China`s Human Rights Violations

Ray

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Every Chinese New Year throws up stories that show up the enormous differences between the rich and the poor. Take Zou Jianming. Head of a real-estate firm in Shanghai, he has hired a helicopter to go home. For 3 million yuan, he plans to visit several cities in his home province, all by helicopter. Curiously, he has got permission to land his helicopter in public squares, where security men guard it from gaping spectators.

On the other hand, millions of migrant workers are making their long and arduous journeys home in uncertain weather conditions. Snow and blizzards have thrown the public transport system out of gear, leaving thousands of passengers stranded at railway stations, but able to communicate with expectant families back home. During the New Year, passengers can make free phone calls home from railway stations. This time, 100,000 workers in southern Guangdong, China’s manufacturing hub, have hired motorbikes to go home to avoid the long queues for train and bus tickets. So, covered from head to foot, they are driving through the snow. The police have set up rest areas for them along major highways, where they can also repair their bikes and have some hot tea.

Mixed bag

These are the lucky ones. Like very year, hundreds of migrant workers haven’t been able to go home because they haven’t got their dues. Again, the government has done little except issue stern warnings. Most vulnerable are construction workers, whose contractors disappear once the project is complete. Workers in one city gheraoed their boss’ BMW; but he sent for another car and sped off. These workers, many of them over 50, had been driven off the construction site last October, without being paid. They have been living on the site in sheds, doing odd jobs, hoping they would get their dues. Their employer, however, told reporters that their work had been so shoddy, he was planning to sue them!

In another provincial capital, workers marched to the local government office with banners naming the defaulting companies and asking the government for help; but the police dispersed them. Their foreman had disappeared a month ago; since then, they had been sent from one government office to another. Finally, one of the companies offered 80 per cent of the wages. The workers had no option but to agree.

But the new year has also thrown up some generous employers. A textile manufacturer gave air tickets to employees to go home for the New Year; others gave apartments! These bonuses were handed out not to all, but only to the ‘10 best’ employees, carrying on the tradition in Mao’s time of honouring ‘model’ workers. Some of these bonuses are promised at the start of employment to woo migrant workers.

This year too, the country’s top two leaders spent the most important family festival with the people they rule over. Wen Jiabao spent New Year in a drought-hit province, chatting with teachers, playing musical instruments and sharing the New Year’s meal with farmers. Hu Jintao also chose a poor province, where he visited the railway station to ask staff, policemen and passengers about the difficulties they faced.
Life In China
 

amoy

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the enormous differences between the rich and the poor
the current regime has less and less a 'socialist' flavour on the scale of efficiency and equity. that's why in recent years left wing thought has been regaining more and more popularity. some (disfavoured in the transition) even miss Chairman Mao's time when the social disparity was narrow and then dominant ideological inclination for the working people. rrefurbishing social security system can be seen as a balancing act recently.
 

Armand2REP

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Guy, if you are going to troll just leave. You aren't adding anything to this forum.
 
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Oracle

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Tibetan environmentalist says Chinese tortured him

London: Award-winning conservationist and philanthropist Karma Samdrup has accused his Chinese jailers of torturing him during an interrogation in Yangqi County in Xinjiang.

Karma, a prominent businessman, issued a statement in the court detailing the brutal interrogation methods, including drugs that made his ears bleed, used on him by the captors.

"If not for his voice, I would not have recognised him," The Guardian quoted his wife Zhenga Cuomao as saying.

However, the prosecutor Kuang Ying denied violence being used against Samdrup.

Samdrup founded the Three Rivers Environmental Protection group and pushed for conservation of the source region for the Yangtze, Yellow and Lancang (Mekong) rivers. His group has won several awards for its work, including the Earth Prize, which is jointly administered by Friends of the Earth Hong Kong and the Ford motor company.

Samdrup was named 'philanthropist of the year' in 2006 by state broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV) for "creating harmony between men and nature".


In January, he was arrested on charges of robbing graves and stealing cultural artifacts. His supporters, however, claim that he is being unfairly punished for lobbying the authorities for the release of his two brothers who sought to expose officials who hunted endangered animals.

He is accused of illegally collecting information about the environment, natural resources and religion, organising petitions, and providing propaganda material for supporters of the Dalai Lama. Rinchen Samdrup is in custody but has not been tried.

If convicted, the maximum penalty could be death or life imprisonment, though his lawyer says a more lenient sentence is likely. (ANI)

http://sify.com/news/tibetan-enviro...tured-him-news-international-kgxokcjjhca.html
 

ajtr

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The Least Free Places on Earth: 2010

A look at 20 places with nothing to celebrate this weekend. The following images are from the bottom 20 countries and territories from Freedom House's Freedom in the World report, with text prepared by the staff of Freedom House.


China
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/07/02/the_least_free_places_on_earth_2010?page=0,10

China is home to more than half the world's population living in "not free" countries, according to Freedom House rankings. The Chinese Communist Party keeps tight control on political power, depriving Chinese citizens of the right to elect their leaders, participate in political opposition, and hold their government accountable. In April, the government approved legislation requiring Internet and telecom network operators to monitor their networks for content relating to "state secrets." The country was also involved in a high-profile dispute this year with Internet giant Google that resulted in the company discontinuing its service to mainland China rather than continuing to filter content. Above, Chinese paramilitary police stand guard outside the Grand Bazaar in the predominantly Uighur city of Urumqi, where ethnic unrest left more than 180 people dead in July, 2009.


Tibet (China)
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/07/02/the_least_free_places_on_earth_2010?page=0,7
China maintains tight control over Tibet, a remote Himalayan region known as "the roof of the world." Although most regard the exiled Dalai Lama as their leader, Tibetans lack the right to freely elect their officials or determine their political future. Chinese security forces routinely engage in arbitrary arrest, detention, and torture, punishing even nonviolent protests against Chinese rule. China further restricted freedom of movement and exerted more official control of Tibetan Buddhism following an explosion of anti-government protests in 2008. Hundreds of political and religious prisoners reportedly remain imprisoned, and in October 2009, three Tibetans were executed, marking the first use of the death penalty in the territory since 2003. Above, police prepare to block pro-Tibet activists from crossing into the territory from Nepal.
 

tarunraju

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2009 World Map of countries by scale of freedom (it's big, so use 100% size on your PDF reader):

http://www.freedomhouse.org/uploads/fiw09/MOF09.pdf

This should be the area of interest:



Appendix:


On a side note, Indian-administered Kashmir is Freer than Pakistan-administered one. The study shows that Kashmiris under Pakistan have lesser freedom than Pakistanis and Indian Kashmiris.
 
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nitesh

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Mao's Great Leap Forward 'killed 45 million in four years' - News, Books - The Independent

Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic of China, qualifies as the greatest mass murderer in world history, an expert who had unprecedented access to official Communist Party archives said yesterday.

Speaking at The Independent Woodstock Literary Festival, Frank Dikötter, a Hong Kong-based historian, said he found that during the time that Mao was enforcing the Great Leap Forward in 1958, in an effort to catch up with the economy of the Western world, he was responsible for overseeing "one of the worst catastrophes the world has ever known".

Mr Dikötter, who has been studying Chinese rural history from 1958 to 1962, when the nation was facing a famine, compared the systematic torture, brutality, starvation and killing of Chinese peasants to the Second World War in its magnitude. At least 45 million people were worked, starved or beaten to death in China over these four years; the worldwide death toll of the Second World War was 55 million.

Mr Dik̦tter is the only author to have delved into the Chinese archives since they were reopened four years ago. He argued that this devastating period of history Рwhich has until now remained hidden Рhas international resonance. "It ranks alongside the gulags and the Holocaust as one of the three greatest events of the 20th century.... It was like [the Cambodian communist dictator] Pol Pot's genocide multiplied 20 times over," he said.

Between 1958 and 1962, a war raged between the peasants and the state; it was a period when a third of all homes in China were destroyed to produce fertiliser and when the nation descended into famine and starvation, Mr Dikötter said.

His book, Mao's Great Famine; The Story of China's Most Devastating Catastrophe, reveals that while this is a part of history that has been "quite forgotten" in the official memory of the People's Republic of China, there was a "staggering degree of violence" that was, remarkably, carefully catalogued in Public Security Bureau reports, which featured among the provincial archives he studied. In them, he found that the members of the rural farming communities were seen by the Party merely as "digits", or a faceless workforce. For those who committed any acts of disobedience, however minor, the punishments were huge.

State retribution for tiny thefts, such as stealing a potato, even by a child, would include being tied up and thrown into a pond; parents were forced to bury their children alive or were doused in excrement and urine, others were set alight, or had a nose or ear cut off. One record shows how a man was branded with hot metal. People were forced to work naked in the middle of winter; 80 per cent of all the villagers in one region of a quarter of a million Chinese were banned from the official canteen because they were too old or ill to be effective workers, so were deliberately starved to death.

Mr Dikötter said that he was once again examining the Party's archives for his next book, The Tragedy of Liberation, which will deal with the bloody advent of Communism in China from 1944 to 1957.

He said the archives were already illuminating the extent of the atrocities of the period; one piece of evidence revealed that 13,000 opponents of the new regime were killed in one region alone, in just three weeks. "We know the outline of what went on but I will be looking into precisely what happened in this period, how it happened, and the human experiences behind the history," he said.

Mr Dikötter, who teaches at the University of Hong Kong, said while it was difficult for any historian in China to write books that are critical of Mao, he felt he could not collude with the "conspiracy of silence" in what the Chinese rural community had suffered in recent history.
 

neo29

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I really wonder how did Mao manage to capture and project power. This is a true and funny incident i read some months back about the Great Leap

To boost the chances of a bumper crop during the Great Leap, Mao ordered that all sparrows and birds that are harming be crops be shot. The farmers all over China shot all the birds flying over their farms.

But this resulted in a catastrophic damage to crops as insects and mice started destroying the crops. The birds sparrows, eagles etc do feed on insects and mice, and now due to them being dead resulted increase in the insect and mice population. Mao regretted his decision.
 

nimo_cn

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I really wonder how did Mao manage to capture and project power. This is a true and funny incident i read some months back about the Great Leap

To boost the chances of a bumper crop during the Great Leap, Mao ordered that all sparrows and birds that are harming be crops be shot. The farmers all over China shot all the birds flying over their farms.

But this resulted in a catastrophic damage to crops as insects and mice started destroying the crops. The birds sparrows, eagles etc do feed on insects and mice, and now due to them being dead resulted increase in the insect and mice population. Mao regretted his decision.
What are you doing, guy? Trying to quote what had happened in China more than 30 years ago to prove China is a miserable country?

Do not pretend to know something about the Great Leap, because all the things you said about what happened in China are very superficial and shallow.

People who really know and understand what happened in China are Chinese who actually went through it.

Two weeks ago, i was coming back to school on a train from Guangzhou to Qingdao, i met a man of my father's age who is living in the countryside of Jiangsu province. We(i and other young passengers) had a great time with the old and talkative man.

He shared with us the old and hard days he had gone through. What had been mentioned most by him was the starvation. He always felt hungry because there never was enough food to eat. When there was a famine(caused by both human and nature), people had to eat potherb and leaves, or rotten sweet potato, he complained he could not have a bowel movement after eating those things. There were people starving to death in almost every village during the worst days.

Fortunately, he survived this. He also shared with us the happiness when he had a bumper harvest in 1978, the year Deng Xiaoping took over power and allocated land to peasant. Do you know what he said after he saw the grain stored in his storeroom? "Thank god, i am never going to starve again!". Well, that is true for him.

We Chinese know all the tragedies that had happened to us in the past, we have suffered and we have felt the pain. But now we have gotten over them and managed to move on. The last thing we need is to be reminded of all these by a foreigner who is just doing this to humiliate us.
 
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The Messiah

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45 million less mouths to feed....obviously rest would get more food than they would have if those people weren't killed.
 

nitesh

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Contender for Nobel prize is in Chinese prison - Yahoo! News


BEIJING – When the police came for Liu Xiaobo on a December night nearly two years ago, they didn't tell the dissident author why he was being taken away again. The line in the detention order for his "suspected crime" was left blank.

But Liu and the dozen officers who crowded into his dark Beijing apartment knew the reason. He was hours from releasing Charter 08, the China democracy movement's most comprehensive call yet for peaceful reform. The document would be viewed by the ruling Communist Party as a direct challenge to its 60-year monopoly on political power.

Liu, who over the past two decades had endured stints in prison and re-education camp, looked at the blank detention notice and lost his temper.

"At that moment, I knew the day I was expecting had finally come," his wife, Liu Xia, said recently as she recounted the night of Dec. 8, 2008. Thinking of the Beijing winter, she said she brought him a down coat and cigarettes. The police took the cigarettes away.

Liu was sentenced last Christmas Day to 11 years in prison for subversion. The 54-year old literary critic is now a favorite to win the Nobel Peace Prize — in what would be a major embarrassment to the Chinese government.

He is the best shot the country's dissident movement has had in winning the prestigious award since it began pushing for democratic change after China's authoritarian leaders launched economic, but not political, reforms three decades ago.

Last year the prize was won by President Barack Obama. Other contenders for this year's prize include Zimbabwe Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai.

In an indication of Beijing's unease, China's deputy foreign minister has warned the Nobel Institute not to give the prize to a Chinese dissident, the director of the Norway-based institute said this week. In another sign of official disapproval, an editorial on Thursday in the state-run Global Times newspaper called Liu a radical and separatist.

Chinese police continue to threaten and question some of the more than 300 people who were the first to sign Charter 08, which was co-authored by Liu. Despite the risk, thousands more have signed it since its release.

Charter 08 is an echo of Charter 77, the famous call for human rights in then-Czechoslovakia that led to the 1989 Velvet Revolution that swept away the communist regime. The charter for China calls for more freedoms and an end to the Communist Party's political dominance. "The democratization of Chinese politics can be put off no longer," it says.

Former peace prize winners Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama and Charter 77 co-drafter Vaclav Havel have joined those calling for Liu to get the award. Scholars inside and outside China have mounted letter-writing campaigns on his behalf.

"If I were the Chinese Communist Party, I would free him now. Release him. Now. So you don't have the humiliation and it's good for everyone," said Jean-Philippe Beja, a China scholar at the Paris-based Center for International Studies and Research and a longtime friend of Liu.

The blunt, sometimes earthy Liu is not always liked, even by fellow activists. "He hasn't yet become the kind of inspiring person Mandela is," AIDS activist Wan Yanhai said in a Twitter post this week, referring to the former South African leader, also a Nobel laureate.

But Liu is rare among government critics in China for being well-known not just among the dissident movement but among the wider public too.

"Across the spectrum, Chinese intellectuals and students have high respect for Liu Xiaobo," said Andrew Nathan, a professor at Columbia University in New York who once sponsored Liu as a visiting scholar. "The award of the prize ... would be viewed by most as an act friendly to China."

It was not the same when the Tibet-born Dalai Lama was awarded the peace prize in 1989. Not just the Chinese government but some of the public too were angry over the win by the exiled Buddhist leader — regarded as a traitor by officialdom for his calls for more autonomy for Tibet.

Liu first drew attention in 1986, when he criticized Chinese writers' "childish" obsession with the Nobel Prize. Two years later, he became a visiting scholar in Oslo, where the peace prize is awarded.

There, in his first time outside China, his writings became more political.

"Perhaps my personality means that I'll crash into brick walls wherever I go," Liu wrote from Oslo to Geremie Barme, a China scholar at Australian National University. "I can accept it all, even if in the end I crack my skull open."

Liu cut short a visiting scholar stint at Columbia University months later to join the Tiananmen Square protests in Beijing in 1989. He and three other older activists famously persuaded students to peacefully leave the square hours before the deadly June 4 crackdown.

"I remember clearly the difficulty and pain Liu Xiaobo and his comrades-in-arms — raised as they had been with the most radical type of an education — experienced in reaching this decision, one which only later was understood to have saved the lives of several hundred students," Xu Youyu, a professor with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, recently wrote in a public letter supporting Liu for the peace prize.

Liu went to prison after the crackdown and was released in early 1991 because he had repented and "performed major meritorious services," state media said at the time, without elaborating.

The bloody Tiananmen experience made Liu less radical, said Zhou Duo, a friend on the square.

"He used to be impetuous, but he changed a lot after June 4," Zhou said. "He became more rational and mild. He criticized the Communist Party, but he preferred having good exchanges between government and the opposition about politics and democracy."

Still, five years later Liu was sent to a re-education camp for three years for co-writing an open letter that demanded the impeachment of then-President Jiang Zemin.

Liu emerged from that sentence in 1999 to find the Internet age. He resisted the new medium of communication at first, but eventually called the Internet "God's present to China."

Now Liu only writes a diary and letters to his wife, which she keeps private. His family can visit him in prison, but they can't talk about his case or world events, and officials stand by taking notes.

His wife said the couple had never imagined Liu winning the peace prize.

"I can always predict when bad things are about to happen," she said, "but I can never totally believe that good things can become a reality."

___

Associated Press writer Isolda Morillo contributed to this report.
 

neoshangh

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In China,everyone knows that communist paty never represent Chinese people.It just represents itself and want to control people's minds.
 

Nagraj

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^^^^^^In this very forum the same thing is said about congress led UPA government by indians !!!!!!! :O
 

starikki

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In China,everyone knows that communist paty never represent Chinese people.It just represents itself and want to control people's minds.
Hey, neither can you represent Chinese people, OK? Where do you get that 'everyone' bit of information?
 

BunBunCake

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In China,everyone knows that communist paty never represent Chinese people.It just represents itself and want to control people's minds.
Majority of people in China support their government. (They may not like their leaders, but they support their government.) Only a small part of the population (funded by West) is against and wants Democracy, which is BS.

I personally don't think Democracy is such a success either. China's good just the way it is. Look at it's progress.
 

SHASH2K2

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China dismisses international concerns over missing artist


The Global Times newspaper on Wednesday called Ai a maverick who likes to engage in "legally ambiguous activities" and do things ordinary people wouldn't dare to try.

An editorial in a state—run Chinese newspaper has brushed off international concerns over the fate of Ai Weiwei, a prominent artist and activist who disappeared after being stopped by authorities at a Beijing airport four days ago.
The Global Times newspaper on Wednesday called Ai a maverick who likes to engage in "legally ambiguous activities" and do things ordinary people wouldn't dare to try.
It said Chinese law "won't bend to mavericks."
The newspaper is published by the ruling Communist Party's flagship People's Daily.
The European Union, U.S. and Britain have expressed concern over Ai's case.
 

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