China-made attacking UAV found in Nigeria

badguy2000

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well, CHina-made CH-3 attacking UAV was found in Nigeria,after falling dow/ or shot down?
It might be used to hurt/attack local rebels.

CH-3 attacking UAV can carry two missles and cruze 13 hours,at a speed of 150Miles/hour.
Its performance can match USA-made MQ9/reaper,but its price is just 1/30 of MQ-9.

USA miliary-industry complex is worring that USA-made UAV might be driven off in weapons market by china-made one.
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badguy2000

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The following is USA~made MQ~9"Reaper",its can carry 2times more missles than CHINA~made "Yilong",but its price is 30 times more . How shamelessly greedy yankees military industry complex is!
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Any link for these sales? Pakistan wAs reportedly interested in predator?
 

badguy2000

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With 30 m USD,Yankees can buy only one "reaper",while china can buy over 2 dozen "yilong" ………………that reflects exactly how much the real purchase power of yankees defence expenditure shrinks ,while USA industry base has been undermined by decades~long industry shift~out and greedy capitalists.
 
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China will always be able to undercut USA . Costs of us weapons are way too high for most countries.
 

badguy2000

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Any link for these sales? Pakistan wAs reportedly interested in predator?
Well,UAE bought yilong long ago. It is reported that s.arabia has ordered one squard of yilong already. Unlike strantgical UAV like "global hawk" or "village hawk", "Yilong" is just a tactical one quite fit to strike rebels such as Taliban or ISS.,pakistan is annoyed by rebels and surely interested on it.
 

badguy2000

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China will always be able to undercut USA . Costs of us weapons are way too high for most countries.
Two reasons causes it: 1.decades~long industry shift~out has cause many sectors of USA's defene industry supply chain missing. That is why many "made ~in~china components" can be found in yankee's weapons. 2.USA's military industry complex is tooo greedy .they might earm more by selling one "reaper" than chinese one earn by selling one squard of yilong.
 

amoy

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Chinese drone maker unveils human-carrying UAV


Chinese tech firm Ehang unveiled its first human-carrying drone at the CES in Las Vegas on Jan. 6, 2015.

The "Ehang184" drone is equipped with 1 passenger seat, 8 propellers and 4 totors. With a self weight of 200 kg, the Autonomous Aerial Vehicle has a rated load of 100 kg. Powered by electricity, it has an average cruise speed of 100 km per hour. Its battery can be fully charged in 2 hours with an endurance of 23 minutes.



(Photo/Xinhua)
 

amoy

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Any link for these sales? Pakistan wAs reportedly interested in predator?
China helps Iraq military enter drone era

Image copyright AP Iraq's Chinese-made CH-4 drone is expected to be used against IS

China's drone exports

"China," he says, "also seems to have pursued some kind of technology transfer with Pakistan whose own UAV programme is very much influenced by the Chinese."


Pakistan's armed Burraq drone unveiled in November 2013 bears a striking similarity to the Chinese CH-3.
 

sorcerer

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Did China's Military Drone Technology Espionage Pay Off in the End?

China’s industrial espionage appears to have paid off in the drone market.

As reported by Bill Gertz in late December, the CH-4 armed UAV strongly resembles the MQ-9 Reaper produced by General Atomics, and operated by the United States Air Force. According to Gertz, working from a video of the CH-4 posted online, “Both aircraft are about the same size and wing-span and both sport identical V-tails, landing gear, imaging pods and propeller-driven rear engines.”

U.S. defense officials have long suggested that China has illegally appropriated U.S. military technology through a variety of means, but mainly through cyber-intrusion. These intrusions have attacked the Pentagon, as well as defense companies, and even law firms.

To be sure, Gertz makes clear that no one can prove, as of yet, that China acquired information about U.S. drones through illicit means. And even if China did acquire data from General Atomics, the Department of the Defense, or the myriad of contractors, subcontractors, and law firms associated with the development and sale of U.S. weapons, it is by no means clear that China’s defense industry could absorb this data in ways consequential to the construction of its own drones.

Moreover, the basic components of the Reaper drone are not particularly sophisticated. The Reaper is a relatively simple airframe, dependent for its success on a set of technological advances in computing and communications that China already has access to through the civilian market. Much of what looked like industrial espionage during the Cold War actually involved parallel development, sometimes supported by legitimate, open-source acquisition of technological innovation. Put differently, even without secret data about the Reaper and other U.S. drones, China could likely construct an aircraft of similar capabilities.

Finally, it’s worth noting that China has acquired more than a little U.S. military technology through more traditional means of industrial espionage. China has repeatedly purchased U.S. missile and aerospace technology from Israel, obviating the necessity to hack into U.S. systems and steal intellectual property. Any accounting of China’s propensity to steal technology needs to reckon with the multiple avenues through which the PLA can get what it wants.


The really interesting developments will come when the Chinese begin to export drones based on what the United States believes to be proprietary American technology. If the U.S. Department of Justice could ever conclusively demonstrate that Chinese hackers stole U.S. technology, the firms that produce the drones could conceivably come under sanctions, especially if they operate in countries friendly to U.S. legal intervention. And that could make buyers uncomfortable enough to hesitate before pulling the trigger on a big arms deal.

http://thediplomat.com/2016/02/did-chinas-military-drone-technology-espionage-pay-off-in-the-end/
 

Nuvneet Kundu

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Did China's Military Drone Technology Espionage Pay Off in the End?

China’s industrial espionage appears to have paid off in the drone market.

As reported by Bill Gertz in late December, the CH-4 armed UAV strongly resembles the MQ-9 Reaper produced by General Atomics, and operated by the United States Air Force. According to Gertz, working from a video of the CH-4 posted online, “Both aircraft are about the same size and wing-span and both sport identical V-tails, landing gear, imaging pods and propeller-driven rear engines.”

U.S. defense officials have long suggested that China has illegally appropriated U.S. military technology through a variety of means, but mainly through cyber-intrusion. These intrusions have attacked the Pentagon, as well as defense companies, and even law firms.

To be sure, Gertz makes clear that no one can prove, as of yet, that China acquired information about U.S. drones through illicit means. And even if China did acquire data from General Atomics, the Department of the Defense, or the myriad of contractors, subcontractors, and law firms associated with the development and sale of U.S. weapons, it is by no means clear that China’s defense industry could absorb this data in ways consequential to the construction of its own drones.

Moreover, the basic components of the Reaper drone are not particularly sophisticated. The Reaper is a relatively simple airframe, dependent for its success on a set of technological advances in computing and communications that China already has access to through the civilian market. Much of what looked like industrial espionage during the Cold War actually involved parallel development, sometimes supported by legitimate, open-source acquisition of technological innovation. Put differently, even without secret data about the Reaper and other U.S. drones, China could likely construct an aircraft of similar capabilities.

Finally, it’s worth noting that China has acquired more than a little U.S. military technology through more traditional means of industrial espionage. China has repeatedly purchased U.S. missile and aerospace technology from Israel, obviating the necessity to hack into U.S. systems and steal intellectual property. Any accounting of China’s propensity to steal technology needs to reckon with the multiple avenues through which the PLA can get what it wants.


The really interesting developments will come when the Chinese begin to export drones based on what the United States believes to be proprietary American technology. If the U.S. Department of Justice could ever conclusively demonstrate that Chinese hackers stole U.S. technology, the firms that produce the drones could conceivably come under sanctions, especially if they operate in countries friendly to U.S. legal intervention. And that could make buyers uncomfortable enough to hesitate before pulling the trigger on a big arms deal.

http://thediplomat.com/2016/02/did-chinas-military-drone-technology-espionage-pay-off-in-the-end/
The US believes everything that has wheels or wings originated in the US. The US has been trying to destabilize the entire continent of Africa after losing out most business to China and India.

There are also many Indians living in Nigeria. If the current spate of suicide bombings turn into an all our civil war then it will be a humanitarian crisis for all Indians living there. Not to mention, Nigeria is a major source of oil to India and has multiple business interests in Africa. It's in our interest to work with China and share the workload of securing our financial assets in Africa. Why should US be alarmed at a Chinese UAV in another continent? does Africa come under the constitution of USA?
 

Bahamut

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Well good for China ,hope India Rustom follows the same and become a export success
 

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