China's first stealth jet looks an awful lot like the US's first stealth fighter — here's how the J-20 and the F-22 stack up

xizhimen

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China's first stealth jet looks an awful lot like the US's first stealth fighter — here's how the J-20 and the F-22 stack up
Benjamin Brimelow
8 hours ago


Chinese J-20s, left, and an F-22 Raptor. AP Photo/Kin Cheung, REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

  • A high-profile part of China's ongoing military modernization is the J-20, the country's first stealth fighter jet.
  • The J-20, likely based on stolen US designs, looks a lot like the US Air Force's F-22, but appearance isn't the only similarity between the two fifth-generation fighters.
Aside from China's aircraft carriers and ballistic-missile programs, no weapon system has captured as much attention as the J-20 Mighty Dragon, China's first stealth fighter.

The aircraft is the world's third operational fifth-generation stealth fighter, the only one in official service that wasn't designed by the US or its allies.

Two J-20s were seen at a Chinese air base near the Indian border after tensions between the two countries spiked, rumors of a twin-seat variant under development have spread on social media, and last month, two J-20s were shown conducting a fighter drill in footage released by Chinese state media.

Conventional wisdom holds that the J-20 is currently unable to face the US Air Force's F-22 in a straight-up dogfight. But the J-20, and China's stealth program overall, is young, and may very well be maturing.


The J-20's development began in earnest after the F-22 was unveiled. Its exact specifications are not known, but it is believed to be capable of a maximum speed close to Mach 2 (1,535mph), a ceiling around 60,000 feet, and a range of almost 700 miles.

The jet, likely based on stolen plans from the American stealth program, made its first test flight in 2011 and entered official service in 2017. It is estimated that 50 to 60 J-20s are in service with an unknown number under construction.

A large internal weapons bay is capable of carrying at least four long-range air-to-air missiles, while two more lateral bays can each hold a single shorter-range missile. The Chinese have also experimented with external hardpoints that enable the J-20 to carry an additional four missiles.

The F-22 Raptor, first flown in 1997 and adopted in 2005, has a main internal weapons bay that can carry six long-range air-to-air missiles, and two lateral bays with single shorter-range missiles. Four external hardpoints allow it to carry more missiles, and it has a 20-mm rotary cannon for close-range combat.


There is broad consensus that the F-22 would win a dogfight with a J-20. Its higher speed, operational ceiling, superior stealth technology, and more experienced pilots give it an edge over the J-20. But that advantage may soon slip away.

"There are numerous factors that are in China's favor as time goes on," Timothy Heath, a senior defense researcher at the Rand Corporation, told Insider

A development gap

A Chinese J-20 stealth fighter. Reuters

Much of the F-22's advantage is based on something that China has always had difficulty with: high-end engines.

China's first attempts at an engine for the J-20 were so bad that they had to use Russian Saturn AL-31 engines for the first production models. Later variants would use the domestically made WS-10, but it is still considered underpowered and unreliable.

But unlike the F-22, which ceased production in 2011, the J-20 program is ongoing — meaning it is constantly undergoing changes and refits.

"China continues to refine and improve on the aircraft as the manufacturing goes on," Heath said. "They'll learn lessons and they can tweak and modify their aircraft, whereas in the US that's obviously much harder to do with all the factories shuttered."

This means that future J-20s will likely close the gap with the F-22.

The Chinese are developing a new engine, the WS-15, which will be significantly more powerful. In the meantime, they have fitted their latest model, the J-20B, with newer Russian-made engines capable of thrust-vectoring, which the WS-15 will also have — an advantage the F-22 will no longer enjoy over the J-20.

The development gap extends to armaments as well.

The J-20's long-range missile, the PL-15, has a range over 200 km and can reach speeds up to Mach 4, outclassing its US counterpart, the AIM-120, which is believed to have a 160 km range.

China is also developing a newer missile that will supposedly have a 300 km range.

A different focus, a different mission

A Chinese J-20 stealth fighter at an air show in Zhuhai in China's Guangdong Province, November 1, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

The development gap is due largely to US's focus on fighting insurgencies instead of state actors.


"We took our foot of the gas for too long because of Iraq and Afghanistan," Douglas Birkey, executive director for the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Power Studies, told Insider.

As a result, Birkey added, "you have fifth-generation aircraft hauling third-generation missiles, and that gap has got to close."

In contrast, China — having seen the destruction US airpower wrought in Yugoslavia, Iraq, and Afghanistan — focused its efforts on creating systems capable of taking on US forces. "That was the baseline threat that they organized everything against," Birkey said.

The J-20 is not designed or intended to fight a dogfight in the traditional sense — it doesn't even have a cannon for close-range combat. Rather, it is intended to engage hostile aircraft from very long range with missiles.

"It's almost like an aerial sniper," Heath said. "Instead of two fighters punching each other, these aircraft are designed to fire from very long range, largely launching while undetected."

They are also meant to be integrated into a larger system in which information is passed among aircraft, enabling the J-20 to engage enemies detected by other platforms, like friendly aircraft or ground and naval radars.

Its likely targets would be enemy fighters already engaged in dogfights with other Chinese fighters, unguarded bombers, or support assets like aerial refueling tankers, AWACS and JSTARS command and control aircraft, and surveillance drones.

The F-22 is designed to fight in a similar way.

"Any fifth-generation aircraft is not meant to get into a classic dogfight scenario," Birkey said. "They are supposed to understand the threat environment ahead of the curve, going into it sufficiently such that they can take care of business, get a long-range shot, and get out of there."

Keeping the advantage

An F-22. Scott Knuteson/USAF

Despite the development gap, the US is committing to keeping its advantage.

In addition to updating the AIM-120, a new long-range missile, the AIM-260, is in development. Although production may have ceased, the F-22 is still getting hardware and software upgrades.

Moreover, the F-22 will likely never go into battle alone. It will likely be accompanied by Air Force F-15s and F-16s, Navy F/A-18s, and, of course, the F-35 — the newest stealth fighter, variants of which are in service with the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps.


"It's good to try to imagine teams of stealth and non-stealth working together with other platforms to try and outmaneuver and defeat the enemy," Heath said.

The US has also "built and flown" a prototype sixth-generation fighter, part of the Next Generation Air Dominance program, years ahead of schedule.

US Air Force pilots and aircraft also have far more experience. US pilots log 50% more flight hours every year on average than Chinese pilots, and the F-22 has actually operated in active war zones.

But China is just as committed. It is developing a lighter stealth fighter, the FC-31, and unlike the US, China's leaders are not as constrained by domestic politics or questions about funding.

"They can develop technology cheaper. They can steal from about anybody with impunity, and they've got mass advantage that we don't have," Birkey said.

China's larger industrial capability, combined with its commitment to become a dominant military power and the US focus elsewhere, may seriously change the calculus going forward.

"We've got to make up for 20 years of taking our eye off the ball," Birkey said. "That was a really bad mistake."

 

NAMICA

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China's first stealth jet looks an awful lot like the US's first stealth fighter — here's how the J-20 and the F-22 stack up
Benjamin Brimelow
8 hours ago


Chinese J-20s, left, and an F-22 Raptor. AP Photo/Kin Cheung, REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

  • A high-profile part of China's ongoing military modernization is the J-20, the country's first stealth fighter jet.
  • The J-20, likely based on stolen US designs, looks a lot like the US Air Force's F-22, but appearance isn't the only similarity between the two fifth-generation fighters.
Aside from China's aircraft carriers and ballistic-missile programs, no weapon system has captured as much attention as the J-20 Mighty Dragon, China's first stealth fighter.

The aircraft is the world's third operational fifth-generation stealth fighter, the only one in official service that wasn't designed by the US or its allies.

Two J-20s were seen at a Chinese air base near the Indian border after tensions between the two countries spiked, rumors of a twin-seat variant under development have spread on social media, and last month, two J-20s were shown conducting a fighter drill in footage released by Chinese state media.

Conventional wisdom holds that the J-20 is currently unable to face the US Air Force's F-22 in a straight-up dogfight. But the J-20, and China's stealth program overall, is young, and may very well be maturing.


The J-20's development began in earnest after the F-22 was unveiled. Its exact specifications are not known, but it is believed to be capable of a maximum speed close to Mach 2 (1,535mph), a ceiling around 60,000 feet, and a range of almost 700 miles.

The jet, likely based on stolen plans from the American stealth program, made its first test flight in 2011 and entered official service in 2017. It is estimated that 50 to 60 J-20s are in service with an unknown number under construction.

A large internal weapons bay is capable of carrying at least four long-range air-to-air missiles, while two more lateral bays can each hold a single shorter-range missile. The Chinese have also experimented with external hardpoints that enable the J-20 to carry an additional four missiles.

The F-22 Raptor, first flown in 1997 and adopted in 2005, has a main internal weapons bay that can carry six long-range air-to-air missiles, and two lateral bays with single shorter-range missiles. Four external hardpoints allow it to carry more missiles, and it has a 20-mm rotary cannon for close-range combat.


There is broad consensus that the F-22 would win a dogfight with a J-20. Its higher speed, operational ceiling, superior stealth technology, and more experienced pilots give it an edge over the J-20. But that advantage may soon slip away.

"There are numerous factors that are in China's favor as time goes on," Timothy Heath, a senior defense researcher at the Rand Corporation, told Insider

A development gap

A Chinese J-20 stealth fighter. Reuters

Much of the F-22's advantage is based on something that China has always had difficulty with: high-end engines.

China's first attempts at an engine for the J-20 were so bad that they had to use Russian Saturn AL-31 engines for the first production models. Later variants would use the domestically made WS-10, but it is still considered underpowered and unreliable.

But unlike the F-22, which ceased production in 2011, the J-20 program is ongoing — meaning it is constantly undergoing changes and refits.

"China continues to refine and improve on the aircraft as the manufacturing goes on," Heath said. "They'll learn lessons and they can tweak and modify their aircraft, whereas in the US that's obviously much harder to do with all the factories shuttered."

This means that future J-20s will likely close the gap with the F-22.

The Chinese are developing a new engine, the WS-15, which will be significantly more powerful. In the meantime, they have fitted their latest model, the J-20B, with newer Russian-made engines capable of thrust-vectoring, which the WS-15 will also have — an advantage the F-22 will no longer enjoy over the J-20.

The development gap extends to armaments as well.

The J-20's long-range missile, the PL-15, has a range over 200 km and can reach speeds up to Mach 4, outclassing its US counterpart, the AIM-120, which is believed to have a 160 km range.

China is also developing a newer missile that will supposedly have a 300 km range.

A different focus, a different mission

A Chinese J-20 stealth fighter at an air show in Zhuhai in China's Guangdong Province, November 1, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

The development gap is due largely to US's focus on fighting insurgencies instead of state actors.


"We took our foot of the gas for too long because of Iraq and Afghanistan," Douglas Birkey, executive director for the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Power Studies, told Insider.

As a result, Birkey added, "you have fifth-generation aircraft hauling third-generation missiles, and that gap has got to close."

In contrast, China — having seen the destruction US airpower wrought in Yugoslavia, Iraq, and Afghanistan — focused its efforts on creating systems capable of taking on US forces. "That was the baseline threat that they organized everything against," Birkey said.

The J-20 is not designed or intended to fight a dogfight in the traditional sense — it doesn't even have a cannon for close-range combat. Rather, it is intended to engage hostile aircraft from very long range with missiles.

"It's almost like an aerial sniper," Heath said. "Instead of two fighters punching each other, these aircraft are designed to fire from very long range, largely launching while undetected."

They are also meant to be integrated into a larger system in which information is passed among aircraft, enabling the J-20 to engage enemies detected by other platforms, like friendly aircraft or ground and naval radars.

Its likely targets would be enemy fighters already engaged in dogfights with other Chinese fighters, unguarded bombers, or support assets like aerial refueling tankers, AWACS and JSTARS command and control aircraft, and surveillance drones.

The F-22 is designed to fight in a similar way.

"Any fifth-generation aircraft is not meant to get into a classic dogfight scenario," Birkey said. "They are supposed to understand the threat environment ahead of the curve, going into it sufficiently such that they can take care of business, get a long-range shot, and get out of there."

Keeping the advantage

An F-22. Scott Knuteson/USAF

Despite the development gap, the US is committing to keeping its advantage.

In addition to updating the AIM-120, a new long-range missile, the AIM-260, is in development. Although production may have ceased, the F-22 is still getting hardware and software upgrades.

Moreover, the F-22 will likely never go into battle alone. It will likely be accompanied by Air Force F-15s and F-16s, Navy F/A-18s, and, of course, the F-35 — the newest stealth fighter, variants of which are in service with the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps.


"It's good to try to imagine teams of stealth and non-stealth working together with other platforms to try and outmaneuver and defeat the enemy," Heath said.

The US has also "built and flown" a prototype sixth-generation fighter, part of the Next Generation Air Dominance program, years ahead of schedule.

US Air Force pilots and aircraft also have far more experience. US pilots log 50% more flight hours every year on average than Chinese pilots, and the F-22 has actually operated in active war zones.

But China is just as committed. It is developing a lighter stealth fighter, the FC-31, and unlike the US, China's leaders are not as constrained by domestic politics or questions about funding.

"They can develop technology cheaper. They can steal from about anybody with impunity, and they've got mass advantage that we don't have," Birkey said.

China's larger industrial capability, combined with its commitment to become a dominant military power and the US focus elsewhere, may seriously change the calculus going forward.

"We've got to make up for 20 years of taking our eye off the ball," Birkey said. "That was a really bad mistake."

Welcome back.
 

johnq

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Stealth is not just about having an internal weapons bay. The radar/radome, canopy, IRST on the J-20 are all big reflectors of radar from the front. Which is why the J-20 is NOT STEALTHY, and has been repeatedly tracked by SU-30MKI radar in Ladakh. The canards, joints and gaps in between are big radar resonance hotspots from the front. This is one of the reasons the US chose not to go with canards in F-22. The Chinese chose the canards because it didn't make any difference since they simply don't have the technology to make a true stealth fighter. The Chinese don't have the technology to reduce the RCS contribution from the radar/radome in the front, which is one of the radar hotspots in any fighter, including J-20. The F-22 is a true stealth fighter with a RCS in X band of less than 0.0001 sq meters. At best, the J-20 is a reduced RCS fighter even from the front, and NOWHERE in the ballpark of F-22 level of stealth. This, combined with vastly inferior avionics that are stolen from downgraded 1990s Russian fighters (SU-35) that China recently imported, means that the F-22 and the F-35 will completely destroy the J-20 in any conflict.

The J-20 is not stealthy; it can be easily tracked by modern radars from all angles, and has been repeatedly tracked by Indian Air Force in Ladakh. This is because China still has no way to hide radar reflection from its radar/radome and canopy in the front, and from multiple resonance hotspots such as canard joints and other control surfaces. The radar reflections from the sides and back are even worse.

The Chinese material technology is so far behind that the canopy, IRST, canards and canard joints, control surfaces, inlet features and other resonance hotspots also increase the RCS of the J-20 to a point where it can easily be tracked by modern radars. Chinese ECM is also very primitive, and is stolen from SU-35 it imported from Russia very recently. Luckily the Russians know that Chinese are thieves and liars, so they only gave very primitive technology on the SU-35.

The avionics on the J-20 are very primitive, as they are stolen from the SU-35s that China recently imported from Russia. If China did not need to steal SU-35 avionics, why would China order the SU-35 so recently, with a small order of only 24 aircraft? Russia only gave a very downgraded version of its 1990s radar and other avionics on the SU-35 sold to China. F-22's radar, ECM and other avionics are 2 generations ahead of the avionics on the J-20 that China stole from Russian SU-35. Russia knows that Chinese are thieves and liars, so they only give very primitive and downgraded avionics to China. J-20 is extremely primitive in avionics when compared to the F-22, and even behind the SU-30MKI. The J-20 radar can be easily jammed by Indian, Russian, and US ECM.

The F-22's avionics and ECM are 2 generations more advanced than the J-20. The J-20 is a Chinese propaganda turkey, and will be easily shot down by F-22s, and even by SU-30MKIs and Rafales, as these aircraft have superior avionics and are already able to track and outsmart the J-20 through superior avionics and ECM technology.

The F-22 has actual stealth through the use of multiple classified tricks, while the J-20 has poor ECM and a trackable radar signature from all angles (including front because of its exposed radar, canopy and resonance hotspots like exposed canard joints, control surface joints, bumps on inlets, etc), which is why Indian Air Force fighters have already been tracking it in Ladakh. Even SU-30MKI can easily defeat J-20 due to superior avionics and ECM (which can jam J-20's primitive radar).

Compared to F-22, Rafale and upgraded SU-30MKI, J-20 is like a 1960s era Mig-21 with poor outdated avionics and will be tracked and shot down quite easily. It's also horribly underpowered (due to use of underpowered Russian engines, since Chinese engines failed) and without a cannon, so even worse than the Mig-21 in these ways. The F-22 and Rafale and upgraded SU-30MKI have far superior avionics and ECM, and will easily destroy the J-20 in air combat.



nationalinterest.org

If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?
A really good question.
nationalinterest.org
nationalinterest.org
If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?

Even as China is publicly showing off its new Chengdu J-20 stealth fighter at the Zhuhai air show for the first time, Beijing is continuing its efforts to acquire advanced Russian fighters.

Indeed, while a pair of J-20s garnered the attention of the world’s media, the Russian government quietly announced that it has started work on building 24 Sukhoi Su-35 Flanker-E fighters for the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF). China signed a contract for the delivery of two-dozen Su-35s in November 2015 worth at least $2 billion.

“Delivery of these aircraft to China will be carried out under the terms defined by the relevant contract,” Vladimir Drozhzhov, deputy director of Russia’s Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation, told the Moscow-based TASS news agency. “We are now carrying out the execution of the first phase of our contractual obligations.”

As such, Russia is expected to deliver four Su-35s to the PLAAF before the end of the year. The remaining Su-35s are expected to be delivered within the next three years. But given the Kremlin’s previous experiences with selling China advanced technology, Moscow has insisted on agreements to secure Russian intellectual property onboard the Su-35. In previous years, the Chinese reverse engineered older versions of the Flanker into the Shenyang J-11, J-15 and J-16 series of aircraft.

“We established a Russian-Chinese working group for the purposes of practical implementation of this agreement, which held a regular meeting in September this year,” Drozhzhov said.

Despite whatever agreement Beijing might have signed with Moscow, the Chinese are almost certainly interested in the Su-35 to harvest its technology. While the current configuration of the J-20 externally resembles a genuine fifth-generation fighter in several respects, China remains woefully lacking in engine and mission systems avionics technology. The Su-35’s Saturn AL-41F1S afterburning turbofans, Tikhomirov NIIP Irbis-E phased array radar and electronic warfare suite are likely of high interest to Beijing.

Indeed, China has not perfected its indigenous WS-10 for its Flanker clones, let alone come close to finishing development of the next-generation WS-15 it would need for the J-20. The WS-15 is currently thought to be in a ground-testing phase with flight trials set to begin on an Ilyushin Il-76 some time in the future.

In fact, China has not demonstrated it can build any reliable jet engine—and that’s including designs that it basically stole from Russia. Indeed, the J-20 currently appears to be powered by twin Russian-built Saturn AL-31F engines found on the Sukhoi Su-27 and its many Chinese knockoffs. The addition of the Russian-built AL-41F1S series engines might provide a solution to Beijing’s engine woes.

There are indications that the J-20 carries an active electronically scanned array radar (AESA). Allegedly, the J-20 would be fitted with a Type 1475 (also referred to as the KLJ-5 radar), which is supposedly being tested on a China Test Flight Establishment owned Tupolev Tu-204. However, there is no way to confirm that information because the PLAAF isn’t all that forthcoming about sharing information concerning its developmental projects. However, Russian radar technology is generally believed to be ahead of China’s and it is certainly possible Beijing could glean valuable technical insights from the Irbis-E.

The one advantage the Chinese have over the Russians is in the realm of electro-optical/infrared targeting systems—where Moscow has lagged behind in the wake of the post-Soviet economic meltdown of the 1990s. Indeed, the J-20 does appear to have an electro-optical targeting system (EOTS) mounted under the nose—which could be the Beijing A-Star Science and Technology EOTS-89. But there is no publicly (and reliable) data available about the performance of that sensor. It is very likely it does not match the performance of American or Israeli systems.

Certainly, the J-20 does represent a leap forward for the Chinese defense-aerospace industry. One day, China will be able to develop and build its own jet engines as well as create world-class mission systems avionics—especially given the investment Beijing continues to make into the defense-aerospace sector. However, that day is not today. If the J-20 was really as capable as some would have you believe, Beijing wouldn’t bother with buying a token fleet of Su-35s—there would simply be no point in doing so.


swarajyamag.com

India’s Rafale Vs China’s J-20: How The Two Fighters Stack Up Against Each Other
Here’s everything you should know.
swarajyamag.com
swarajyamag.com


zeenews.india.com

IAF's Sukhoi Su-30 MKIs can detect and track Chinese Chengdu J-20 stealth fighters
The IAF Sukhoi Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet.
zeenews.india.com
zeenews.india.com
IAF's Sukhoi Su-30 MKIs can detect and track Chinese Chengdu J-20 stealth fighters

The IAF Sukhoi Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet.

Indian Air Force can track and detect the state-of-art Chinese Chengdu J-20 fighters, which is reported to have stealth capabilities. The Sukhoi Su-30MKI radar can see the Chengdu J-20 hundreds of kilometres away, according to the IAF. India is planning to upgrade the Su-30 MKIs with Russian Phazotron Zhuk-AE Active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars which can track 30 targets and engage six of them simultaneously.
According to the Indian Defence Research Wing, the IAF Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet. IAF chief Air Chief Marshal Birender Singh Dhanoa said the "Su-30 radar is good enough and can pick it (J-20) up from many kilometers away". He made the comment a couple of months back when asked if the J-20 which was "invisible to the radar" could be a threat.

The top IAF commander expressed confidence that the IAF was on a strong wicket and the new assets with the force were more than adequate to take on the Chengdu J-20. He added that his force was more than capable of matching the Chinese Air Force as the former has several limitations because their airstrips are located on a very high altitude.
While Chinese defence experts claim the Chengdu J-20 is China's answer to the American fifth-generation stealth fighters like F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II but western experts claim the former is just a fourth-generation medium and long-range fighter with an inferior engine compared to the US stealth fighters.

The Chinese have been building up their infrastructure to allow their fighters to take off from runways in Tibet even though the high altitude means that the jets have several limitations in terms of fuel and weapons payload. India has been countering the Chinese buildup by basing its frontline Su-30 MKIs in the northeast.
Air Chief Marshal Dhanoa had said that IAF's 13-day long wargame Gagan Shakti 2018 had achieved more than its objectives while adding that the mega exercise was not against any country in particular. The IAF finetuned its response and practiced scenarios where nuclear or chemical attacks have been carried out. Gagan Shakti 2018 also saw the IAF move its assets rapidly between the eastern and western sectors.
The 13-day Gagan Shakti 2018 exercises also saw the extensive testing of the newly-inducted homemade HAL Tejas supersonic fighter jet. Check the combat capability of the Tejas and its performance was a key area of focus of the exercises.

The J-20 is more of a psy ops propaganda barbie doll project designed to impress brainwashed Chinese people in order to keep them under control. These mindless Chinese drones believe whatever propaganda the Chinese government feeds them, not knowing that their Chinese Communist Party government are liars, thieves and criminals. Here is proof that Chinese Communist Party government are liars, thieves and criminals, so their claims about J-20 and other Chinese weapons cannot be trusted because these claims are just Chinese Communist Party propaganda designed to keep brainwashed Chinese people under the CCP government control as slaves:

新疆 : 新讲 Xinjiang : a New Explanation
我们的目的是战斗恐惧。现今社会人民总于政府用高科技监控下生活。令人民失去自由。 中国共产党领导称他们爱国,爱人民。其实他们只爱党,只爱权力。 这些视频是在中国拍的。 这是中国政府长期在新疆维吾尔自治区压制人权与基本自由。 Our aim is to fight fear. The people of today's society always live under the supervision of the government with high technology. People lose their freedom. The leaders of the Communist Party of China called them patriotic and loved the people. In fact, they only love the party and only love power. These videos were taken in China. This is the long-term suppression of human rights and fundamental freedoms by the Chinese government in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.
 

xizhimen

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Stealth is not just about having an internal weapons bay. The radar/radome, canopy, IRST on the J-20 are all big reflectors of radar from the front. Which is why the J-20 is NOT STEALTHY, and has been repeatedly tracked by SU-30MKI radar in Ladakh. The canards, joints and gaps in between are big radar resonance hotspots from the front. This is one of the reasons the US chose not to go with canards in F-22. The Chinese chose the canards because it didn't make any difference since they simply don't have the technology to make a true stealth fighter. The Chinese don't have the technology to reduce the RCS contribution from the radar/radome in the front, which is one of the radar hotspots in any fighter, including J-20. The F-22 is a true stealth fighter with a RCS in X band of less than 0.0001 sq meters. At best, the J-20 is a reduced RCS fighter even from the front, and NOWHERE in the ballpark of F-22 level of stealth. This, combined with vastly inferior avionics that are stolen from downgraded 1990s Russian fighters (SU-35) that China recently imported, means that the F-22 and the F-35 will completely destroy the J-20 in any conflict.

The J-20 is not stealthy; it can be easily tracked by modern radars from all angles, and has been repeatedly tracked by Indian Air Force in Ladakh. This is because China still has no way to hide radar reflection from its radar/radome and canopy in the front, and from multiple resonance hotspots such as canard joints and other control surfaces. The radar reflections from the sides and back are even worse.

The Chinese material technology is so far behind that the canopy, IRST, canards and canard joints, control surfaces, inlet features and other resonance hotspots also increase the RCS of the J-20 to a point where it can easily be tracked by modern radars. Chinese ECM is also very primitive, and is stolen from SU-35 it imported from Russia very recently. Luckily the Russians know that Chinese are thieves and liars, so they only gave very primitive technology on the SU-35.

The avionics on the J-20 are very primitive, as they are stolen from the SU-35s that China recently imported from Russia. If China did not need to steal SU-35 avionics, why would China order the SU-35 so recently, with a small order of only 24 aircraft? Russia only gave a very downgraded version of its 1990s radar and other avionics on the SU-35 sold to China. F-22's radar, ECM and other avionics are 2 generations ahead of the avionics on the J-20 that China stole from Russian SU-35. Russia knows that Chinese are thieves and liars, so they only give very primitive and downgraded avionics to China. J-20 is extremely primitive in avionics when compared to the F-22, and even behind the SU-30MKI. The J-20 radar can be easily jammed by Indian, Russian, and US ECM.

The F-22's avionics and ECM are 2 generations more advanced than the J-20. The J-20 is a Chinese propaganda turkey, and will be easily shot down by F-22s, and even by SU-30MKIs and Rafales, as these aircraft have superior avionics and are already able to track and outsmart the J-20 through superior avionics and ECM technology.

The F-22 has actual stealth through the use of multiple classified tricks, while the J-20 has poor ECM and a trackable radar signature from all angles (including front because of its exposed radar, canopy and resonance hotspots like exposed canard joints, control surface joints, bumps on inlets, etc), which is why Indian Air Force fighters have already been tracking it in Ladakh. Even SU-30MKI can easily defeat J-20 due to superior avionics and ECM (which can jam J-20's primitive radar).

Compared to F-22, Rafale and upgraded SU-30MKI, J-20 is like a 1960s era Mig-21 with poor outdated avionics and will be tracked and shot down quite easily. It's also horribly underpowered (due to use of underpowered Russian engines, since Chinese engines failed) and without a cannon, so even worse than the Mig-21 in these ways. The F-22 and Rafale and upgraded SU-30MKI have far superior avionics and ECM, and will easily destroy the J-20 in air combat.



nationalinterest.org

If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?
A really good question.
nationalinterest.org
nationalinterest.org
If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?

Even as China is publicly showing off its new Chengdu J-20 stealth fighter at the Zhuhai air show for the first time, Beijing is continuing its efforts to acquire advanced Russian fighters.

Indeed, while a pair of J-20s garnered the attention of the world’s media, the Russian government quietly announced that it has started work on building 24 Sukhoi Su-35 Flanker-E fighters for the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF). China signed a contract for the delivery of two-dozen Su-35s in November 2015 worth at least $2 billion.

“Delivery of these aircraft to China will be carried out under the terms defined by the relevant contract,” Vladimir Drozhzhov, deputy director of Russia’s Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation, told the Moscow-based TASS news agency. “We are now carrying out the execution of the first phase of our contractual obligations.”

As such, Russia is expected to deliver four Su-35s to the PLAAF before the end of the year. The remaining Su-35s are expected to be delivered within the next three years. But given the Kremlin’s previous experiences with selling China advanced technology, Moscow has insisted on agreements to secure Russian intellectual property onboard the Su-35. In previous years, the Chinese reverse engineered older versions of the Flanker into the Shenyang J-11, J-15 and J-16 series of aircraft.

“We established a Russian-Chinese working group for the purposes of practical implementation of this agreement, which held a regular meeting in September this year,” Drozhzhov said.

Despite whatever agreement Beijing might have signed with Moscow, the Chinese are almost certainly interested in the Su-35 to harvest its technology. While the current configuration of the J-20 externally resembles a genuine fifth-generation fighter in several respects, China remains woefully lacking in engine and mission systems avionics technology. The Su-35’s Saturn AL-41F1S afterburning turbofans, Tikhomirov NIIP Irbis-E phased array radar and electronic warfare suite are likely of high interest to Beijing.

Indeed, China has not perfected its indigenous WS-10 for its Flanker clones, let alone come close to finishing development of the next-generation WS-15 it would need for the J-20. The WS-15 is currently thought to be in a ground-testing phase with flight trials set to begin on an Ilyushin Il-76 some time in the future.

In fact, China has not demonstrated it can build any reliable jet engine—and that’s including designs that it basically stole from Russia. Indeed, the J-20 currently appears to be powered by twin Russian-built Saturn AL-31F engines found on the Sukhoi Su-27 and its many Chinese knockoffs. The addition of the Russian-built AL-41F1S series engines might provide a solution to Beijing’s engine woes.

There are indications that the J-20 carries an active electronically scanned array radar (AESA). Allegedly, the J-20 would be fitted with a Type 1475 (also referred to as the KLJ-5 radar), which is supposedly being tested on a China Test Flight Establishment owned Tupolev Tu-204. However, there is no way to confirm that information because the PLAAF isn’t all that forthcoming about sharing information concerning its developmental projects. However, Russian radar technology is generally believed to be ahead of China’s and it is certainly possible Beijing could glean valuable technical insights from the Irbis-E.

The one advantage the Chinese have over the Russians is in the realm of electro-optical/infrared targeting systems—where Moscow has lagged behind in the wake of the post-Soviet economic meltdown of the 1990s. Indeed, the J-20 does appear to have an electro-optical targeting system (EOTS) mounted under the nose—which could be the Beijing A-Star Science and Technology EOTS-89. But there is no publicly (and reliable) data available about the performance of that sensor. It is very likely it does not match the performance of American or Israeli systems.

Certainly, the J-20 does represent a leap forward for the Chinese defense-aerospace industry. One day, China will be able to develop and build its own jet engines as well as create world-class mission systems avionics—especially given the investment Beijing continues to make into the defense-aerospace sector. However, that day is not today. If the J-20 was really as capable as some would have you believe, Beijing wouldn’t bother with buying a token fleet of Su-35s—there would simply be no point in doing so.


swarajyamag.com

India’s Rafale Vs China’s J-20: How The Two Fighters Stack Up Against Each Other
Here’s everything you should know.
swarajyamag.com
swarajyamag.com


zeenews.india.com

IAF's Sukhoi Su-30 MKIs can detect and track Chinese Chengdu J-20 stealth fighters
The IAF Sukhoi Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet.
zeenews.india.com
zeenews.india.com
IAF's Sukhoi Su-30 MKIs can detect and track Chinese Chengdu J-20 stealth fighters

The IAF Sukhoi Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet.

Indian Air Force can track and detect the state-of-art Chinese Chengdu J-20 fighters, which is reported to have stealth capabilities. The Sukhoi Su-30MKI radar can see the Chengdu J-20 hundreds of kilometres away, according to the IAF. India is planning to upgrade the Su-30 MKIs with Russian Phazotron Zhuk-AE Active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars which can track 30 targets and engage six of them simultaneously.
According to the Indian Defence Research Wing, the IAF Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet. IAF chief Air Chief Marshal Birender Singh Dhanoa said the "Su-30 radar is good enough and can pick it (J-20) up from many kilometers away". He made the comment a couple of months back when asked if the J-20 which was "invisible to the radar" could be a threat.

The top IAF commander expressed confidence that the IAF was on a strong wicket and the new assets with the force were more than adequate to take on the Chengdu J-20. He added that his force was more than capable of matching the Chinese Air Force as the former has several limitations because their airstrips are located on a very high altitude.
While Chinese defence experts claim the Chengdu J-20 is China's answer to the American fifth-generation stealth fighters like F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II but western experts claim the former is just a fourth-generation medium and long-range fighter with an inferior engine compared to the US stealth fighters.

The Chinese have been building up their infrastructure to allow their fighters to take off from runways in Tibet even though the high altitude means that the jets have several limitations in terms of fuel and weapons payload. India has been countering the Chinese buildup by basing its frontline Su-30 MKIs in the northeast.
Air Chief Marshal Dhanoa had said that IAF's 13-day long wargame Gagan Shakti 2018 had achieved more than its objectives while adding that the mega exercise was not against any country in particular. The IAF finetuned its response and practiced scenarios where nuclear or chemical attacks have been carried out. Gagan Shakti 2018 also saw the IAF move its assets rapidly between the eastern and western sectors.
The 13-day Gagan Shakti 2018 exercises also saw the extensive testing of the newly-inducted homemade HAL Tejas supersonic fighter jet. Check the combat capability of the Tejas and its performance was a key area of focus of the exercises.

The J-20 is more of a psy ops propaganda barbie doll project designed to impress brainwashed Chinese people in order to keep them under control. These mindless Chinese drones believe whatever propaganda the Chinese government feeds them, not knowing that their Chinese Communist Party government are liars, thieves and criminals. Here is proof that Chinese Communist Party government are liars, thieves and criminals, so their claims about J-20 and other Chinese weapons cannot be trusted because these claims are just Chinese Communist Party propaganda designed to keep brainwashed Chinese people under the CCP government control as slaves:

There are various reports claiming stealth fighters can be easily tracked, how true of them is still unknown, but there is indeed a chance that all stealth jets are being hyped.

China: We Can Track the F-22 Raptor and Stealth F-35
 

johnq

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There are various reports claiming stealth fighters can be easily tracked, how true of them is still unknown, but there is indeed a chance that all stealth jets are being hyped.

China: We Can Track the F-22 Raptor and Stealth F-35
US claims on F-22 and F-35 are a lot more credible because it is a democracy. Chinese Communist government and PLA are criminals that operate concentration camps and enslave people with forced labor, so their claims are NOT TRUSTWORTHY at all. This is why the SU-30MKI has been able to track operational J-20s in Ladakh from hundreds of KMs. The avionics on the J-20 are also stolen from severely downgraded Russian avionics from 1990s Russian tech on SU-35 recently imported from Russia. If China were really so advanced as it claims, it would have no need to import Russian SU-35 as it has done so recently. The fact is that even the severely downgraded 1990s avionics technology on the SU-35 is a big step up for China; stealing avionics technology is the ONLY reason to buy such a small number (24) of SU-35s from Russia so recently. The fact that China is stealing such outdated technology from Russia means that it is nowhere in the same ballpark as even the Rafale or SU-30MKI, forget about the highly classified latest generation F-22 and F-35. US military loves Chinese propaganda, because it can use it to get more money out of US Congress. The reality is that PLA is technologically extremely primitive compared to the US.

From J-20 thread:

I am amazed at how ignorant some posters are about stealth and resonance physics. Stealth is not just about having an internal weapons bay and shape of aircraft. The radar/radome, canopy, IRST on the J-20 are all big reflectors of radar from the front. Which is why the J-20 is NOT STEALTHY, and has been repeatedly tracked by SU-30MKI radar in Ladakh. The canards, joints and gaps in between are big radar resonance hotspots from the front.

The J-20 is not stealthy; it can be easily tracked by modern radars from all angles, and has been repeatedly tracked by Indian Air Force in Ladakh. This is because China still has no way to hide radar reflection from its radar/radome and canopy in the front, and from multiple resonance hotspots such as canard joints and other control surfaces. The radar reflections from the sides and back are even worse.

Rafale is stealthy because it uses a combination of low RCS and ECM to reduce its radar footprint. That means that the effective radar footprint of Rafale (with ECM)
is far less than the J-20, whose radar/radome (big contributor to radar signature) is exposed from the front increasing the RCS significantly. The Chinese material technology is so far behind that the canopy, IRST, canards and canard joints, control surfaces, inlet features and other resonance hotspots also increase the RCS of the J-20 to a point where it can easily be tracked by modern radars. Chinese ECM is also very primitive, and is stolen from SU-35 it imported from Russia very recently. Luckily the Russians know that Chinese are thieves and liars, so they only gave very primitive technology on the SU-35.

The avionics on the J-20 are very primitive, as they are stolen from the SU-35s that China recently imported from Russia. If China did not need to steal SU-35 avionics, why would China order the SU-35 so recently, with a small order of only 24 aircraft? Russia only gave a very downgraded version of its 1990s radar and other avionics on the SU-35 sold to China. Rafale's radar, ECM and other avionics are 2 generations ahead of the avionics on the J-20 that China stole from Russian SU-35. Russia knows that Chinese are thieves and liars, so they only give very primitive and downgraded avionics to China. J-20 is extremely primitive in avionics when compared to the Rafale, and even behind the SU-30MKI. The J-20 radar can be easily jammed by Indian, Russian, and western ECM.

The Rafale's avionics and ECM are 2 generations more advanced than the J-20. The J-20 is a Chinese propaganda turkey, and will be easily shot down by Indian SU-30MKIs and Rafales, as both these aircraft have superior avionics and are already able to track and outsmart the J-20 through superior avionics and ECM technology.
The Rafale has actual stealth through the use of ECM, while the J-20 has poor ECM and a trackable radar signature from all angles (including front because of its exposed radar, canopy and resonance hotspots like exposed canard joints, control surface joints, bumps on inlets, etc), which is why Indian Air Force fighters have already been tracking it in Ladakh. Even SU-30MKI can easily defeat J-20 due to superior avionics and ECM (which can jam J-20's primitive radar).

Compared to Rafale and upgraded SU-30MKI, J-20 is like a 1960s era Mig-21 with poor outdated avionics and will be tracked and shot down quite easily. It's also horribly underpowered (due to use of Russian engines, since Chinese engines failed) and without a cannon, so even worse than the Mig-21 in these ways. The Rafale and SU-30MKI have far superior avionics and ECM, and will easily destroy the J-20 in air combat.



nationalinterest.org

If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?
A really good question.
nationalinterest.org
nationalinterest.org
If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?

Even as China is publicly showing off its new Chengdu J-20 stealth fighter at the Zhuhai air show for the first time, Beijing is continuing its efforts to acquire advanced Russian fighters.

Indeed, while a pair of J-20s garnered the attention of the world’s media, the Russian government quietly announced that it has started work on building 24 Sukhoi Su-35 Flanker-E fighters for the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF). China signed a contract for the delivery of two-dozen Su-35s in November 2015 worth at least $2 billion.

“Delivery of these aircraft to China will be carried out under the terms defined by the relevant contract,” Vladimir Drozhzhov, deputy director of Russia’s Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation, told the Moscow-based TASS news agency. “We are now carrying out the execution of the first phase of our contractual obligations.”

As such, Russia is expected to deliver four Su-35s to the PLAAF before the end of the year. The remaining Su-35s are expected to be delivered within the next three years. But given the Kremlin’s previous experiences with selling China advanced technology, Moscow has insisted on agreements to secure Russian intellectual property onboard the Su-35. In previous years, the Chinese reverse engineered older versions of the Flanker into the Shenyang J-11, J-15 and J-16 series of aircraft.

“We established a Russian-Chinese working group for the purposes of practical implementation of this agreement, which held a regular meeting in September this year,” Drozhzhov said.

Despite whatever agreement Beijing might have signed with Moscow, the Chinese are almost certainly interested in the Su-35 to harvest its technology. While the current configuration of the J-20 externally resembles a genuine fifth-generation fighter in several respects, China remains woefully lacking in engine and mission systems avionics technology. The Su-35’s Saturn AL-41F1S afterburning turbofans, Tikhomirov NIIP Irbis-E phased array radar and electronic warfare suite are likely of high interest to Beijing.

Indeed, China has not perfected its indigenous WS-10 for its Flanker clones, let alone come close to finishing development of the next-generation WS-15 it would need for the J-20. The WS-15 is currently thought to be in a ground-testing phase with flight trials set to begin on an Ilyushin Il-76 some time in the future.

In fact, China has not demonstrated it can build any reliable jet engine—and that’s including designs that it basically stole from Russia. Indeed, the J-20 currently appears to be powered by twin Russian-built Saturn AL-31F engines found on the Sukhoi Su-27 and its many Chinese knockoffs. The addition of the Russian-built AL-41F1S series engines might provide a solution to Beijing’s engine woes.

There are indications that the J-20 carries an active electronically scanned array radar (AESA). Allegedly, the J-20 would be fitted with a Type 1475 (also referred to as the KLJ-5 radar), which is supposedly being tested on a China Test Flight Establishment owned Tupolev Tu-204. However, there is no way to confirm that information because the PLAAF isn’t all that forthcoming about sharing information concerning its developmental projects. However, Russian radar technology is generally believed to be ahead of China’s and it is certainly possible Beijing could glean valuable technical insights from the Irbis-E.

The one advantage the Chinese have over the Russians is in the realm of electro-optical/infrared targeting systems—where Moscow has lagged behind in the wake of the post-Soviet economic meltdown of the 1990s. Indeed, the J-20 does appear to have an electro-optical targeting system (EOTS) mounted under the nose—which could be the Beijing A-Star Science and Technology EOTS-89. But there is no publicly (and reliable) data available about the performance of that sensor. It is very likely it does not match the performance of American or Israeli systems.

Certainly, the J-20 does represent a leap forward for the Chinese defense-aerospace industry. One day, China will be able to develop and build its own jet engines as well as create world-class mission systems avionics—especially given the investment Beijing continues to make into the defense-aerospace sector. However, that day is not today. If the J-20 was really as capable as some would have you believe, Beijing wouldn’t bother with buying a token fleet of Su-35s—there would simply be no point in doing so.


swarajyamag.com

India’s Rafale Vs China’s J-20: How The Two Fighters Stack Up Against Each Other
Here’s everything you should know.
swarajyamag.com
swarajyamag.com


zeenews.india.com

IAF's Sukhoi Su-30 MKIs can detect and track Chinese Chengdu J-20 stealth fighters
The IAF Sukhoi Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet.
zeenews.india.com
zeenews.india.com
IAF's Sukhoi Su-30 MKIs can detect and track Chinese Chengdu J-20 stealth fighters

The IAF Sukhoi Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet.

Indian Air Force can track and detect the state-of-art Chinese Chengdu J-20 fighters, which is reported to have stealth capabilities. The Sukhoi Su-30MKI radar can see the Chengdu J-20 hundreds of kilometres away, according to the IAF. India is planning to upgrade the Su-30 MKIs with Russian Phazotron Zhuk-AE Active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars which can track 30 targets and engage six of them simultaneously.
According to the Indian Defence Research Wing, the IAF Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet. IAF chief Air Chief Marshal Birender Singh Dhanoa said the "Su-30 radar is good enough and can pick it (J-20) up from many kilometers away". He made the comment a couple of months back when asked if the J-20 which was "invisible to the radar" could be a threat.

The top IAF commander expressed confidence that the IAF was on a strong wicket and the new assets with the force were more than adequate to take on the Chengdu J-20. He added that his force was more than capable of matching the Chinese Air Force as the former has several limitations because their airstrips are located on a very high altitude.
While Chinese defence experts claim the Chengdu J-20 is China's answer to the American fifth-generation stealth fighters like F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II but western experts claim the former is just a fourth-generation medium and long-range fighter with an inferior engine compared to the US stealth fighters.

The Chinese have been building up their infrastructure to allow their fighters to take off from runways in Tibet even though the high altitude means that the jets have several limitations in terms of fuel and weapons payload. India has been countering the Chinese buildup by basing its frontline Su-30 MKIs in the northeast.
Air Chief Marshal Dhanoa had said that IAF's 13-day long wargame Gagan Shakti 2018 had achieved more than its objectives while adding that the mega exercise was not against any country in particular. The IAF finetuned its response and practiced scenarios where nuclear or chemical attacks have been carried out. Gagan Shakti 2018 also saw the IAF move its assets rapidly between the eastern and western sectors.
The 13-day Gagan Shakti 2018 exercises also saw the extensive testing of the newly-inducted homemade HAL Tejas supersonic fighter jet. Check the combat capability of the Tejas and its performance was a key area of focus of the exercises.

The J-20 is more of a psy ops propaganda barbie doll project designed to impress brainwashed Chinese people in order to keep them under control. These mindless Chinese drones believe whatever propaganda the Chinese government feeds them, not knowing that their Chinese Communist Party government are liars, thieves and criminals. Here is more proof that Chinese Communist Party government are liars, thieves and criminals, so their claims about J-20 and other Chinese weapons cannot be trusted because these claims are just Chinese Communist Party propaganda designed to keep brainwashed Chinese people under the CCP government control as slaves:

What’s happening in Xinjiang is genocide

WHAT HAS been known until now about China’s persecution of the Uighurs and other Muslims in Xinjiang province has focused on cultural genocide: concentration camps intended to eradicate their language, traditions and ways of life. This was cruel enough. But new evidence has surfaced that China has also imposed on the Uighurs a form of demographic genocide with forced sterilizations and other measures aimed at reducing the population.

The disclosure comes in an investigative report from the Associated Press and a new research report by scholar Adrian Zenz for the Jamestown Foundation. The new evidence shows that China is systematically using pregnancy checks, forced intrauterine devices, sterilization and even abortion to reduce the population of Uighurs and other Muslims in Xinjiang. Moreover, having too many children is being punished by incarceration in the camps. According to a set of leaked data, obtained and corroborated by the AP, of 484 camp detainees listed in Karakax county in Xinjiang, 149 were there for having too many children, the most common reason for holding them. Detention in camps — which the government claims is vocational education — is written policy in at least three counties for parents with too many children.
The AP reported that authorities have gone hunting for such parents, ripping them away from their families unless they can pay huge fines.

Mr. Zenz found that the Xinjiang authorities planned in 2019 to subject at least 80 percent of women of childbearing age in four rural southern prefectures to intrusive birth prevention surgeries, intrauterine devices or sterilizations. Moreover, in 2018, 80 percent of all new IUD placements in China were performed in Xinjiang — despite the fact that the region makes up only 1.8 percent of the nation’s population.
The campaign to depress the Uighur population appears to be working. Birthrates in the mostly Uighur regions of Hotan and Kashgar plunged by more than 60 percent from 2015 to 2018, the latest year available in government statistics. Across the Xinjiang region, birthrates continue to plummet, falling nearly 24 percent last year alone, compared with just 4.2 percent nationwide.
China long employed coercion in family life with its one-child policy, now abandoned. In Xinjiang, it has sought to whitewash the horrors it is inflicting on people. The new disclosures make it even more urgent that China’s leaders be pressed to account for these atrocities. The measures fall within the definition of genocide in the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, which includes “imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group.” China is a signatory but rejects the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court.

President Trump has just signed a new sanctions law against individuals who are found responsible for abuses in Xinjiang. But China’s treatment of the Uighurs is so reprehensible that it calls into serious question whether China should be permitted to proceed as host of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics. Why should the world sports community honor a country that has committed genocide?

🔴 Exiled Chinese Billionaire's Accusations of China (w/ Guo Wengui & Kyle Bass) | RV Classics

Kyle Bass sits down with infamous Chinese businessman Guo Wengui, also known as known as “Miles Kwok,” to hear a series of shocking accusations and predictions revolving around the Chinese government. Kwok provides his perception of the backstory behind several recent high-profile news items, and touches on the Chinese government’s management of the economy. He also unfurls an alarming forecast about Alibaba co-founder Jack Ma. Filmed on October 5, 2018 at an undisclosed location.
 

ArgonPrime

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@johnq Not be the fly in your ointment but have you weighed in the possibility that those J-20s that had been supposedly tracked by IAF MKIs had been flying with their Luneberg lenses on?? Just a thought.
 

xizhimen

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If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?

China bought a limited number of Su-35 for research purposes, China likes to get her hands on every foregin weapon if possible to see if anything can be adopted to improve China's own counterparts.
 

johnq

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@johnq Not be the fly in your ointment but have you weighed in the possibility that those J-20s that had been supposedly tracked by IAF MKIs had been flying with their Luneberg lenses on?? Just a thought.
No, it's Chinese propaganda that was created after the fact. These are operational aircraft being tracked in Tibet and currently in Aksai Hind. Also, China does not have a way to stop its radar/radome, canopy and other resonance hotspots from being painted by radar as of yet, due to technological limitations. This is the real reason why they kept the canards on the J-20 despite them being radar resonance hotspots (around joints, gaps etc) and adversely affecting the RCS. Think of the J-20 as having a somewhat reduced RCS (not stealthy, more like 1 sq meter from front), but with vastly inferior avionics compared to modern aircraft like Rafale and even SU-3MKI due to all the technology restrictions placed on China. What that means is that Indian fighters like (recently upgraded) SU-30MKI and Rafale with long range radars will have no issues tracking it and shooting it down. The ECM on Chinese aircraft is woefully outdated. Indian ECM and radar technology is more modern.
 

xizhimen

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No, it's Chinese propaganda that was created after the fact. These are operational aircraft being tracked in Tibet and currently in Aksai Hind. Also, China does not have a way to stop its radar/radome, canopy and other resonance hotspots from being painted by radar as of yet, due to technological limitations. This is the real reason why they kept the canards on the J-20 despite them being radar resonance hotspots (around joints, gaps etc) and adversely affecting the RCS. Think of the J-20 as having a somewhat reduced RCS (not stealthy, more like 1 sq meter from front), but with vastly inferior avionics compared to modern aircraft like Rafale and even SU-3MKI due to all the technology restrictions placed on China. What that means is that Indian fighters like (recently upgraded) SU-30MKI and Rafale with long range radars will have no issues tracking it and shooting it down.
We'll see, there are so many contradictory reports on those jets coming from various sources of different countries.
 

johnq

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If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?

China bought a limited number of Su-35 for research purposes, China likes to get her hands on every foregin weapon if possible to see if anything can be adopted to improve China's own counterparts.
That is nonsensical Chinese propaganda. China knows Russia always supplies severely downgraded versions of all avionics to it, so that would be pointless. Chinese government claims cannot be trusted as it and the PLA are war criminals who operate concentration camps with forced labor.

From J-20 thread:

The J-20 is not stealthy; it can be easily tracked by modern radars from all angles, and has been repeatedly tracked by Indian Air Force in Ladakh. This is because China still has no way to hide radar reflection from its radar/radome and canopy in the front, and from multiple resonance hotspots such as canard joints and other control surfaces. The radar reflections from the sides and back are even worse.

Rafale is stealthy because it uses a combination of low RCS and ECM to reduce its radar footprint. That means that the effective radar footprint of Rafale (with ECM)
is far less than the J-20, whose radar/radome (big contributor to radar signature) is exposed from the front increasing the RCS significantly. The Chinese material technology is so far behind that the canopy, IRST, canards and canard joints, control surfaces, inlet features and other resonance hotspots also increase the RCS of the J-20 to a point where it can easily be tracked by modern radars. Chinese ECM is also very primitive, and is stolen from SU-35 it imported from Russia very recently. Luckily the Russians know that Chinese are thieves and liars, so they only gave very primitive technology on the SU-35.

The avionics on the J-20 are very primitive, as they are stolen from the SU-35s that China recently imported from Russia. If China did not need to copy SU-35 avionics, why would China order the SU-35 so recently, with a small order of only 24 aircraft? Russia only gave a very downgraded version of its 1990s radar and other avionics on the SU-35 sold to China. Rafale's radar, ECM and other avionics are 2 generations ahead of the avionics on the J-20 that China stole from Russian SU-35. Russia knows that Chinese are thieves and liars, so they only give very primitive and downgraded avionics to China. J-20 is extremely primitive in avionics when compared to the Rafale, and even behind the SU-30MKI. The J-20 radar can be easily jammed by Indian, Russian, and western ECM.

The Rafale's avionics and ECM are 2 generations more advanced than the J-20. The J-20 is a Chinese propaganda turkey, and will be easily shot down by Indian SU-30MKIs and Rafales, as both these aircraft have superior avionics and are already able to track and outsmart the J-20 through superior avionics and ECM technology.
The Rafale has actual stealth through the use of ECM, while the J-20 has poor ECM and a trackable radar signature from all angles (including front because of its exposed radar, canopy and resonance hotspots like exposed canard joints, control surface joints, bumps on inlets, etc), which is why Indian Air Force fighters have already been tracking it in Ladakh. Even SU-30MKI can easily defeat J-20 due to superior avionics and ECM (which can jam J-20's primitive radar).

Compared to Rafale and upgraded SU-30MKI, J-20 is like a 1960s era Mig-21 with poor outdated avionics and will be tracked and shot down quite easily. It's also horribly underpowered (due to use of Russian engines, since Chinese engines failed) and without a cannon, so even worse than the MIg-21 in these ways. The Rafale and SU-30MKI have far superior avionics and ECM, and will easily destroy the J-20 in air combat.

The J-20 is more of a psy ops propaganda barbie doll project designed to impress brainwashed Chinese people in order to keep them under control. These mindless Chinese drones believe whatever propaganda the Chinese government feeds them, not knowing that their Chinese Communist Party government are liars, thieves and criminals. Here is more proof that Chinese Communist Party government are liars, thieves and criminals, so their claims about J-20 and other Chinese weapons cannot be trusted because these claims are just Chinese Communist Party propaganda designed to keep brainwashed Chinese people under the CCP government control as slaves:


🔴 Exiled Chinese Billionaire's Accusations of China (w/ Guo Wengui & Kyle Bass) | RV Classics

Kyle Bass sits down with infamous Chinese businessman Guo Wengui, also known as known as “Miles Kwok,” to hear a series of shocking accusations and predictions revolving around the Chinese government. Kwok provides his perception of the backstory behind several recent high-profile news items, and touches on the Chinese government’s management of the economy. He also unfurls an alarming forecast about Alibaba co-founder Jack Ma. Filmed on October 5, 2018 at an undisclosed location.

#86 China's "5-Fingers" Approach to Strangling India | Cleo Paskal
The India China border dispute continues to spiral out of out control as clashes between both sides turn deadly. But it's part of a much bigger strategy by China, part of what's called Comprehensive National Power, to strangle India, by gaining influence in countries surrounding India, like Nepal and Pakistan, as well as disputed border territories along the Line of Actual Control like Ladakh, the Galwan Valley, and the Arunachal Pradesh. Joining us on this China Unscripted podcast is Cleo Paskal is an Associate Fellow in both the Asia-Pacific program and the Energy, Environment and Resources department at Chatham House, as well as a Non-Resident Senior Fellow for the Indo-Pacific in the Center on Military and Political Power at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Built To Last A BuzzFeed News investigation based on thousands of satellite images reveals a vast, growing infrastructure for long-term detention and incarceration.

China has secretly built scores of massive new prison and internment camps in the past three years, dramatically escalating its campaign against Muslim minorities even as it publicly claimed the detainees had all been set free. The construction of these purpose-built, high-security camps — some capable of housing tens of thousands of people — signals a radical shift away from the country’s previous makeshift use of public buildings, like schools and retirement homes, to a vast and permanent infrastructure for mass detention.
In the most extensive investigation of China’s internment camp system ever done using publicly available satellite images, coupled with dozens of interviews with former detainees, BuzzFeed News identified more than 260 structures built since 2017 and bearing the hallmarks of fortified detention compounds. There is at least one in nearly every county in the far-west region of Xinjiang. During that time, the investigation shows, China has established a sprawling system to detain and incarcerate hundreds of thousands of Uighurs, Kazakhs, and other Muslim minorities, in what is already the largest-scale detention of ethnic and religious minorities since World War II.
These forbidding facilities — including several built or significantly expanded within the last year — are part of the government’s unprecedented campaign of mass detention of more than a million people, which began in late 2016. That year Chen Quanguo, the region’s top official and Communist Party boss, whom the US recently sanctioned over human rights abuses, also put Muslim minorities — more than half the region’s population of about 25 million — under perpetual surveillance via facial recognition cameras, cellphone tracking, checkpoints, and heavy-handed human policing. They are also subject to many other abuses, ranging from sterilization to forced labor.
To detain thousands of people in short order, the government repurposed old schools and other buildings. Then, as the number of detainees swelled, in 2018 the government began building new facilities with far greater security measures and more permanent architectural features, such as heavy concrete walls and guard towers, the BuzzFeed News analysis shows. Prisons often take years to build, but some of these new compounds took less than six months, according to historical satellite data. The government has also added more factories within camp and prison compounds during that time, suggesting the expansion of forced labor within the region. Construction was still ongoing as of this month.
“People are living in horror in these places,” said 49-year-old Zhenishan Berdibek, who was detained in a camp in the Tacheng region for much of 2018. “Some of the younger people were not as tolerant as us — they cried and screamed and shouted.” But Berdibek, a cancer survivor, couldn’t muster the energy. As she watched the younger women get dragged away to solitary confinement, “I lost my hope,” she said. “I wanted to die inside the camp.”
BuzzFeed News identified 268 newly built compounds by cross-referencing blanked-out areas on Baidu Maps — a Google Maps–like tool that’s widely used in China — with images from external satellite data providers. These compounds often contained multiple detention facilities.

This map shows the locations of facilities bearing the hallmarks of prisons and internment camps found in this investigation. Note: Many satellite images in this map are from before 2017, meaning that although you can zoom in, you won’t always be able to see the evidence of possible camps.

Locations identified or corroborated by other sources. Satellite images — perimeter walls and guard towers. Satellite images — walls and barbed wire but no guard towers. Detention Center built before 2017. Likely used for detention in the past but now closed or reduced security.
BuzzFeed News; Source: Analysis of satellite imagery using Google Earth, Planet Labs, and the European Space Agency's Sentinel Hub

Ninety-two of these facilities have been identified or verified as detention centers by other sources, such as government procurement documents, academic research, or, in 19 cases, visits by journalists.
Another 176 facilities have been established by satellite imagery alone. The images frequently show thick walls at the perimeter, and often, barbed wire fencing that creates pens and corridors in the courtyards. Many compounds in the region are walled, but the facilities identified by BuzzFeed News have much heavier fortifications. At 121 of these compounds, they also show guard towers, often built into the perimeter wall.
In response to a detailed list of questions about this article as well as a list of GPS coordinates of facilities identified in this article, the Chinese Consulate in New York said “the issue concerning Xinjiang is by no means about human rights, religion or ethnicity, but about combating violent terrorism and separatism,” adding that it was a “groundless lie” that a million Uighurs have been detained in the region.

“Xinjiang has set up vocational education and training centers in order to root out extreme thoughts, enhance the rule of law awareness through education, improve vocational skills and create employment opportunities for them, so that those affected by extreme and violent ideas can return to society as soon as possible,” the consulate added, saying human rights are protected in the centers and that “trainees have freedom of movement.” But it also compared its program to “compulsory programs for terrorist criminals” it said are taking place in other countries including the US and UK.
China's Foreign Ministry and Baidu did not respond to repeated requests for comment.
The new facilities are scattered across every populated area of the region, and several are large enough to accommodate 10,000 prisoners at a minimum, based on their size and architectural features. (One of the reporters on this story is a licensed architect.)
Unlike early sites, the new facilities appear more permanent and prisonlike, similar in construction to high-security prisons in other parts of China. The most highly fortified compounds offer little space between buildings, tiny concrete-walled yards, heavy masonry construction, and long networks of corridors with cells down either side. Their layouts are cavernous, allowing little natural light to the interior of the buildings. BuzzFeed News could see how rooms were laid out at some high-security facilities by examining historical satellite photos taken as they were being constructed, including photos of buildings without roofs.
With at least tens of thousands of detainees crowded into government buildings repurposed as camps by the end of 2017, the government began building the largest new facilities in the spring of 2018. Several were complete by October 2018, with further facilities built through 2019 and construction of a handful more continuing even now.
The government has said its camps are schools and vocational training centers where detainees are “deradicalized.” The government’s own internal documentation about its policies in Xinjiang has used the term “concentration,” or 集中, to describe “educational schools.”
The government claims that its campaign combats extremism in the region. But most who end up in these facilities are not extremists of any sort.
Downloading WhatsApp, which is banned in China, maintaining ties with family abroad, engaging in prayer, and visiting a foreign website are all offenses for which Muslims have been sent to camps, according to previously leaked documents and interviews with former detainees. Because the government does not consider internment camps to be part of the criminal justice system and none of these behaviors are crimes under Chinese law, no detainees have been formally arrested or charged with a crime, let alone seen a day in court.
The compounds BuzzFeed News identified likely include extrajudicial internment camps — which hold people who are not suspected of any crime — as well as prisons. Both types of facilities have security features that closely resemble each other. Xinjiang’s prison population has grown massively during the government’s campaign: In 2017, the region had 21% of all arrests in China, despite making up less than 2% of the national population — an eightfold increase from the year before, according to a New York Times analysis of government data. Because China’s Communist Party–controlled courts have a more than 99% conviction rate, the overwhelming majority of those arrests likely resulted in convictions.

“One day I saw a pregnant woman in shackles. Another woman had a baby in her arms, she was breastfeeding.”

People detained in the camps told BuzzFeed News they were subjected to torture, hunger, overcrowding, solitary confinement, forced birth control, and a range of other abuses. They said they were put through brainwashing programs focusing on Communist Party propaganda and made to speak only in the Chinese language. Some former detainees said they were forced to labor without pay in factories.
The government heavily restricts the movements of independent journalists and researchers in the region, and heavily censors the internet and its own domestic media. Muslim minorities can be punished for posts on social media. But satellite images that are collected from independent providers remain outside the scope of Chinese government censorship.
Other kinds of evidence have also occasionally leaked out. In September, a drone video emerged showing hundreds of blindfolded men with their heads shaven and their arms tied behind their backs, wearing vests that say “Kashgar Detention Center.” Nathan Ruser, a researcher at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute who has done extensive satellite imagery analysis of the detention and prison systems in Xinjiang, said the video shows a prisoner transfer that took place in April 2019 — months after the government first said the system was for vocational training. Previous analyses, including by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute in November 2018, identified several dozen early camps.
“The internment and assimilation program in Xinjiang has the overall logic of colonial genocides in North America, the formalized racism of apartheid, the industrial-scale internment of Germany's concentration camps, and the police-state penetration into everyday life of North Korea,” said Rian Thum, a scholar of the history of Islam in China at the University of Nottingham.
The campaign has done deep damage to many Muslim minority groups — but especially Uighurs, who are by far the most populous ethnic minority group in Xinjiang and do not have ties to any other country. The Chinese government has heavily penalized expressions of Turkic minority culture, from Kazakh- and Uighur-language education to the practice of Islam outside of state-controlled mosques. This, combined with forced sterilizations, has led some critics to say that the campaign qualifies as genocide under international law. The Trump administration is reportedly discussing whether to formally call it a genocide, and a spokesperson for Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee for president, said on Tuesday that Biden supports the label.
“These are peaceful people in concentration camps,” said Abduweli Ayup, a Uighur linguist who was jailed and later exiled from Xinjiang after opening kindergartens that taught Uighur children in their own language. “They are businessmen and scholars and engineers. They are our musicians. They are doctors. They are shopkeepers, restaurant owners, teachers who used Uighur textbooks.
“These are the pillars of our society. Without them, we cannot exist.”

The Chinese flag is seen behind razor wire at a housing compound in Yangisar, south of Kashgar, in China's western Xinjiang region, June 4, 2019.

The position of Muslim minorities, particularly Uighurs, in China has been fraught since the Communist Party came to power in 1949. But conditions deteriorated quickly starting in 2016, when the government implemented a system of heavy-handed surveillance and policing as a means to push Muslims into a growing internment camp system for “transformation through education.” Chen, the region’s party boss, called on officials to “round up everyone who should be rounded up.”
Thousands were. Tursunay Ziyawudun, who was detained in March 2018, was one of them. When she arrived at the camp’s gates, she saw hundreds of people around her removing their jewelry, shoelaces, and belts. They were being “processed,” she said, to enter the camp through a security checkpoint.

Early on, the government remade schools, retirement homes, hospitals, and other public buildings into internment camps. There were other, older detention centers available too — BuzzFeed News identified 47 built before 2017 that have been used to lock people up in the region.
Some detention facilities are geared toward releasing detainees after several months; in others, detainees may be sentenced to prison terms, said Adrian Zenz, a leading researcher on the abuses in Xinjiang. Three former detainees interviewed by BuzzFeed News said they were held for months in detention without any charges against them — far longer than is allowed by law — before they were transferred to internment camps. The detentions picked up speed in 2017, and numbers in the camps quickly swelled until the inmates were living on top of each other.
BuzzFeed News interviewed 28 former detainees from the region, many of whom described being blindfolded and handcuffed, much like the men shown in the video. Many spoke through an interpreter. They are among a tiny minority of former detainees who were released and left the country — but they described a brutal system that they saw growing and changing with their own eyes.
Most recalled being frequently moved from camp to camp — a tactic that many believed was meant to combat overcrowding in the first generation of makeshift facilities. At the beginning of the campaign, hundreds of people were arriving on a daily basis. New batches of detainees always seemed to be coming and going.
Some former detainees described sleeping two to a twin bed, or even sleeping in shifts when there was not enough room to house all the detainees. Almost all said they received meager quantities of rice, steamed buns, and porridge, and little or no meat or other protein.

Orynbek Koksebek, a 40-year-old ethnic Kazakh, was first detained relatively early in the campaign, around the end of 2017. At first, he slept in a room with seven other men, and everyone had a bed to themselves. But within a few months, he began to notice more and more people arriving. “One day I saw a pregnant woman in shackles,” he said. “Another woman had a baby in her arms, she was breastfeeding.”
By February 2018, there were 15 men in his room, he said.
“Some of us had to share blankets or sleep on the floor,” he said. “They told us later that some of us would be given prison sentences or transferred to other camps.”
Camp officials regularly forced detainees to memorize Communist Party propaganda and Chinese characters in classrooms. But some former detainees said their facilities were too crowded for even this — instead, they had to sit on plastic stools next to their beds and stare at textbooks, sitting with their backs perfectly straight while cameras monitored them. Camp guards told them there were too many people to fit in classrooms.
For Koksebek, the claustrophobia was unbearable.
“There was a window in our room, but it was so high I couldn’t see much other than a patch of sky,” he said. “I used to wish I were a bird so I could have the freedom to fly.”








The camp at Shufu, in Xinjiang, seen by satellite on April 26, 2020. BuzzFeed News; Google Maps

On a frigid, overcast morning last December, Shohrat Zakir, the region’s governor and second-most-powerful official, gave a rare press conference at China’s State Council Information Office, located in a closed compound in central Beijing. The office is one of only a handful of government bodies in China that regularly briefs both local and international journalists, and Zakir sat with four other officials at a long podium at the front of the small room. The officials took the opportunity to tout the region’s economic growth and claim China’s campaign against terrorism in Xinjiang has been a success, calling the US government hypocritical for its criticism of China’s human rights abuses. But Zakir was the one who made international headlines.
Of those held in the camps as “trainees,” Zakir painted a rosy picture. They “have all graduated, and have realized stable employment with the government’s help, improved their quality of life, and are enjoying a happy life,” he said.
Even as reporters were scribbling down his remarks, about 2,500 miles away in Xinjiang, construction was wrapping up on a massive high-security compound near the Uighur heartland county of Shufu, just south of a winding river that flows through a countryside dotted by livestock farms. Shufu is small by Chinese standards, with a population of about 300,000 people. It has a main drag with a post office, a lottery ticket vendor, and eateries selling steamed buns and beef noodle soup. The camp was built on farmland less than a 20-minute drive away.
Before workers started construction last March, the land beneath the Shufu site was farmland too, blanketed with green vegetation. By August, workers had built a thick perimeter enclosure, with guard towers looming in the corners and in the center of walls that rise nearly 6 meters, or more than 19 feet, satellite images show. Next came the buildings inside, organized in U-shaped groups, with two five-story structures alongside a two-story one forming the base of the U. By October, two rows of barbed wire fencing appeared on either side of the main concrete-walled compound, its shadow visible in satellite images.
Just outside the walls, on the western side of the compound, two guard buildings were built — distinguished by the narrow walled pathways leading from them up to the wall that would allow guards to access the guard towers and the tops of the walls for patrols. In front of the entrance, a series of buildings provided space for prison offices and police buildings. In total BuzzFeed News estimates that there is room for approximately 10,500 prisoners at this compound — which would help provide a long-term solution to overcrowding.

“I wasn’t happy or sad. I couldn’t feel anything. Even when I was reunited with my relatives in Kazakhstan, they asked me why I didn’t seem happy to see them after so long.”

Ruser reviewed satellite images of the compound and said it was a newly built detention camp. “The vast majority of camps have watchtowers, internal fencing, and a strong external wall entranceway or exit,” he said.
Unlike the old, repurposed camps, new prisons and camps such as this one have higher security, with gates up to four stories tall and thicker walls along their borders, often with further layers of barbed wire on either side of the main walls. These features suggest they are capable of holding much larger groups of people in long-term detention.
The camps can contain not only cells where detainees sleep, but also classrooms, clinics, canteens, stand-alone shower facilities, solitary confinement rooms, police buildings, administrative offices, and small visitor centers, former detainees told BuzzFeed News. Many of the compounds also contain factories, distinguished by their blue, powder-coated metal roofs and steel frames, which are visible in satellite photos taken while they were being constructed. The police buildings, including for guards and administrative personnel, are usually located by the entrances of the compounds.
The locations of these camps and prisons in Xinjiang are not readily available. However, blanked-out portions of maps on China's Baidu make it possible to use satellite imagery to find and analyze them.
Satellite maps, like Google Earth, are made up of a grid of rectangular tiles. On Baidu, the Chinese search giant that has a map service much like Google’s, BuzzFeed News discovered that spaces containing camps, military bases, or other politically sensitive facilities were overlaid with plain light gray tiles. These “mask” tiles appeared upon zooming in on the location. These look different from the darker gray, watermarked tiles that appear when Baidu cannot load something. The “mask” tiles were also present at other locations where camps had been visited and verified by journalists, though they have since been removed.








Dabancheng District, Ürümqi Prefecture
Baidu; Planet Labs







Shule County, Kashgar Prefecture
Baidu; Planet Labs







Gaochang District, Turpan Prefecture
Baidu; Planet Labs

BuzzFeed News identified the compounds using other satellite maps — provided by Google Earth, Planet Labs, and the European Space Agency’s Sentinel Hub — which do not mask those images. For some locations where high-resolution images were not publicly available, Planet Labs used its own satellite to take new pictures, then provided them to BuzzFeed News. Read more here about how this investigation was conducted.
The images showed the facilities being built over a period of months. Details from the images offer a sense of size and scale: Counting the number of windows in building facades, for example, shows how many stories they contain.
Often, these compounds were built next door to an older prison, sharing parking lots, administrative facilities, and police barracks with the older facility, satellite images show.
BuzzFeed News found an additional 50 more compounds that were likely used for internment in the past but have lost some security features, including barbed wire fencing within compounds used to create rectangular pens, closed passages between buildings, and guard towers, with a small number having been demolished.
Ruser and other experts said this does not suggest the Chinese government is pulling back from its campaign. Many of those facilities likely still operate as low-security camps, he said. The far more important trend in Xinjiang, he said, is the government’s increased use of higher-security prisons and detention facilities.
In response to questions, the Chinese Consulate in New York echoed Zakir's December statement.

"All trainees who received courses in standard spoken and written Chinese, understanding of the law, vocational skills, and deradicalization have completed their training, secured stable employment in the society, and are living a normal life," it said.

All of the detainees interviewed by BuzzFeed News were released too long ago to have spent any time in one of the brand-new facilities — many said that before they escaped China for good, they were kept under de facto house or town arrest, unable to venture past the borders of their villages without obtaining permission from a police officer. Many — especially those with less formal education — had no idea what type of facility they were held in or even why they had been detained in the first place. They said they often drew conclusions based on weekly interrogation sessions, where police asked about actions that made them “untrustworthy.”
An older ethnic Kazakh man named Nurlan Kokteubai recognized the camp he was taken to as soon as he arrived in September 2017. Not long before, it had been a middle school.
“My daughter went to that school,” he said. “I had picked her up there before.”

Smile lines appear on Kokteubai’s deeply wrinkled face when he talks about his daughter, who was born in 1992. She later moved to Kazakhstan, where many ethnic Kazakhs from China emigrate because of the Kazakh government’s resettlement policy for people of Kazakh descent. There, she and her husband campaigned relentlessly for Kokteubai’s release in YouTube videos and long letters to human rights groups. He believes his eventual release in March 2018 was due to her campaign. Inside the camp, instead of classrooms where students like his daughter might have studied math or history, Kokteubai saw dorm rooms overcrowded with as many as 40 or 50 men each sleeping on too few bunk beds.
Though the compound itself wasn’t new, it had many updated features, such as high walls and barbed wire around the compound. And the camp was now dotted with CCTV cameras, which a guard told him could film objects as far as 200 meters away.
Another thing that was new: When you entered the gate, a huge red plaque greeted you. “Let’s learn the spirit of the 19th Communist Party Congress,” it said.
Like Kokteubai, several former detainees interviewed by BuzzFeed News said after arriving, they recognized the facilities in which they were held because they had walked or driven past them, or even visited them in their previous incarnations. But these repurposed facilities were never meant to house prisoners and were not big enough to hold all the Muslim minorities the Chinese government intended to detain.
In early 2019, workers started clearing land to expand a camp south of Ürümqi, in a town called Dabancheng, that had become infamous after reporters from BBC and Reuters visited the year before. The camp at Dabancheng was already one of the largest internment facilities in the region, capable in October 2018 of housing up to 32,500 people, according to an architectural analysis by BuzzFeed News. Since the expansion, it is now capable of housing some 10,000 more people. By November of last year another, separate compound had been completed, this one capable of holding a further 10,000 people — for a total capacity of more than 40,000, comparable to the size of the town of Niagara Falls.
"These facilities display characteristics consistent with extrajudicial detention facilities in the Xinjiang region that CSIS has previously analyzed," said Amy Lehr, director of the human rights program at Washington DC-based think tank CSIS after examining the three camps referenced in this article.



Satellite images comparing the size of Dabancheng to Central Park




Dabancheng
District,
Ürümqi, Xinjiang

Planet Labs; Google Maps

The camp at Dabancheng, Ruser said, “is the main catchment camp for Ürümqi. It’s 2 km (1.2 miles) long and was expanded late last year an extra kilometer with a new facility across the road to the west.” By comparison, the camp is about half the length of Central Park.
Kokteubai never found out precisely why he was detained. Because he’s ethnic Kazakh, he was eventually able to settle in Kazakhstan.

On the day he was released, he expected to feel joy, relief, something. Instead he felt nothing at all.
“I wasn’t happy or sad. I couldn’t feel anything,” he said. “Even when I was reunited with my relatives in Kazakhstan, they asked me why I didn’t seem happy to see them after so long.”
“It’s something I can’t explain,” he said. “It’s like my feelings died while I was in there.” ●

Chinese are a long way from developing successful engines for J-20, as their engines break down after 80 hours of operation, because of which they have to use Russian engines on the J-20, J-10 and other aircraft:
nationalinterest.org

If the J-20 Stealth Fighter Is So Amazing Why Is China Buying Russia's Su-35?
A really good question.
nationalinterest.org
nationalinterest.org
swarajyamag.com

India’s Rafale Vs China’s J-20: How The Two Fighters Stack Up Against Each Other
Here’s everything you should know.
swarajyamag.com
swarajyamag.com
 

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IAF's Sukhoi Su-30 MKIs can detect and track Chinese Chengdu J-20 stealth fighters
The IAF Sukhoi Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet.

zeenews.india.com

zeenews.india.com
IAF's Sukhoi Su-30 MKIs can detect and track Chinese Chengdu J-20 stealth fighters

The IAF Sukhoi Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet.

Indian Air Force can track and detect the state-of-art Chinese Chengdu J-20 fighters, which is reported to have stealth capabilities. The Sukhoi Su-30MKI radar can see the Chengdu J-20 hundreds of kilometres away, according to the IAF. India is planning to upgrade the Su-30 MKIs with Russian Phazotron Zhuk-AE Active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars which can track 30 targets and engage six of them simultaneously.
According to the Indian Defence Research Wing, the IAF Su-30MKIs on a sortie in the Northeast managed to track Chengdu J-20 fighters being operated by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) over Tibet. IAF chief Air Chief Marshal Birender Singh Dhanoa said the "Su-30 radar is good enough and can pick it (J-20) up from many kilometers away". He made the comment a couple of months back when asked if the J-20 which was "invisible to the radar" could be a threat.

The top IAF commander expressed confidence that the IAF was on a strong wicket and the new assets with the force were more than adequate to take on the Chengdu J-20. He added that his force was more than capable of matching the Chinese Air Force as the former has several limitations because their airstrips are located on a very high altitude.
While Chinese defence experts claim the Chengdu J-20 is China's answer to the American fifth-generation stealth fighters like F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II but western experts claim the former is just a fourth-generation medium and long-range fighter with an inferior engine compared to the US stealth fighters.

The Chinese have been building up their infrastructure to allow their fighters to take off from runways in Tibet even though the high altitude means that the jets have several limitations in terms of fuel and weapons payload. India has been countering the Chinese buildup by basing its frontline Su-30 MKIs in the northeast.
Air Chief Marshal Dhanoa had said that IAF's 13-day long wargame Gagan Shakti 2018 had achieved more than its objectives while adding that the mega exercise was not against any country in particular. The IAF finetuned its response and practiced scenarios where nuclear or chemical attacks have been carried out. Gagan Shakti 2018 also saw the IAF move its assets rapidly between the eastern and western sectors.
The 13-day Gagan Shakti 2018 exercises also saw the extensive testing of the newly-inducted homemade HAL Tejas supersonic fighter jet. Check the combat capability of the Tejas and its performance was a key area of focus of the exercises.
 

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