China gives less aid to Philippines than Ikea

shiphone

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the show is over...LOL...enjoy your life and so called superiority feeling which I really don't know where it came from...
and show and blaming game would go on...LOL

some nation has Original sin....LOL..everything should be blamed....dear ' god'...or just the loser?
 
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Ray

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It is surprising that a nation that is by right one of the leading economies and a military power aspirant should require emotional sops and inspirational crutches and international acknowledgement to actually feel that they are nation on the move to lead.

That attitude smacks of an inferiority complex.

Does China and Chinese fear something? After all, as it is said, Fear is the thought of admitted inferiority.

Simone de Beauvoir, the French author, had said, "When an individual is kept in a situation of inferiority, the fact is that he does become inferior".


Here is an interesting analysis.

On China's inferiority complex

Yesterday I looked at the case of the Japanese cyclist, which raised the question of a whether there's a Chinese inferiority complex when dealing with foreigners. Global Times ran a piece along these lines saying, "A simple bike has seemingly reflected an embarrassing situation, namely that Chinese still cannot view foreigners equally. People are still too sensitive to foreign evaluations of the country and confined to an inferior mentality."

Long ago China regarded all other countries as tributaries to itself and actually had a very blatant SUPERIORITY complex. In 1792, King George III of England sent a delegation to show the Qianlong emperor some British goods and persuade him to open China to greater trade with the West. The emperor responded with a sufficiently condescending refusal that labeled foreigners barbarians and included passages like: "You, O King, from afar have yearned after the blessings of our civilization, and in your eagerness to come into touch with our converting influence have sent an embassy across the sea bearing a memorial. I have already taken note of your respectful spirit of submission."

By cutting itself off from the ever- globalized and technological world, China was left vulnerable to the Opium Wars. Then the end of the 19th century brought the ultimate slap in the face. China was pummeled in the First Sino-Japanese War after the little "barbarian" island seized the opportunity China had brushed away. This was all part of the greater "Century of Humiliation," which is oft-cited as the root of China's inferiority complex with foreigners and hunger for international validation.

So many Chinese regard it as shameless historical kowtowing when foreigners are perceived to get special treatment – like in the case with the Japanese cyclist. But do we foreigners really receive elevated treatment above our Chinese peers?

Yes and no. Global Times was absolutely right in saying Chinese still cannot view foreigners equally, but it goes both ways. Some take the 19th-20th century inferiority outlook and worship foreign things and people. But quite a few take the opposite 18th century chauvinistic attitude.

I'm often invited to stranger's homes, bought drinks, taken to dinner and offered high-paying jobs by virtue of having a foreign face. That I can't deny.

But I'm also overcharged for everything (by normal merchants and government policy). I'm used as a pawn in guanxi-maneuvering and treated like a performing monkey. I live in constant fear that I'll be booted out of the country if I flub up some bureaucratic procedure. A few people have tried to talk my girlfriend out of dating me because of the indignity it brings to China. And I'm reminded on a daily basis that my entire identity is nothing more than 外国人 (outside-country person). And if that's all a Japanese visitor deals with, he's very lucky.

Obviously most foreigners feel like they come out ahead in the end, or they wouldn't still be here. But being a foreigner entails trade-offs many Chinese don't recognize.

Today I read a very interesting piece in the Economic Observer giving a very different take on the Japanese cyclist. It said, "Is the problem that police neglect ordinary people or that ordinary people let themselves be neglected? Government is always blamed for discontent, and social problems are always ascribed to mismanagement by officials. But there are plenty of people acquiescing in this. ["¦]Why do foreigners always get special treatment in China? Is it because, unlike many Chinese who are willing to put up with the way things are, they insist on making a fuss?"

In the graduate program I'm in currently in Beijing, we're separated into a class of only foreigners and a few classes of only Chinese. A few weeks ago a Chinese classmate was told by an administrator that she wouldn't get credit for a class she'd completed. It had been approved as an elective at the beginning of the semester but, at the end, the administrator (who my friend says hates her) arbitrarily decided the course wouldn't count.

On the other side, we foreign students are accommodated at every turn. Administration holds regular meetings to hear our feedback on what we like and don't like about the program. And if someone has beef with a teacher, they'll usually get their way. On the surface this probably looks like blatant special treatment for foreigners.

But I remember last year many of the foreign and Chinese students had plans to go out together one night. However, a few hours before, the Chinese students said their teacher had scheduled a last-minute meeting to go over pointless drivel"¦at 7:00 on a Friday night.

"So?" I said. "Tell the teacher tough shit. You already have plans."

"No, she's making us go," my friend replied.

"Is she holding a gun to your head or something?" I pushed. "Tell her she needs to give you a respectful amount of notice if she expects you to show up."

"We can't," my friend scoffed gently. "I'm sorry."

The reason for the "special treatment" of foreign students became pretty clear. Another Chinese student would later talk about the administration saying, only half-jokingly,"They come and bully us because they've gotten so used to getting bullied by you foreigners."

A few months ago I asked if this kind of innate submissiveness is traditional filial culture, or if it's been hammered in from above by an authoritarian system. But wherever it comes from, in the end, people will only receive the treatment that they stand up and demand.

On China’s inferiority complex | Sinostand
 

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