Comac set to deliver China's first passenger jets

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
The second of 6 planned C919 prototypes undergoing engine tests.

http://www.eastpendulum.com/c919-troisieme-vol-dessai-et-le-deuxieme-prototype

C919: Third test flight and the second prototype


The first two prototypes of C919 at Shanghai Poudong Airport (Photo: COMAC)

AIR


BY
HENRI KENHMANN

NOVEMBER 4, 2017

The program of Chinese medium-haul C919 proceeded this Friday, November 3, its third test flight in Shanghai. This symbol of China's ongoing effort to gain its independence in the aerospace field will soon begin a long series of flight tests to obtain its type certificate from the Civil Aviation Administration of China. (CAAC).

The first prototype of the C919, registered 10101, took off at 07:38 in the morning at the Shanghai-Pudong International Airport. Like the second flight that took place a little over five weeks ago , the aircraft flew mostly around the coastal town of Nantong, much of it over the sea, probably by of security.

According to the statement from the Chinese COMAC aircraft manufacturer , the crew of three pilots and two test engineers conducted 48 checkpoints, including pilot inspection, retraction and landing gear exit, the sideslip as well as the longitudinal and lateral stability.

The data provided by the Flightradar24 website shows that the Chinese aircraft was moving at an altitude of 10,000 feet (3,048 meters). The speed gradually reached 329 knots, a little over 600 km / h.

The C919 landed at Pudong around 11:26 am local time, after a flight that lasted 3 hours and 48 minutes, an hour longer than the previous flight.










COMAC will build a total of six prototypes to speed up the test flight campaign. The second, registered 10102, made its first ignition engines on the eve of the flight of his eldest.

The aircraft will have to carry out a battery of tests on the ground, before being able to reach the sky by the end of the year.

It should be noted that another C919 team has recently completed a mock landing test for airworthiness certification. The tests were conducted from October 10 to 19 at HR Walllingford in England, during which the C919 model simulated landing with the maximum allowable landing weight and an angle of incidence of 12 °.

The first tests, conducted by the British company Element, revealed a post-landing angle of roll greater than that of the tolerance, but the problem was quickly solved by adjusting the parameters of the model that landed on the water stably.

Henri K.
 

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
FIrst two prototypes, just before the first flew to the China Flight Test Establishment (CFTE) in Xi'an Yanliang.



First prototype before its latest test flight:



 
Last edited:

gadeshi

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
9,223
Likes
6,174
Where is the news of Comac FAA and EASA certifications... oh that's right, Comac aircraft have no safety certificate. :facepalm:
Relax, man! :)
As far as it's a clone of A-320NEO, it will be certified relatively easy :)

Отправлено с моего XT1080 через Tapatalk
 

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
http://www.eastpendulum.com/c919-bye-bye-shanghai-bonjour-xian

C919: Bye bye Shanghai, good morning Xi'an

AIR


BY
HENRI KENHMANN

NOVEMBER 11, 2017

A little more than two years after its roll-out, the first C919 finally left his homeland, Shanghai, at the end of his sixth flight to Xi'an Yanliang where the China Flight Test Establishment (CFTE) is located.

It is there in the ancient Chinese capital of 3 100 years that the first prototype of the Chinese medium-haul will start the certification campaign of the program, in order to obtain the type certificate (TC) issued by the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC), one of two certificates not available for commercial exploitation of the model.






The details of the 6th flight of C919 (Image: Flight Radar 24)

The aircraft registered 10101, or B-001A, took off this Friday, November 10 at 11:38 Beijing time. In contrast to its first five test flights, where the C919 mainly toured a coastal area north of Shanghai, the aircraft sped straight to its destination, passing over several Chinese cities, such as Nantong, Nanjing, Hefei, Fuyang, Zhoukou, Ruzhou, Shangluo, Weinan, and finally, Xi'an.

During the flight which lasted 2 hours and 24 minutes, the C919 evolved around 25 600 feet (~ 7 800 meters) in altitude, at a speed not exceeding 400 knots (~ 740 km / h). Both are inferior to the last test flight that took place on November 8, when the same aircraft reached 26,425 feet and 521 knots in a flight that lasted more than 3 hours.

The plane landed in the early afternoon around 14:02 in Yanliang, after a journey of about 1,300 km . CFTE personnel held a ground ceremony where the aircraft passed through a curtain of water, created by two fire lances placed on either side of the runway, symbolizing welcome and welcome (接风洗尘) according to Chinese tradition.


The prototype 10101 of the program C919 in approach of the city of Xi'an (Photo: Mutha)

Search:
Dated Apparatus Difference (j) Lift-off Landing duration Altitude max (m) Max speed (km / h)
2017-05-05 B-001A - 2:01:00 p.m. 3:19:00 p.m. 1:18:00 3,048 333
2017-09-28 B-001A 146 7:22:00 10:08:00 2:46:00 3,048 463
2017-11-03 B-001A 36 7:38:00 11:25:00 3:47:00 3170609
2017-11-05 B-001A 2 7:44:06 11:01:00 3:16:54 6149 769
2017-11-08 B-001A 3 7:44:09 10:57:00 3:12:51 8054 965
2017-11-10 B-001A 2 11:38:12 2:02:00 p.m. 2:23:48 7841746

Specialized in aeronautical qualification and certification for nearly 60 years, the CFTE is the only flight test organization recognized by the Chinese state at the national level. More than 90% of Chinese civil and military aircraft pass their certifications in this location.

The Chinese aircraft manufacturer COMAC has planned a total of six prototypes for the entire certification campaign. The inaugural flight of the second C919 prototype is expected to take place before the end of the year.

The order book of the program has so far registered 730 devices from 27 different customers, COMAC hopes to deliver the first C919 to China Eastern, its customer launch, by 2020. The latter has also sent recently teams to evaluate the cockpit and maintainability of the aircraft.

It should be noted that the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has agreed to process the type certification application for C919. If the plane meets all the European requirements, it will then be possible to see, perhaps one day, means Chinese courier flying in the sky in Europe.

The FAA in the United States has also recently concluded a correspondence agreement with CAAC, but it must be seen how the C919 could benefit from this agreement.(@Armand2REP )


To be continued.

Henri K.
 
Last edited:

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
Where is the news of Comac FAA and EASA certifications... oh that's right, Comac aircraft have no safety certificate. :facepalm:
About the only safety certificate they can get outside of China is the one issued by the Congo.:laugh:
You know what they say about sour grapes my Indian friend...

China Aircraft Exports Cleared for Takeoff Under FAA Deal

https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-aircraft-exports-cleared-for-takeoff-under-faa-deal-1509947425

China Seeks U.S., EU Deals Simplifying Approval for New Planes

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...to-seek-european-regulatory-approval-for-c919

However slowly it happens, recent developments show that Chinese current and future airliners will achieve FAA and EASA certification. I'll be sure to bring up this post when either one happens.

If US and EU lawmakers want Boeing/Airbus access to the largest aviation market in the world, ie China, they can hardly deny safety certification for Chinese airliners in their own air-space.

You're not the most objective judge in this case my Indian friend. Your envy and prejudice of any Chinese development tends to cloud your thoughts.
 
Last edited:

Armand2REP

CHINI EXPERT
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2009
Messages
13,813
Likes
6,596
Country flag
You know what they say about sour grapes my Indian friend...

However slowly it happens, recent developments show that Chinese current and future airliners will achieve FAA and EASA certification. I'll be sure to bring up this post when either one happens.

If US and EU lawmakers want Boeing/Airbus access to the largest aviation market in the world, ie China, they can hardly deny safety certification for Chinese airliners in their own air-space.

You're not the most objective judge in this case my Indian friend. Your envy and prejudice of any Chinese development tends to cloud your thoughts.
They have had that same agreement since 1995 which gets renewed every 10 years, it is called BASA. If you can't pass the test you don't get certified, they aren't lowering their standards, they are duping you into selling more planes to China as CAAC can no longer ban foreign aviation products at will. :hehe:
 

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
They have had that same agreement since 1995 which gets renewed every 10 years, it is called BASA. If you can't pass the test you don't get certified, they aren't lowering their standards, they are duping you into selling more planes to China as CAAC can no longer ban foreign aviation products at will. :hehe:
Yes, the FAA has CAAC "duped" and only the Indian "Chini expert" has the intelligence to see it.

The IPA document was signed last month. It was never included in the BASA agreement before last month's signing.

The Implementation Procedures for Airworthiness (IPA) document allows each authority to leverage approvals completed by the other with respect to design, production, and airworthiness as well as continued airworthiness. The agreement uses the compatibilities of the two authorities’ certification systems and fulfills the commitment that the U.S. and China made in 2005 with the establishment of a BASA. This IPA also allows both the FAA and the CAAC to submit applications for validation for all categories of aviation products and addresses globalization challenges such as complex business models separating design and production.
The C919 already has 730 orders from 37 customers. After CASA certification, that number will rise considerably. FAA and EASA certification will take that number higher still.

China's COMAC says signs 130 orders for C919 passenger jet

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...0-orders-for-c919-passenger-jet-idUSKCN1BU17V

Preach the doom and gloom of this aircraft till you turn blue in the face mate, it wont change its eventual success in the slightest. Go troll somewhere else my Indian friend.
 
Last edited:

Armand2REP

CHINI EXPERT
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2009
Messages
13,813
Likes
6,596
Country flag
Yes, the FAA has CAAC "duped" and only the Indian "Chini expert" has the intelligence to see it.

The IPA document was signed last month. It was never included in the BASA agreement before last month's signing.



The C919 already has 730 orders from 37 customers. After CASA certification, that number will rise considerably. FAA and EASA certification will take that number higher still.

China's COMAC says signs 130 orders for C919 passenger jet

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...0-orders-for-c919-passenger-jet-idUSKCN1BU17V

You will be preaching doom and gloom for this aircraft till you turn blue in the face mate. Go troll somewhere else...
All in China duhr, and can't fly anywhere but the Congo.:notbad:
 

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
All in China duhr, and can't fly anywhere but the Congo.:notbad:
*shrugs* 730 orders is still 730 orders. China has a huge aviation market, why not use it to support local airliners?

The C919 like the Boeing 737 or AirBus's A320 is a short-medium range commercial jet-liner. Mainland China and greater Asia are good enough.

When it eventually does get FAA and EASA certification, i'll remind you of another one of your predictions gone down the toilet.
 

Armand2REP

CHINI EXPERT
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2009
Messages
13,813
Likes
6,596
Country flag
*shrugs* 730 orders is still 730 orders. China has a huge aviation market, why not use it to support local airliners?

The C919 like the Boeing 737 or AirBus's A320 is a short-medium range commercial jet-liner. Mainland China and greater Asia are good enough.

When it eventually does get FAA and EASA certification, i'll remind you of another one of your predictions gone down the toilet.
But they are leasing companies who put down 10% and send them back to Comac, it is like ride sharing bicycles that fill up Chinese junk yards.
 

nimo_cn

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2009
Messages
4,003
Likes
824
Country flag
They have had that same agreement since 1995 which gets renewed every 10 years, it is called BASA. If you can't pass the test you don't get certified, they aren't lowering their standards, they are duping you into selling more planes to China as CAAC can no longer ban foreign aviation products at will. :hehe:
this man has no credibility.

under the 1995 agreement, FAA could simply decline to process certification applied by Chinese aviation company. the reviewed agreement obliges FAA to accept certification from China, which is a big step forward.

China is not asking FAA to lower the standard for Chinese plane, neither it's necessary. C919 will meets the standards, it uses critical parts manufactured by the same western companies which also supply for Airbus and Boeing, FAA better figures out good reasons when it declines granting certification to Chinese plane.

Selling more planes to China? unless C919 fails. all Chinese major airlines are state owned, once C919 passes CAAC certification, they will be required to replace part of their fleets with C919. If FAA declines Chinese plane for no good reason, the government simply orders no purchase of Boeing.
 

nimo_cn

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2009
Messages
4,003
Likes
824
Country flag
But they are leasing companies who put down 10% and send them back to Comac, it is like ride sharing bicycles that fill up Chinese junk yards.
we don't have to worry about the business model. the only key here is that if Comac is capable of manufacturing planes that meets the basic standards of civilian aviation. We will make Comac commercially successful as long as it makes good planes the same way we make CRRC a success.
 

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
But they are leasing companies who put down 10% and send them back to Comac, it is like ride sharing bicycles that fill up Chinese junk yards.
Phuleez son... Your 10% BS aside... Those very same leasing companies have been going to Boeing and Airbus for the short-medium haul needs. Now they're putting in orders for a locally designed and built airliner.

Either way you try to twist it to soothe your jealous pride, the C919 and other present and future COMAC airliners are boon to the Chinese economy and industrial base.
 

Armand2REP

CHINI EXPERT
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2009
Messages
13,813
Likes
6,596
Country flag
Phuleez son... Your 10% BS aside... Those very same leasing companies have been going to Boeing and Airbus for the short-medium haul needs. Now they're putting in orders for a locally designed and built airliner.

Either way you try to twist it to soothe your jealous pride, the C919 and other present and future COMAC airliners are boon to the Chinese economy and industrial base.
Bicycle ride sharing is a boon to Chinese bike factories but turns into a loss as people treat them as junk. Ghost cities are a boon to Chinese construction companies but fall apart before anyone moves in. A bunch of leased planes that are more costly to operate than its competitors is a boon to Chinese aviation but is a long term loss to the companies who operate them and will dump them when the cost benefit is no longer there. Hence why they are only leasing them. The C919 is going to be 10% more expensive to operate than its current rivals and 20% more expensive than the Clean Sky initiative coming from Airbus. When you operate an aircraft for 30-40 years, those are some big numbers.
 

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
Bicycle ride sharing is a boon to Chinese bike factories but turns into a loss as people treat them as junk. Ghost cities are a boon to Chinese construction companies but fall apart before anyone moves in. A bunch of leased planes that are more costly to operate than its competitors is a boon to Chinese aviation but is a long term loss to the companies who operate them and will dump them when the cost benefit is no longer there. Hence why they are only leasing them. The C919 is going to be 10% more expensive to operate than its current rivals and 20% more expensive than the Clean Sky initiative coming from Airbus. When you operate an aircraft for 30-40 years, those are some big numbers.
No substance and the same old BS. Pulling figures out of your ass again?

Leasing companies are a global phenomena. They constitute a huge percentage of order volumes for both Boeing and Airbus. I don't see either complaining. Both Boeing and Airbus have well-funded internal departments solely dedicated to retaining and growing their leasing company customer base.

Airliners are not bicycles my Indian friend. Your unsubstantiated, simplistic argument is kind of sad. I expect more from a troll of your pedigree.

Chinese leasing companies have been solely dependent on Boeing and Airbus for their short-to-medium commercial air-liner requirements. Both companies invested heavily in China to exploit that market. Local leasing companies and airlines now have local alternatives in the C919, ARJ21 and future COMAC airliners under development.

The C919 is a win for China's aerospace designers, manufacturers airlines and its ECONOMY overall.

I'd ask you to stop trolling this thread again, but you've never contributed in any meaningful way to threads in the China sub-forum, so I wont hold my breath.
 
Last edited:

F-14B

#iamPUROHIT
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2016
Messages
2,075
Likes
3,976
@J20! is it true that Rayan Air is a consultant on the project anyway best of luck with the project may you guys get more orders
 

J20!

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
2,592
Likes
1,230
Country flag
@J20! is it true that Rayan Air is a consultant on the project anyway best of luck with the project may you guys get more orders
Ryan Air have only expressed interest in a 199-seat variant of the C919, but have thus far not made any kind of binding commitment to that effect.

Could this new Chinese-made plane become Ryanair's staple aircraft?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/news/china-comac-919-new-plane-ryanair/

Six years ago the Irish carrier signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the state-owned manufacturer to “participate in discussion on the development” of the C919, designed to carry 160 passengers, and has this week said it remains keen on following the prospect of the aircraft.
Ryanair chief executive Michael O’Leary has previously said that he welcomed an alternative to Boeing and Airbus, adding he was “seriously interested in the development of a 200 seat variant”.
http://www.independent.co.uk/travel...eastern-ryanair-budget-airlines-a7723486.html

At the time, Ryanair’s chief executive, Michael O’Leary said; “We are pleased that there is now a real alternative to Boeing and Airbus, and we are seriously interested in the development of a 200 seat variant of the C919 aircraft, and we look forward to its introduction into commercial service from 2018 onwards.
I honestly think Ryan-Air's comments about their interest in assisting COMAC isn't anything substantial but just a negotiating tactic to strengthen their hand in negotiations with Boeing. They operate an exclusively 737 fleet and have recently put in another order for a 100 more.

Any RyanAir dealings with COAMC would be relevant after 2020, when it has its CAAC safety certificate and EASA certification is achieved.
 

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top