a single country advocating freedom movement of Dalai lama.

And hence true request from me, rather then simply calling worldview as a farce and chinese view and all its associated development as truer, please spend time to visit some neutral websites. If your china is so true then why does it has closed entire tibeten region from rest of the world. Unless China don't open the tibet even during the violance till then all your efforts of assuring china as a sesible nation dealing with tibeten issue is truly a waste effort. :angry:
 

Rage

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Yang, I suggest you bring forth rational arguments and credible articles or opinions rather than assail the Dalai Lama with the title of 'liar'- a hardly flattering epithet for a man of his stature.

It grieves me greatly to see my Tibetan brethren being persecuted and oppressed by this inglorious mob. To these our brothers and fruit of our own flesh and kind I can only say:

Patience! patience! ye whose hearts swell indignant at wrongs like these. Not one throb of anguish, not one tear of despair is forgotten by the Man of Sorrows, the Lord of righteous judgement.
 
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Tibetan areas of China are no-go zones for foreign media

http://www.sinodaily.com/reports/Tibetan_areas_of_China_are_no-go_zones_for_foreign_media_999.html




SINO DAILY
Tibetan areas of China are no-go zones for foreign media


by Staff Writers
Xining, China (AFP) March 12, 2009
Along remote mountain roads of western China hundreds of kilometres (miles) from the nearest big city, police stand in the snow waiting to stop foreign reporters from going any further.
Past the checkpoints are no-go zones for the journalists who are trying to verify the government's portrayal of Tibetans as happy and content under Chinese rule.

"This is not an open area," a policeman told an AFP team this week after authorities discovered that the journalists had travelled through some of the checkpoints and made it to a Buddhist monastery in Qinghai province.

Many foreign journalists encountered more severe problems as they sought to travel through Qinghai and other areas of western China this week on the sensitive 50th anniversary of a Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule.

One foreign journalist described the security crackdown aimed at ensuring no protests by Tibetans to mark the anniversary as "undeclared martial law".

Foreign reporters are banned from travelling independently to the Tibet Autonomous Region, but are officially allowed to visit Tibetan regions of western China such as Qinghai.

China's foreign ministry has insisted that foreign reporters are allowed to visit these areas with Tibetan populations, but that local authorities have the final say.

Beniamino Natale, Beijing bureau chief of the Italian news agency ANSA, said he arrived Monday at a monastery in Guinan, a town in Qinghai where monks told him a protest against Chinese rule was held last month.

Nine monks were arrested for that protest, they told Natale.

However police quickly arrived, causing the fearful monks to withdraw and preventing any further conversation from taking place.

The police then took Natale and his local driver to a police station where they were held for three hours, he said.

As police "harassed" the frightened driver, three monks from the monastery were seen being brought into custody, Natale said.

"The driver was very scared by the ordeal. There is a very heavy security presence now and they clearly do not want journalists there," Natale told AFP.

Aside from being ordered out of the La Jian monastery, the team of AFP reporters was repeatedly stopped and turned away from Tibetan-populated areas of Qinghai this week.

During one incident, the journalists were prevented from travelling to the monastery town of Rebkong, where protests flared on last year's anniversary of the sensitive uprising that forced the Dalai Lama to flee into exile.

Police officers photographed them and recorded their identification. Police were overheard warning their ethnic Han Chinese driver not to take the journalists to Rebkong.

Rosa Maria Mollo, Asia bureau chief for Spanish network TVE, and two colleagues were held twice by police last week in Tibetan areas of Sichuan province.

Police interrogated them about their activities and deleted tapes, said producer Isabel Hormaeche, a member of the TVE team.

Police later blocked further filming by intimidating interviewees, she said.

"We were also watched for two nights while being advised to stay in a hotel recommended by the police. Our local interpreter and driver were also harassed and interrogated at night in these hotels," she said.

The crew was eventually escorted from the area.

The scenes encountered by foreign journalists stand in contrast to China's official description of Tibetan areas.

Even as China tightened its security grip in recent weeks, its state-controlled media have issued a series of reports describing happy Tibetans living gratefully under Chinese rule.
 
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China Angered By US Interference In Tibet

http://www.sinodaily.com/reports/China_Angered_By_US_Interference_In_Tibet_999.html

China Angered By US Interference In Tibet

Obama tells Chinese FM he hopes for progress on Tibet
US President Barack Obama on Thursday told China's Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi he hoped for progress in talks between Beijing and the Dalai Lama's representatives. "On human rights, the President noted that the promotion of human rights is an essential aspect of US global foreign policy," the White House said in a statement after the president welcomed Yang to White House talks. "The president expressed his hope there would be progress in the dialogue between the Chinese government and the Dalai Lama's representatives."
by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) March 12, 2009
China expressed anger Thursday over a resolution passed by the US Congress that condemned Beijing's handling of the Tibet issue, saying that its policy in the region was supported by Tibetans.
In a statement issued late Thursday, the National Peoples' Congress (NPC) Foreign Affairs Committee called the US resolution "a gross interference in China's domestic affairs," state news agency Xinhua reported.

The US Congress nearly unanimously passed the resolution Wednesday that urged China to "cease its repression of the Tibetan people, and to lift immediately the harsh policies imposed on Tibetans."

The resolution came amid a Chinese security crackdown in the Himalayan region during the 50 year anniversary of a failed uprising in Tibet that forced the Dalai Lama into exile.

According to Xinhua, the NPC said that the US resolution "distorts the facts of Tibet's democratic reform and glorifies the Dalai Lama, slandering the religious policy of the Chinese government."

In the statement, the NPC said that "all sorts of rights enjoyed by the Tibetan people have been ensured by the Chinese laws," according to Xinhua.

"China's Tibet policy won heartfelt support from people of all nationalities, including the Tibetan ethnic group," said the statement.

"Facts demonstrate that our disputes with the Dalai Lama's supporters is neither the nationals issue, nor religious issue, or human rights, or autonomy for Tibet, but a principled campaign concerning unification or separation, moving forward or backward," it said.

"Tibet is an inalienable part of the Chinese territory and Tibetan affairs are purely China's domestic affairs," the report said.

Earlier, foreign ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said in comments to journalists that the US resolution "disregards the facts (and) makes groundless accusations against China's ethnic and religious policy."

The House of Representatives voted 422 to 1 to approve the resolution. Nine House members did not vote.

The resolution, which does not threaten action if Beijing fails to comply, came amid heightened tensions between China and the United States after navy vessels from the two countries clashed in the South China Sea.

In a bid to ease the simmering spat, Obama invited visiting Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi to the White House on Thursday -- ignoring protocol, which normally sees diplomatic meetings take place between representatives of similar rank.

US House offers strong backing to Tibet
Washington (AFP) March 12 - The US Congress nearly unanimously urged China to end "repression" in Tibet, ignoring Beijing's warnings just as its foreign minister prepared to meet President Barack Obama.

The House of Representatives on Wednesday voted 422 to 1 to approve the resolution, which marks 50 years since a failed uprising in Tibet that forced the Dalai Lama into exile. Nine House members did not vote.

The resolution urges China to "cease its repression of the Tibetan people, and to lift immediately the harsh policies imposed on Tibetans."

The resolution, which does not threaten action if Beijing fails to comply, came amid heightened tensions between China and the United States after navy vessels from the two countries clashed in the South China Sea.

In a bid to ease the simmering spat, Obama invited visiting Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi to the White House on Thursday -- ignoring protocol, which normally sees diplomatic meetings take place between representatives of similar rank.

The Congressional resolution also called on China to resume dialogue with the Dalai Lama, Tibet's exiled spiritual leader and to "find a lasting solution to the Tibetan issue," and saluted India for hosting tens of thousands of Tibetan refugees.

China had warned that US criticism on Tibet would harm ties between the two countries.

The White House and State Department earlier voiced concern about human rights in Tibet and urged dialogue with the Dalai Lama, although their statements were briefer and more mildly phrased.

China's foreign ministry had urged the US Congress to drop the Tibet bill, saying the measure proposed by "a few anti-China representatives disregards the history and reality of Tibet."

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, meeting Wednesday with Yang, said that the Obama administration was "absolutely committed" to defending human rights. She had come under fire from rights groups for not speaking out more loudly on China.

Yang reaffirmed to Clinton Beijing's position on Tibet and expressed anger over the resolution in Congress, the Chinese state news agency Xinhua reported.

"The Tibet issue is purely China's domestic issue," Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu told Xinhua. "The Chinese government and people, as always, oppose any country or anyone to interfere in China's internal affairs on the pretext of the Tibet issue."

Since 1959 Tibet has undergone profound changes "and millions of serfs have become owner of Tibet," Ma said.

Republican Congressman Frank Wolf, a resolution sponsor, had a different view.

"I hope the foreign minister who's in town today hears it -- it is cultural genocide, systematically destroying the framework of Tibetan society," said Wolf, who sneaked undercover into Tibet in 1997 and said he heard accounts of torture by monks and nuns for expressing support for the Dalai Lama.

During last year's anniversary of the 1959 uprising, China broke up another round of protests. Rights groups say more than 200 people died and 1,200 remain unaccounted for a year later.

"Where are they? Let's ask the foreign minister when he goes to the State Department -- where are they?" Wolf said angrily.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a longtime Tibet supporter, took to the floor of the chamber to seek support for the resolution.

"I so had wished decades ago that we wouldn't be standing here now still pleading the case for the people of Tibet," Pelosi said.

"It is long past time -- 50 years -- for Beijing to respect the human rights of every Tibetan and indeed every Chinese," she said.

Another resolution sponsor, Democrat Howard Berman, said that "our friends in China" should consider the resolution not as an attack but as a call to re-engage with the Dalai Lama.

"This resolution is not anti-Chinese. We have deep, deep respect for both peoples" of China and Tibet, Berman said.

"But after eight rounds of fruitless meetings between the Chinese government and the representatives of the Dalai Lama, it appears to many of us that China is not serious about achieving a resolution of this difficult issue," he said.

The sole 'no' vote on the resolution came from Ron Paul, a maverick Texas libertarian who unsuccessfully sought the 2008 Republican presidential nomination.

"I don't think the United States would like it too much if China postured in a similar way on our affairs, and there is really no benefit to these types of actions for us," said Paul spokeswoman Rachel Mills.
 

ahmedsid

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I saw a feature on Tibet on TV and it was showing that Chinese are ruining the nomadic culture of a group of people and now they are being settled onto government residencies. Well, I think China wants to completely make Tibet into a Mini God Less China! Hope they Fail!
 

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Bobby Brown meets Tibet's His Holiness the Dalai Lama!

This is funny as hell. His Holiness on US trip and one of our most wanted singer Widney Hudston's husband Bobby Brow and some of other hip hop rappers said hello to His Holiness and try to introduce themselves & get autograph as well but sadly His Holiness had hard time knowing who he is and he had to say he's Widney Hudston's husband. Funny as hell. :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gdhUilaAok
;;);;);;);;);;)
 

EnlightenedMonk

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The Devil's Advocate (Karan Thapar) interviews don't have good Audio-Video Synchornization. But, please bear with it guys because these were the best I could find... Cheers !!!
 

ShyAngel

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This video, obtained by the Tibetan Government-in-Exile shows previously unreleased footage showing bound and defenseless Tibetans being brutally beaten in Lhasa. Chinese police are seen beating Tibetans arrested following powerful demonstrations against Chinese rule that took place across the entire Tibetan plateau last year. The uprising began with Buddhist monk-led protests in Lhasa, Tibet's capital to commemorate the anniversary of the original March 10, 1959 uprising against China's occupation. The protests spread quickly throughout Tibet and continued through the Spring and into the Summer, as the Chinese government filled Tibetan areas with troops and paramilitary police, brutally suppressing any dissent.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVf1tbkHCNw
 
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http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jYkjmOXxvviT3_tFTwA5tqUk2oUQ

Dalai Lama thanks India for 50 years of shelter

4 hours ago

NEW DELHI (AFP) — The Dalai Lama thanked India on Monday for sheltering him and thousands of other exiled Tibetans who have been forced to flee their homeland in China over the last 50 years.

The Tibetan exile community has been based in the northern Indian hill town of Dharamshala since 1959, when the Dalai Lama, their spiritual leader, escaped over the Himalayas following a failed uprising against Chinese rule.

"We are extremely grateful to this country for the past 50 years, for what the Indian government and the Indian public have done for us," the 73-year-old Buddhist monk told reporters in New Delhi.

"India has extended maximum help to the Tibetan community," he said at the opening of a photography exhibition to mark the anniversary of the uprising.

Dharamshala serves as the Dalai Lama's base. It also houses the Tibetan parliament, offices of the government-in-exile, and schools and cultural centres that teach the Tibetan language and traditions.

China has ruled Tibet since 1951, after sending in troops to "liberate" it the previous year.
 

yang

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I finally know how to post image here,the pictures on the western media :
 

Rage

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The following is an excellent article shared by a friend on the Chushi-Gangdruk, a Tibetan guerrilla outfit that fought against Chinese rule and played a key role in His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s escape to India in March of 1959. It is a must-read and gives great hope on the future of the struggle for an independent Tibet.


‘We killed all Chinese soldiers along the route’

Claude Arpi | Monday, 30 March , 2009, 13:11



Ratuk Ngawang was one of the senior leaders of the Chushi-Gangdruk (Four Rivers, Six Ranges), a Tibetan guerrilla outfit which fought against Chinese rule and played a key role in the Dalai Lama’s escape to India in March 1959. After the 1962 Sino-Indian border war, Ratuk commanded the Tibetan secret regiment, known as the Special Frontier Forces, based in Uttar Pradesh.

Now 82, Ratuk lives in the Tibetan colony of Majnu Ka Tilla in Delhi, and has recently published his memoirs (in Tibetan) in which he recounts his early life in Kham province of Eastern Tibet and the escape to India with the Dalai Lama. In an exclusive interview to Claude Arpi, he reminisces about how his team cleared the way for the Dalai Lama’s escape, killing all Chinese soldiers along the way, the uprising of March 10, 1959, and his meeting with Phunwang, the first Tibetan Communist.

Tell us about your background, how you joined the Tibetan Freedom Fighter Volunteer Force in Tibet.

I am originally born in Lithang in Kham Province. [Around 1951], I met Baba Phuntsok Wangyal [the first Tibetan Communist, known as Phunwang] in Dartsedo which was the border with China. He had come there as a Communist official. I was a businessman at the time. We became friends.


Did you know Phunwang before meeting him in Dartsedo?

No, I first met him in Dartsedo. Phunwang had been a Chinese communist official for quite sometime. When he came to Dartsedo, he had already been given a senior position [in the Party]. He had come with a Chinese delegation. I and three others were invited to represent Lithang at a meeting with the Communist Chinese. They wanted our collaboration. Phunwang attended the meeting and spoke. I also had to speak. I was 22 years old at the time. This happened in 1950, long before His Holiness [the Dalai Lama] visited Beijing [in 1954-55]. From Lithang, Phunwang went to Bathang and Chamdo[to continue his mission].

As Dalai Lama gains, Tibetans lose


What was discussed in the meeting?

At the time, the Chinese were telling only good things such as religious freedom, freedom of expression, assistance and development for ethnic minorities. They were also assuring us that they would not wage war against the Tibetans. This was in 1950. The Chinese had first come to Darstedo in 1949.

Tell us about Phunwang, this Tibetan Communist.

Phunwang is originally from Bathang [in Kham Province]. Lithang and Bathang are very close. Phunwang was a staunch believer in Communism. He had travelled widely to Lhasa, India and other foreign countries.

In 1951, were there many Tibetan Communists in these areas?

There was only a group of Tibetan youths from Bathang who had formed [a branch of] the Communist Party. Phunwang and his friends had studied Communism in China. [Personally] I did not believe in Communist ideology.

The 1959 Tibetan Uprising: Rebels with a Cause


How was the situation in Kham in 1954/1955?

The situation became bad and dangerous at that time. For the initial two/three years, the Chinese were good and accepted whatever we asked of them. Our demands were approved, even sometime with a signature from Mao Zedong. They had promised religious freedom and also agreed not to break any laws of the land.

In 1954, the Chinese decided to establish a school for the poor. They began to assemble all poor and needy people and spend a lot of money on teaching them farming, nomadic works and other skills. They would also give them and their family money. But soon, these poor Tibetans were told that lamas were yellow robbers and monks were red thieves. The situation began to turn from bad to worse.

Why did you have to go to Lhasa in 1955?

I was a staff member in Lithang Monastery and there were good possibilities of business [in Lhasa].

Tibet: The lost frontier


How was Chushi Gangdruk [the guerilla movement] started?

From 1955, the Chinese began to brainwash the poor Tibetans. They told them that it was meaningless to offer money to ‘yellow robbers and the red thieves’. The Chinese told them that their poverty was the result of their offerings to the religious community. This was the beginning of the [so-called] ‘Democratic Reforms’. The well-off families, who had guns and knives, were ordered to hand-over their weapons to the Chinese authorities.

[About Chushi Gangdruk] a meeting of businessmen and monks from Kham and Amdo in Lhasa was held in the residence of Andruk Gonpo Tashi (who was also from Lithang). In 1956, the war had already broke out in Kham and Amdo region. Everyday, Chinese would kill thousands of Tibetans and Tibetans also did kill Chinese.

[It was decided] to fight the Chinese [in Central Tibet]. We had to purchase guns and horses in Lhasa and these purchases were made under the pretext that it would be sent to Kham. But there was no use going to Kham region as there were hundreds of thousands of Chinese soldiers fighting there. The idea to start this movement came from Andruk Gonpo Tashi. Chushi Gang-Druk was established in 1956 and the fight against the Chinese army began in 1958. Later, the Chinese authorities in Lhasa ordered that all the businessmen from Kham and Amdo region should leave Lhasa; the guesthouses were required to report any people from Kham and Amdo. Many Tibetans had come to Lhasa after having fought in Kham and Amdo.


Did the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan Government know about the formation of the Chushi-Gangdruk?

Yes. Probably even the Chinese knew about the meeting. Kham and Amdo businessmen in Lhasa were united because there was no way they could conduct business in Kham with the ongoing fighting. Everybody was willing to fight against the Chinese even those with wives and children. They were totally determined. After the meeting, we started purchasing horses and ammunitions.

‘Ignoring Tibet is dangerous for India’


From whom did you purchase the horses and ammunitions?

We bought the horses and weaponry in Lhasa. In Kham region, we had lots of weapons. Every family in Kham would possess guns even though all might not have a machine gun. Some families in Kham and Amdo could even have 100 guns. Some of these guns were bought a long time ago from the Chinese, while others were bought from India and British.

What happened in March 1959?

On 10 March 1959, Tibetans from all walks of life – monks from Sera, Drepung and Gaden monasteries, general public and the Tibetan army – all participated in the uprising. Tibetans raised slogans such as “Tibet belongs to Tibetans”, “China return to China” and “His Holiness is the supreme leader of Tibet”, “Chinese should return to China”. We knew that His Holiness did not want to meet the Chinese officials [and attend a theatre performance in the Chinese Camp]. Amongst the aristocratic circle in the Tibetan government, one group [led by Minister] Ngabo sided with the Chinese authorities while the other group consisting of officials such as Surkhang were devoted to His Holiness. The pro-Dalai Lama group was able to provide security to His Holiness. If they had not been able, His Holiness would have been handed over to the Chinese authorities. [Our work was to] clear the escape route for His Holiness in Lhoka region [south of Lhasa] by making sure that not even a single Chinese soldier remained on that route. This, we did, by either killing or catching Chinese soldiers along the way. That was in March 1959. Before reaching Lhoka region, all the Chushi-Gangdruk volunteers were scattered in all the four directions. We sent many volunteers along the route from Lhoka to areas near Lhasa to clear the way for His Holiness and to make sure that the Chinese authorities could not capture His Holiness. [We already knew that] His Holiness might not be able to stay in Lhasa, but it was the responsibility of the Tibetan government to ensure that he was safe from the [actions] of the Chinese authorities. We were waiting and fighting in the meantime. On 17 March 1959, His Holiness left Lhasa by foot.

Tibet is not China's 'internal affair'


When were you informed that you would have to accompany the Dalai Lama to India?

In November 1958, I returned to Lhasa from Lhoka where I was fighting. We had contacts with several senior government officials such as the Lord Chamberlain, Phala who was close to Chushi Gangdruk. The prevalent situation was that the Chinese authorities were not heeding whatever His Holiness was saying. The situation had become difficult. We were told that there was a risk of His Holiness being captured and I was asked what we could do about it. If there was such a risk, we proposed that the Tibetan government handle the preparations, while we would escort him. [At that time] there was no clear response. But I knew it was impossible for His Holiness to stay.

Do you remember when you left Lhasa?

I was not with His Holiness when he escaped from Norbulingka. I am only reporting what I have heard. When he came out of Norbulingka, he was not in monk’s robe. He was disguised in a civilian dress and accompanied by two-three people for security purpose. All these preparations were made days ahead. His Holiness walked by foot to a place called Ramatrica where there was a boat. After crossing the river, horses were kept ready. Chushi Gangdruk volunteers were waiting. I sent a message through my servant and a monk that the way was totally clear from Lhoka and that there was absolutely no need to worry. This message was received by His Holiness. I was able to meet His Holiness in a place known as Drachima. Then with 10-12 horse-riders, we escorted him secretly. The photo that you see was clicked there on a hillock. His Holiness stayed for one night there.

At that time, you had CIA-trained radio operators?

There were two men who were handling radio transmissions.

They were Tibetans?

Yes, they were Tibetans [showing their pictures].

Was it a smooth journey between Norbulingka and Tawang?

We had snowfalls due to which we faced many difficulties; horses were unable to walk on the snow and even for humans it was difficult to walk on the snow.

All the Dalai Lama’s family was with him?

Yes, his family, his tutors and many high ranking officials.

Your first impression when you reached the Indian border?

Everybody felt happy that His Holiness could get asylum in India. When we first reached India, there was fighting everywhere in Tibet. The only thought at that time was to seek more training and to get ammunition support and then to fight against the Chinese in Tibet. We had no other aim. Either through war or through dialogue, we had to seek independence. Our thoughts were very short-sighted that time. It is why, we started the [guerilla] Mustang Operation [in Nepal] and 22 Regiment [the Special Frontier Forces under the Government of India]. Almost 100 Tibetans were trained by CIA and parachuted into Tibet where the Tibetans were fighting. But because hundreds of thousands of Chinese had entered Tibet, the operation could not be sustained.


Read all columns by Claude Arpi


What feeling did you have when you reached Tawang?

When we reached Tawang, the Indians had prepared a great deal for providing food and shelter for thousands of Tibetans. We had to surrender all our weapons to the Indian government. We requested India to allow us to fight the Chinese. We were told that we would fight together since our forces had already a good training. But in many ways, we were duped.




Born in Angouleme, France, Claude Arpi`s real quest began 36 years ago with a journey to the Himalayas. Since then he has been an enthusiastic student of the history of Tibet, China and the subcontinent. He is the author of numerous English and French books including. His book, Tibet: the lost Frontier (Lancers Publishers) was released recently.

Sify News
 

EnlightenedMonk

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Yang, can you please give us links to these articles on the internet instead of just screenshots ???
 

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