Chinese smartphone makers gained 72% share in India at 2020 Q1

rockdog

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
832
Likes
448
Country flag

Smartphone shipments up 4% in Q1 2020 in India; 5G phones capture 2% share

Total smartphone shipments in India in the three months ending March 31 grew 4% year-on-year, as per CMR’s India Mobile Handset Market Review Report for Q1 2020 released today.

NEW DELHI: Total smartphone shipments in India in the three months ending March 31 grew 4% year-on-year, as per CMR’s India Mobile Handset Market Review Report for Q1 2020 released today.

“The first wave of 5G smartphones hit the market, accounting for 2% of the overall smartphone shipments in Q1 2020. The smartphone market grew modestly on the back of good consumer demand before the onset of COVID-19 hit the market,” the report said.

Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi emerged as the market leader with 30% market share, an increase of 3% year-on-year, followed by Vivo (17%), and Samsung (16%), in Q1 2020. Meanwhile realme and IQOO debuted their 5G smartphones, with the realme accounting for most of the 5G shipments.
Smartphone shipments up 4% in Q1 2020 in India; 5G phones capture 2% share

Xiaomi's success was primarily driven by its Redmi Note 8 series, the report noted, and added that the smartphone maker continued to attract consumers with its affordable offerings and strong offline push.

Samsung on the other hand, registered a decline of 41% year-on-year as it forbade the affordable smartphones segment (<Rs 10,000) in Q1 2020, said the report. Its shipments were driven by the likes of A51, A20s, and M30s series.

Realme continued its strong performance, growing by 149% year-on-year. Realme during Q1, realme accounted for 98% of all 5G shipments with the realme X50 Pro. realme 5i, C2 and C3 accounting for the majority of realme shipments.

However, the feature phone segment witnessed a decline of 20% year-on-year on account of migration of feature phone users to the smartphone segment. Yet the 2G feature phone segment grew 6% YoY, with itel (21%), Samsung (20%) and Lava (17%) accounting for the top three spots in feature phone shipments.
Smartphone shipments up 4% in Q1 2020 in India; 5G phones capture 2% share
 

ezsasa

Mod
Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Messages
14,535
Likes
43,032
Country flag
Shame on my countrymen. :frusty:

Chinese are invading and people in India, especially the rich and the middle class are more interested in themselves rather than on national security. Pathetic!!!! :mad2:

View attachment 49626
not their fault, nobody has explained the link between Trade imbalance & national security in the language most people understand.
 

rockdog

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
832
Likes
448
Country flag
not their fault, nobody has explained the link between Trade imbalance & national security in the language most people understand.
I m curious certain things:
1. are they mostly made in India? no matter Chinese brands or Sumsung; if so, there will be less trade deficit anyway.

2. Heard that Jio platforms are doing great, which brands are using them, it's a featured phone based or half smart phone based? Why it's not in the ranking?

3. Heard OnePlus almost take over the iPhone's share in India, is that true?

thanks.
 

ezsasa

Mod
Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Messages
14,535
Likes
43,032
Country flag
I m curious certain things:
1. are they mostly made in India? no matter Chinese brands or Sumsung; if so, there will be less trade deficit anyway.

2. Heard that Jio platforms are doing great, which brands are using them, it's a featured phone based or half smart phone based? Why it's not in the ranking?

3. Heard OnePlus almost take over the iPhone's share in India, is that true?

thanks.
I don’t have latest info on this industry, maybe others can contribute.

One thing I know is that, majority of industry are just assembling here. Parts are still coming from Taiwan & China.
 

airtel

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
3,263
Likes
7,212
Country flag
Shame on my countrymen. :frusty:

Chinese are invading and people in India, especially the rich and the middle class are more interested in themselves rather than on national security. Pathetic!!!! :mad2:

View attachment 49626

Instead of shaming Indians for buying Chinese phones , blame Indian governments (past and present ) which didn't develop electronics industries in India .

People all over the world are buying. phonese manufactured in China because there is no other option as of now.
Tomorrow if jio develops some advanced 5G technologies in affordable price then nobody would use Huawei's products .
 

airtel

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
3,263
Likes
7,212
Country flag
I m curious certain things:
1. are they mostly made in India? no matter Chinese brands or Sumsung; if so, there will be less trade deficit anyway.

2. Heard that Jio platforms are doing great, which brands are using them, it's a featured phone based or half smart phone based? Why it's not in the ranking?

3. Heard OnePlus almost take over the iPhone's share in India, is that true?

thanks.
1. Even if phones are assembled in India , we have to import most of the parts from China ....that causes trade deficit.
2 Jio is mainly a network provider ( like China mobile ) . .... It did not invest large amount of money in mobile manufacturing , because mobile manufacturing business is already over saturated and less profitable , lots of mobile manufacturers are now out of the market including , zte , gionee , lenevo , motorola , blackberry etc .
Jio is investigating it's resources in development of 5G technologies and e-commerce business .
3 . OnePlus can not take over iPhone's share in India because it is an Android phone ...it captured shares of other android phones like Samsung ....and some people are upgrading from Xiaomi/oppo to OnePlus .
 

ladder

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
5,564
Likes
4,949
Country flag
I m curious certain things:
1. are they mostly made in India? no matter Chinese brands or Sumsung; if so, there will be less trade deficit anyway.

2. Heard that Jio platforms are doing great, which brands are using them, it's a featured phone based or half smart phone based? Why it's not in the ranking?

3. Heard OnePlus almost take over the iPhone's share in India, is that true?

thanks.
1. Many brands do assemble in India. Newer models ( immediately after global launch) do generally get imported. But later get assembled in India by parent company or contract manufacture companies. Some flagship might never get assembled in India.
Chinese brands to assemble in India, thus get the 'made in India tag'.
Shipment into India has reduced considerably making India second largest producer/assembler of handsets ( feature phone+ smartphone)
Now GoI will focus on some subassembly to be made in India along with other electronic items under performance linked initiative (PLI). The PLI will be extended to eligible Chinese brands as well.
 

Mikesingh

Professional
Joined
Sep 7, 2015
Messages
6,527
Likes
23,626
Country flag
Read this on Quora. Very interesting! A must read....

Why can't India manufacture mobile phones like China? Is mobile technology that advanced?



Sandip Kumar
, Mechanical Engineer
at ASML
Updated August 17, 2019


Since I work for a company whose tech is extensively used rather they are the world leaders in it, I can give a glimpse how advanced mobile tech is and why India is lagging.
Do you recognize this image/machine/company ?

If yes, then you don’t need to read further. If not then please go through the answer to understand the situation.
Now a question : What’s the most important component of a smart phone ?

Yes that’s correct. The CHIP.
This is single most important component in a smart phone and our Indian tech is outdated by at least 25 years.

If I have to roughly outline how chips are made then it would be in following order :

We are yet to make perfect silicon ingot from which wafers are made. Then patterns (actual chip design) are made on wafers using light and tech is known as lithography.

Now ASML (a dutch company) is world leader in this and owns around 85% world share in this. They literally rule the market. The first picture at the start of the answer what you saw is of the same litho machine ASML makes. Intel, Qualcom, TSMC, Samsung and all other chip making company buys machine from them year after year. You can’t make “advanced” chips without this machine. Not possible. Period !

There are more than 90% of chance (actually 100% if Iphone) that your phone’s chip has been made on this machine. Your SD card, pendrive, hard drive contains the memory made on this machine. How many of these machines are there in India? 10? 20? 50? Naah ZERO!!!

As far as I know there is not a single advanced Litho machine bought by Indian govt. or any Indian company.
Reason ? It’s expensive and crazy expensive. A single DUV/EUV litho machine costs close to $90–100 million. (Not even counting power supply, cleanroom facility and other supplements it needs to run). To give you a perspective : with this amount of money you can buy 2 SU-35 fighter jets and still couple of millions will be left around. We ain’t doing that.

On the other hand China is investing huge amount of money in it. In last couple of years it self they have started 7 such factories. Each with more than 50 of those machines. Imagine how much trouble India has in buying 120 fighter jets and China invested 700 fighter jets worth of money only in buying these machines. (Numbers, I gave is only for perspective. I am not against India’s defense policy).

There is a huge gap in terms of tech and investment between China and India. And we haven’t yet even started properly to bridge that. Brains behind developing these tech are scattered all around the world and many Indians are involved and contributing in it too but not in India. GOI needs to recognize this as soon as possible and get the ball moving.

Until we make progress and some bold moves are taken, we have to bear with “MADE IN CHINA”.
 

Ajax01

Regular Member
Joined
Feb 29, 2020
Messages
202
Likes
550
Country flag
Read this on Quora. Very interesting! A must read....

Why can't India manufacture mobile phones like China? Is mobile technology that advanced?



Sandip Kumar
, Mechanical Engineer
at ASML
Updated August 17, 2019


Since I work for a company whose tech is extensively used rather they are the world leaders in it, I can give a glimpse how advanced mobile tech is and why India is lagging.
Do you recognize this image/machine/company ?

If yes, then you don’t need to read further. If not then please go through the answer to understand the situation.
Now a question : What’s the most important component of a smart phone ?

Yes that’s correct. The CHIP.
This is single most important component in a smart phone and our Indian tech is outdated by at least 25 years.

If I have to roughly outline how chips are made then it would be in following order :

We are yet to make perfect silicon ingot from which wafers are made. Then patterns (actual chip design) are made on wafers using light and tech is known as lithography.

Now ASML (a dutch company) is world leader in this and owns around 85% world share in this. They literally rule the market. The first picture at the start of the answer what you saw is of the same litho machine ASML makes. Intel, Qualcom, TSMC, Samsung and all other chip making company buys machine from them year after year. You can’t make “advanced” chips without this machine. Not possible. Period !

There are more than 90% of chance (actually 100% if Iphone) that your phone’s chip has been made on this machine. Your SD card, pendrive, hard drive contains the memory made on this machine. How many of these machines are there in India? 10? 20? 50? Naah ZERO!!!

As far as I know there is not a single advanced Litho machine bought by Indian govt. or any Indian company.
Reason ? It’s expensive and crazy expensive. A single DUV/EUV litho machine costs close to $90–100 million. (Not even counting power supply, cleanroom facility and other supplements it needs to run). To give you a perspective : with this amount of money you can buy 2 SU-35 fighter jets and still couple of millions will be left around. We ain’t doing that.

On the other hand China is investing huge amount of money in it. In last couple of years it self they have started 7 such factories. Each with more than 50 of those machines. Imagine how much trouble India has in buying 120 fighter jets and China invested 700 fighter jets worth of money only in buying these machines. (Numbers, I gave is only for perspective. I am not against India’s defense policy).

There is a huge gap in terms of tech and investment between China and India. And we haven’t yet even started properly to bridge that. Brains behind developing these tech are scattered all around the world and many Indians are involved and contributing in it too but not in India. GOI needs to recognize this as soon as possible and get the ball moving.

Until we make progress and some bold moves are taken, we have to bear with “MADE IN CHINA”.
Simco Group of India makes these machines, I think for 13.5 nm lithography. But certainly hasn't captured market share like ASML
 

Assassin 2.0

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2019
Messages
5,042
Likes
24,997
Country flag
Doesn't matter how hard customer try there is no alternative to Chinese products.
Chinese be it in television or in Mobiles are packing best features in lower cost.
So this whole program to boycott Chinese products is already a fail.
 

Hari Sud

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
1,757
Likes
2,318
Country flag
Chinese are net gainer because Indian population base is hooked on to cheap internet devices like phones. Too much sophistication of Apple or Samsung or Nokia are not highly appreciated, although these add to the prestige. The key is, how to replace all these Chinese devices with either locally designed and manufactured phones.

No Indian manufacturer has taken the initiative to design or build the smart phones. They too have given up to cheap Chinese devices.

Let us wait and see if Modi initiative to grab electronics companies exiting China succeeds. That will greatly help to kick start any local initiative.

Every smart phone of today will come up for replacement in usually three years. Indian initiative to build its own devices should be ready for that time period.
 

Abhijeet Dey

Senior Member
Joined
May 6, 2013
Messages
1,524
Likes
1,897
Country flag
India's lack of electronics manufacturing ecosystem is hurting Isro's space plans


India’s space agency planned to build as well as launch 17 homegrown satellites in 2019. It, however, managed to deliver only about half due to a shortage of electronics parts.

The absence of a robust homegrown electronics ecosystem is hurting the ambitious targets set by the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro), which has lined up more than 60 missions over the next five years.

These include building new generation communication and earth observation satellites, heavier rockets, return missions to the moon and Mars, and its first human space flight endeavour.

Each of these spacecraft and rockets needs electronic components and systems, mostly imported.

Over half of the electronics components on a large satellite and nearly a tenth for a rocket are imported as they need to meet stringent standards. These components should be reliable, radiation hardened and work through the mission life of a satellite, which could be as many as 15 years.

The need, therefore, for such components is only going to increase as the space agency becomes more aggressive in pursuing cutting-edge missions.

Congress Party leader and Rajya Sabha member Jairam Ramesh has, in fact, raised concerns over the country’s high import of electronics, arguing it represents a crucial gap in Isro’s capabilities.

“Over 80% of electronics components are imported. Carbon composites are sourced from only one Japanese company. Microprocessor design capability is impressive, but the country still awaits a state-of the-art fabrication and manufacturing facility. All these gaps need to be filled urgently,” Ramesh, who is the chairman of the House panel on science, technology, environment, forests and climate change, is believed to have written in a letter to Rajya Sabha Chairman Venkaiah Naidu, according to a report by The Hindustan Times.

Ramesh did not respond to calls or text messages seeking comment.

“It is a direct correlation to what is happening in the smartphone industry,” says Parv Sharma, research analyst at Counterpoint Research. “We don’t manufacture them, only assemble (them) here. India imports smartphones (with) semiconductor chips and electronics in semi-knockdown or completely knockdown kits, and we assemble the phones here,” he explains.

India is a big importer of electronics primarily because the homegrown industry is virtually absent. In fiscal year 2019, India’s electronics imports stood at $55.6 billion, most of it for use in smartphones.

Efforts to build local semiconductor fabrication units over the last two decades have been unsuccessful due to high costs and the lack of a stable policy.

“The key thing for electronics manufacturing is semiconductor fabs,” says Sharma.

FAB EFFORT
To be sure, Isro owns a fabrication facility that is capable of producing chips with 45 nanometre technology.

Since it took over Semi-Conductor Laboratory, a public sector undertaking a decade ago, it has upgraded the fab and developed a micro-electrical mechanical system (MeMs).

The biggest shift has been in building the Vikram processor, crucial for navigation and guidance control of Isro’s rockets.

“There are some critical components, such as the Vikram processor, that we have already built,” says Dr K Radhakrishnan, former chairman of Isro. The space agency has been collaborating with industry locally to produce electronics as well as systems for its satellites, he adds.

“We have to get the sub-systems from the industry or from our own (Isro) system. There are very few (global) vendors who can supply these systems,” he says.

Isro has stepped up efforts to build capabilities with local manufacturers to meet its requirements for electronics as well as tap the global opportunity for satellites.

According to estimates by Stratview Research, the global space electronics market is projected to touch $1.62 billion by 2024.

The growth is expected to come from increased production of satellites, especially small ones; the market entry of commercial space companies and as more countries look to build satellites on their own.

In September, Bengaluru-based Centum Electronics set up a new facility to design, develop and make electronic components for both Isro’s satellites and rockets.

“Keeping in mind the growing number of missions of Isro, we have made significant investments to ensure (that) we can deliver products with the right quality, technology and in required quantities to be a trusted partner for Isro,” says Apparao Mallavarapu, CMD of Centum Group.

The number of companies that are taking up the opportunity is, however, still small, says an Isro official who did not wish to be named.

“Earlier, we had the issue of volumes. Now, we are giving them our roadmap of satellites and spacecraft and assuring them orders. It is becoming difficult to get companies even to build rectifiers and Integrated Circuits,” says the official.

NEW POLICY PUSH
Texas Instruments chose Bengaluru to set up its first design base outside of the United States in the late Eighties, and since then India has emerged as a design hub for most global companies — Intel, Qualcomm, ZTE, ARM and AMD — to build their next-generation chips.

This has also helped spawn a startup ecosystem where entrepreneurs have set up fabless chip design companies — designing chips, but getting them assembled, tested and manufactured in independent foundries such as TSMC in Taiwan.

While India has emerged as a global hub for chip design, making them at foundries abroad could be an interim step before local fabs emerge, say experts.

India should tap the homegrown expertise in chip and electronic systems design, says Naga Bharath Daka, cofounder and chief operating officer of Skyroot, the first private sector company designing a rocket that will likely launch by 2021.

“The semiconductor fabrication industry...did not take off in India, mainly because it is highly investment intensive. Even globally, pureplay semiconductor manufacturing is becoming highly consolidated,” says Daka. “What we can only hope for is the emergence of a good number of fabless semiconductor companies based out of India, which we are seeing in the start-up ecosystem.”

The Hyderabad-based company, founded by four former Isro scientists, designs rockets that can carry small satellites into lowearth orbits.

“Isro should primarily target to replace all critical chipsets if any (where we are dependent on a single maker or vendor) that are currently being imported, with indigenous chip designs that can be manufactured in the required quantities from pure-play foundries externally,” Daka adds.

Sanjay Nekkanti, the founder of Dhruva Space, says “Isro builds large satellites weighing over 500 kg with over 10 years’ mission life. Mission delays of 1-2 years is inevitable with space agencies given the complexities involved.”

The company, which builds satellites weighing up to 100 kg, is using commercial electronics qualified for space using proprietary screening methods, he says.

A new electronics policy, unveiled by the government in February last year, could make the country a hub for electronics manufacturing, though.

The policy aims to promote manufacturing and export along the entire electronics value chain, with an emphasis on providing a special package of incentives for mega high-tech projects, including semiconductor facilities. It also entails creating a Sovereign Patent Fund to promote the development and acquisition of intellectual property in the sector.

The thrust is on fabless chip design, and intended to boost the medical, automotive, power electronics and strategic electronics industry. The plan is to make the local electronics industry generate over $400 billion in five years.

If the policy push works as intended, India could move one step ahead in reducing electronics imports significantly by 2025.
 

Assassin 2.0

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2019
Messages
5,042
Likes
24,997
Country flag
Chinese are net gainer because Indian population base is hooked on to cheap internet devices like phones. Too much sophistication of Apple or Samsung or Nokia are not highly appreciated, although these add to the prestige. The key is, how to replace all these Chinese devices with either locally designed and manufactured phones.

No Indian manufacturer has taken the initiative to design or build the smart phones. They too have given up to cheap Chinese devices.

Let us wait and see if Modi initiative to grab electronics companies exiting China succeeds. That will greatly help to kick start any local initiative.

Every smart phone of today will come up for replacement in usually three years. Indian initiative to build its own devices should be ready for that time period.
Why to buy iPhone when they ask for absurd prices in the first place and second they don't manufacture shit in india.
At least cost of one plus products is cheaper in india compared to western market's meanwhile Iphone sold in india are at least 20-25% more expensive in india compared to west.
People now day see which product have highest specs and in that place Chinese are shining. India have market of both type of products expensive phones and cheap phone's.
 

Abhijeet Dey

Senior Member
Joined
May 6, 2013
Messages
1,524
Likes
1,897
Country flag
Semi-Conductor Laboratory (SCL), ISRO


Semi-Conductor Laboratory (SCL) at Chandigarh, an autonomous body under DOS, is a Research & Development (R&D) Unit engaged in Design, Development, Fabrication, Assembly, Packaging, Testing & Reliability Assurance of Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) and Opto-Electronic / Imaging & Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) Devices. SCL is working towards creating a strong microelectronics base in the country and enhance capabilities in Very Large Scale Integrated circuit (VLSI) domain. SCL is also engaged in Hi-Rel Board Fabrication and Component Screening for ISRO Units and Assembly of Radiosonde for Atmospheric Studies. SCL continues to strive for technological excellence in the field of semiconductor fabrication.
 

Super lca

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
May 22, 2020
Messages
170
Likes
318
Country flag
Doesn't matter how hard customer try there is no alternative to Chinese products.
Chinese be it in television or in Mobiles are packing best features in lower cost.
So this whole program to boycott Chinese products is already a fail.
Nope except mobile phones there are a lot of alternatives to china made electronics but it's the real intent we are lacking as of now
 

ezsasa

Mod
Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Messages
14,535
Likes
43,032
Country flag
Nope except mobile phones there are a lot of alternatives to china made electronics but it's the real intent we are lacking as of now
there is no “we” here.... it’s the Indian money bags who are not willing to take the risk.

Govt can only facilitate, it’s just allotment of land for govt.
 

Latest Replies

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top