China Economy: News & Discussion

Varzone

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Yes you can. You can borrow shit loads of non-existent money and just build and build until real estate becomes 30% of your GDP. GDP does not measure asset quality and that’s the trap the stupid CCP economists have fallen in trying to match the west dollar for dollar. However, the asset quality and returns of assets in democratic countries like India are much higher and more transparen.
And for the CCP politburo when all these assets start declining in value and collapsing, you can bleed the peasants even more by directing all their hard earned moneys to be used as collateral to generate even more risky debt and keep building assets that are constantly declining in value. Hence no long term value generation in your stock markets. Now that the economy has collapsed in CCP land, the party secretaries have nowhere to hide. The pants are off and peasants are lining up with sticks to bleed the CCP goons asses.
Of course the peasants get killed when they demand their money back from banks, but that is not going to stop them. CCP’s engineered, low quality GDP is at a total risk of collapse. Hence all the billionaires and millionaires are taking the first available boat to exit the dysfunctional CCPia.
Chinese have borrowed from their own future.
It's not that they don't realise what they're doing but they've made their choices.
 

ym888

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Oops! Indian Army Flaunts ‘Chinese Cameras’ To Spy On Chinese Military; You Can Buy It On Aliexpress For $80


ByParth Satam

December 1, 2022

News agency ANI and other media houses recently flaunted videos of the Indian Army’s drone hunting capability near the Line of Actual Control (LAC). While the Army exhibited its ‘technology’ against China, Beijing could be laughing in disbelief.
‘Arjun,’ the black Kite, hit the headlines when the news and social-media footage showed its ant-drone skills during the Indian and United States (US) Army’s exercise ‘Yudh Abhyas’ in Uttarakhand’s Auli.
What is interesting, somewhat embarrassing, is that the camera fastened on the Kite’s head by the Indian Army to detect and take down drones is apparently Chinese-made, according to information obtained by the EurAsian Times.
The Kite, which also has a GPS tracker tied to its body, works both parallelly and sometimes in consonance with a dog, who hears the drone and alerts his army handlers. The Indian soldiers then release the Kite, which locates the drone and takes it down with its sharp claws/talons.
Trained by the Meerut-based Remount Veterinary Corps Center, Arjun can also perform basic surveillance roles with its head-mounted camera, relaying images of the ground while flying over enemy territory.


The trained Black Kites will also be deployed at the International Border (IB) and Line of Control (LoC) with Pakistan, where there has been a slew of drone infiltrations and arms drops in Punjab and Rajasthan.
China, meanwhile, has criticized the Indo-US wargames at its border with India as interference from an extra-regional power and has urged India to independently approach its border disputes.
Chinese Cameras To Spy On Chinese Military
One of the close-up photos of the Kite on social media that showed the camera mounted reveals the logo of the manufacturer, reading as ‘FX.’

Hemraj Sharma, a EurAsian Times researcher, found that the company is a Chinese firm based in Shenzhen, often considered the technological capital of China due to the presence of many domestic hi-tech electronics, computing, and engineering firms.
Indian Army
Indian Army’s Black Kite – Via Social Media
The company is called FXT Technology, specializing in wireless backup camera systems since 2012 for a variety of transportation, industrial, agricultural and recreational purposes, according to its website. An internet search on the camera itself revealed its model as the FXT98T Micro FPV.
“The FX798T Micro FPV Camera and 5.8GHz 40CH 25mW VTX is extremely small and could be installed on almost anything. The unit is ultra-lightweight, so it is easy to place on any aircraft without affecting the center of gravity (COG),” the product information following an internet search revealed. VTX are antennas that beam footage from small cameras attached to drones to the controller screen on the ground.
A photo of the FX camera fastened on the Kite’s head from an e-commerce portal
“It’s easy to install and operate with one push button to change channels and bands. Just plug into a little 1S Lipoly battery or onto your 5V rail, and you are ready to go.
It has excellent video and low latency for such a small package. The combo also includes a splitter and a circular polarized 5.8G tuned antenna for the best video signal,” the information on one e-commerce website said.
Even US Military Is Dependent On China
Earlier in September, the Pentagon suspended the delivery of the F-35 stealth fighter after a magnet in the Honeywell-built turbomachine was found to have been made using cobalt and samarium alloy developed in China.
The Chinese alloy was later revealed to be present across all the 825 F-35s in 15 countries, including the United States. The turbomachine is an engine part that powers the starter/generator placed on the jet engine.
In October, the Pentagon waived the ban after assessing that the component did not transmit any information or harm the aircraft. However, the waiver was seen in China as American dependence on Chinese rare earth metals.
China has been known to leverage its abundance of rare earth, critical in manufacturing advanced electronics, to ensure foreign industrial investors stay in the country, comply with local laws, and part with niche technology with their local Chinese partners.
Indian Army

You Can’t Escape Chinese Goods
Chinese manufacturing dominance in electricals, electronics, and mechanical products – both finished goods and intermediate and vital components – has long been seen as a supply chain risk that Beijing can leverage.
Cheap labor, a vast trained pool of both Western and domestically educated engineers, scientists, and massive government subsidies since the mid-1970s motivated many US companies to shift their manufacturing to China.
This saved them costs, and profits swelled, pleasing shareholders, but led to a massive decline in American manufacturing, which former President Donald Trump bemoaned and rode to power in 2016.
The US-China trade war that began with Trump banning and levying tariffs on Chinese goods was a result of this very Chinese industrialization that was eroding America’s core competencies.
Chinese industry and labor were upskilled apart from becoming the manufacturing and assembly hub of even leading firms like Apple, amongst others. Chinese companies now manufacture cheap everyday electronics that are now used nearly all over the developing world.
 

ym888

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China Takes The ‘Tech Route’ To Boost Ties With The Middle-East; US Looks At Beijing-Gulf Synergy With Alarm

EXPERT REVIEWS
ByKN Pandita

December 4, 2022

Gulf Arab states have developed close ties with Beijing despite their longstanding relationship with key ally the United States, as they seek capital and technology to diversify their economies away from hydrocarbon revenues.
Gulf Countries’ Policy Shift

The primary motive catalyzing a shift in the oil-oriented policies of the Gulf countries is the timely realization that hydrocarbon energy is not sustainable.
Therefore, not wanting to be caught on the wrong foot, their full attention is gradually veering around a technology-oriented economy with the transfer of technology as the fundamental criterion of the shift.
A few months earlier, China’s NWTN — a passenger transport company — announced that it would build an electric vehicle facility in Abu Dhabi. Chinese company Xpeng Aeroht made its first public flight in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in October 2022.
The Gulf States are reported to be actively cooperating with Chinese companies in a comprehensive program of transforming not only the economies of the Gulf States but also the entire mindset of the youth, who are showing more and more inclination towards innovation and originality.
Most of the youth in these countries receive their education in prestigious institutions of western countries, including the US. Hence the impact of socio-cultural liberalization is discernible in their lifestyle.
But the policy change and the urge for diversification of economies and means of production has become a source of irritation for the policy planners in Washington. The Gulf states, in general, and Saudi Arabia, in particular, have a history of a long and close relationship with the US.
As trusted allies of the US for a long time, Washington feels that the Gulf states are now adrift because they find the Chinese option answering their requirements for the present and future.
China Replaces The US
“Gulf Arab states should consider their relationship with the United States when dealing with China,” a US official said as tensions flared between Washington and Beijing in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

“Gulf Arab states have developed close ties with Beijing despite their longstanding relationship with key ally the United States as they seek capital and technology to diversify their economies away from hydrocarbon revenues. These states have to weigh the value of their partnership with the United States,” said the US Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs.
The US has been trying to restrict Chinese influence in the Gulf states without tangible success. Despite Joe Biden explicitly arguing in July 2022 that improving US-Saudi relations is essential to “outcompete China,” it will be an uphill task with the intensification of the Gulf-China synergy.
For example, in 2022, Huawei and Saudi Digital developed a mutual understanding for adopting technologies like cloud computing, cybersecurity, and 5G, all envisioned in the Saudi ‘Vision 2030,’ which is Riyadh’s blueprint for economic diversification.
China Enters Strategic Areas
Take the item of energy; for the last two decades, the focus was on energy, and the foreign policy of the Gulf states rotated around oil production and marketing.
Developing from a focus on energy over the last two decades, tech collaboration has become a vital instrument in furthering China’s engagement with the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries.
The trade bill has gone up from about US$1.5 billion in 1990 to US$180 billion in 2019 — 11% of the bloc’s foreign trade — making China the GCC’s foremost trading partner.
China UAE
His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai; His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces; and President Xi Jinping of China
Calling it “new oil,” the Gulf countries envision an economic diversification strategy that could add a further US$255 billion to their GDP and generate 600,000 technology-related jobs by 2030. China is likely to play the principal role in reconstructing the Gulf economy.
A significant aspect that will contribute to successful economic diversification is the entry of Israel into the eco-political restructuring of regional states. Saudi Arabia and Bahrain will likely align with the UAE in mending the fence with Israel.
As we know, great-power rivalry and Iran-Abraham Accords make space for Israel’s stepping into the region’s mainstream and development agenda. China, unlike the US, has cordial relations with Iran, which improves the chances of enhancement of Gulf–China collaboration.
Since 2019, most GCC telecom firms have signed 5G contracts with Huawei. With the UAE’s G42 launching a US$10 billion fund to invest in late-stage technology companies in 2022, its engagement with China will accelerate.
China’s strategy is to provide both infrastructure and technology. That is precisely what the Gulf leadership envisions as a priority. The Digital Silk Road, introduced in 2015 as part of the Belt and Road Initiative, is a powerful conduit for realizing this regional vision.
China promises to extend its fundamental philosophy of a power-based economy to the defense arena of the GCC. The UAE purchased Chinese Wing Loong I drones in 2016 and Wing Loong II in 2018 after the United States refused to sell its latest weaponized drones, citing the impact of the war in Yemen. In 2017, Beijing and Riyadh struck a deal to manufacture CH-4 drones in Saudi Arabia.
China’s Tech-Savvy Intervention
China’s tech role in several Asian and African countries carries far-reaching implications for global strategies and power balancing. The Gulf States and the US governments shall have to work out a rational formula for the smooth conduct of affairs. In 2020, Washington labeled Huawei’s role in the UAE’s 5G projects and the value attached to their US partnership.
Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs stressed that China has “displaced the US as the world’s top high-tech manufacturer.” In terms of “artificial intelligence, 5G, quantum information science, semiconductors, biotechnology, and green energy…it has already become number one. In others, on current trajectories, it will overtake the US within the next decade.”
This, then, is the dilemma that has overtaken the think tanks in the US.
Washington would not be taking these developments lying low because China will be cutting into an extremely critical region where its interests are highly significant.
UAE’s weapons list is fairly extensive, with China reacting positively. Already, the UAE announced plans to purchase Chinese L-15 add trainers and light combat jets. US intelligence reports have also indicated that Riyadh is developing ballistic missiles with Chinese assistance.
Amid Saudi–US tension over OPEC+ decision to cut oil production, the Saudi energy minister held a virtual meeting with his Chinese counterpart to discuss cooperation on nuclear energy. This again undermines the US push for an alliance with Saudi Arabia on nuclear energy to prevent Saudi–Chinese cooperation.
In the final analysis, there has to be a balancing exercise as the world moves towards multi-polarization. The Ukrainian war has broken many entrenched perceptions, and the world order is going through a spate of realignments.
The Gulf is adjusting to a new shape and structure, among other happenings. The US will have to consider the ground realities.
 

RoaringTigerHiddenDragon

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First of all, this is the actual distribution of China's GDP -- industry is BY FAR the largest contributor to its GDP (of course) ;)

View attachment 184714

Secondly, all those "ghost cities", malls, etc. still took a lot of capital to build which is a sign of surplus wealth in the real economy. You can say they are wasteful and inefficient use of money but they would never been built if China's GDP were fake or artificial as you say.

You can only pretend you have money to build a house until you actually need to build the house ;)

Most countries cannot create infrastructure they desperately need never mind building excess whole cities like China is doing. You simply can't do that with "artificial" GDP because no one is going to accept empty air for actual materiel. The most you can say is they are wasteful.

(And the truth is we do not know if the so-called ghost cities are wasteful until you look into the future. China builds supply in advance because things especially real estate are cheaper now than in the future. But that is another discussion on developmental philosophy.)
Real estate is hidden in a lot of other categories. Land + buildings is needed for every single category. If what you are saying is true, then the CCP would not be cracking down of excess skyscrape builds.

Not a single economist anywhere in the world is going to buy your story of the CCP building for the future. Lol. That is an insane spin. Reality is the local governments were given quotas to artificially boost GDP growth through excess buildings and wasteful infrastructure. Now these local governments are caught in a severe debt trap. This is because their Ponzi schemes are going bust.

All the CCP state owned enterprises which pretty much own all of CCPia’s economy are in a massive debt trap.

Quality assets don’t put you in serious financial crisis like what the CCP is facing now. You are a fool if you think you can spin your way out of massive asset inflation created with non-existent money aka debt trap.

Today CCPia is full of excess inventory - idle assets generating negative return. This is going to hurt CCPia’s credit ratings and increase the cost of debt further. And the downward spiral continues.

Lol at trying to justify decaying and rotten theme parks, housing and commercial buildings as CCP’s foresight. You are one giant CCP bootlicker troll. 🤮
 

RoaringTigerHiddenDragon

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Oops! Indian Army Flaunts ‘Chinese Cameras’ To Spy On Chinese Military; You Can Buy It On Aliexpress For $80


ByParth Satam

December 1, 2022

News agency ANI and other media houses recently flaunted videos of the Indian Army’s drone hunting capability near the Line of Actual Control (LAC). While the Army exhibited its ‘technology’ against China, Beijing could be laughing in disbelief.
‘Arjun,’ the black Kite, hit the headlines when the news and social-media footage showed its ant-drone skills during the Indian and United States (US) Army’s exercise ‘Yudh Abhyas’ in Uttarakhand’s Auli.
What is interesting, somewhat embarrassing, is that the camera fastened on the Kite’s head by the Indian Army to detect and take down drones is apparently Chinese-made, according to information obtained by the EurAsian Times.
The Kite, which also has a GPS tracker tied to its body, works both parallelly and sometimes in consonance with a dog, who hears the drone and alerts his army handlers. The Indian soldiers then release the Kite, which locates the drone and takes it down with its sharp claws/talons.
Trained by the Meerut-based Remount Veterinary Corps Center, Arjun can also perform basic surveillance roles with its head-mounted camera, relaying images of the ground while flying over enemy territory.


The trained Black Kites will also be deployed at the International Border (IB) and Line of Control (LoC) with Pakistan, where there has been a slew of drone infiltrations and arms drops in Punjab and Rajasthan.
China, meanwhile, has criticized the Indo-US wargames at its border with India as interference from an extra-regional power and has urged India to independently approach its border disputes.
Chinese Cameras To Spy On Chinese Military
One of the close-up photos of the Kite on social media that showed the camera mounted reveals the logo of the manufacturer, reading as ‘FX.’

Hemraj Sharma, a EurAsian Times researcher, found that the company is a Chinese firm based in Shenzhen, often considered the technological capital of China due to the presence of many domestic hi-tech electronics, computing, and engineering firms.
Indian Army
Indian Army’s Black Kite – Via Social Media
The company is called FXT Technology, specializing in wireless backup camera systems since 2012 for a variety of transportation, industrial, agricultural and recreational purposes, according to its website. An internet search on the camera itself revealed its model as the FXT98T Micro FPV.
“The FX798T Micro FPV Camera and 5.8GHz 40CH 25mW VTX is extremely small and could be installed on almost anything. The unit is ultra-lightweight, so it is easy to place on any aircraft without affecting the center of gravity (COG),” the product information following an internet search revealed. VTX are antennas that beam footage from small cameras attached to drones to the controller screen on the ground.
A photo of the FX camera fastened on the Kite’s head from an e-commerce portal
“It’s easy to install and operate with one push button to change channels and bands. Just plug into a little 1S Lipoly battery or onto your 5V rail, and you are ready to go.
It has excellent video and low latency for such a small package. The combo also includes a splitter and a circular polarized 5.8G tuned antenna for the best video signal,” the information on one e-commerce website said.
Even US Military Is Dependent On China
Earlier in September, the Pentagon suspended the delivery of the F-35 stealth fighter after a magnet in the Honeywell-built turbomachine was found to have been made using cobalt and samarium alloy developed in China.
The Chinese alloy was later revealed to be present across all the 825 F-35s in 15 countries, including the United States. The turbomachine is an engine part that powers the starter/generator placed on the jet engine.
In October, the Pentagon waived the ban after assessing that the component did not transmit any information or harm the aircraft. However, the waiver was seen in China as American dependence on Chinese rare earth metals.
China has been known to leverage its abundance of rare earth, critical in manufacturing advanced electronics, to ensure foreign industrial investors stay in the country, comply with local laws, and part with niche technology with their local Chinese partners.
Indian Army

You Can’t Escape Chinese Goods
Chinese manufacturing dominance in electricals, electronics, and mechanical products – both finished goods and intermediate and vital components – has long been seen as a supply chain risk that Beijing can leverage.
Cheap labor, a vast trained pool of both Western and domestically educated engineers, scientists, and massive government subsidies since the mid-1970s motivated many US companies to shift their manufacturing to China.
This saved them costs, and profits swelled, pleasing shareholders, but led to a massive decline in American manufacturing, which former President Donald Trump bemoaned and rode to power in 2016.
The US-China trade war that began with Trump banning and levying tariffs on Chinese goods was a result of this very Chinese industrialization that was eroding America’s core competencies.
Chinese industry and labor were upskilled apart from becoming the manufacturing and assembly hub of even leading firms like Apple, amongst others. Chinese companies now manufacture cheap everyday electronics that are now used nearly all over the developing world.
A planted article. Everyone knows it is going to take some time for India to develop a competitive electronics manufacturing ecosystem. So for sure this is going to be the case for now. This does NOT imply in any way that Indian military is hostage to CCPia’s low cost electronics. Lol.
Even the US has several CCPia made components in its arsenal. They are slowly getting rid of all that. So will india. As the local electronics ecosystem matures (and it is already happening at a rapid pace), Indian companies will easily produce these. Remember ISRO produces highly advanced cameras for its satellites indigenously. Low cost economics in electronics products will happen sooner than later in India.

A country where its private companies can do this can manufacture any electronic, other than the highest end of electronics.

 

ym888

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Beijing tops Nature Index Science cities ranking
chinadaily.com.cn | Updated: 2022-11-29 14:31

Beijing remains at the top spot in the newly released Nature Index 2022 Science cities, followed by New York metropolitan area, China News Service reported.
The ranking analyzed the scientific research output in 82 natural science journals of major cities and metropolitan areas.
According to the ranking, Shanghai climbed to the third place from the fifth in 2020, Boston metropolitan area and San Francisco Bay Area take the fourth and fifth spots.
Other Chinese cities also made it on the list. Nanjing takes the eighth spot while Guangzhou rises to the tenth spot. Wuhan, Hefei, Hangzhou and Tianjin are included in the top 20.
The index shows that Beijing leads the world in high-quality scientific research output in physics, followed by Shanghai and Boston. Cities in the US lead in life science, with New York, Boston, San Francisco Bay Area and Baltimore-Washington taking the top 4 spots in articles published on life science.
 

Hari Sud

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Beijing tops Nature Index Science cities ranking
chinadaily.com.cn | Updated: 2022-11-29 14:31

Beijing remains at the top spot in the newly released Nature Index 2022 Science cities, followed by New York metropolitan area, China News Service reported.
The ranking analyzed the scientific research output in 82 natural science journals of major cities and metropolitan areas.
According to the ranking, Shanghai climbed to the third place from the fifth in 2020, Boston metropolitan area and San Francisco Bay Area take the fourth and fifth spots.
Other Chinese cities also made it on the list. Nanjing takes the eighth spot while Guangzhou rises to the tenth spot. Wuhan, Hefei, Hangzhou and Tianjin are included in the top 20.
The index shows that Beijing leads the world in high-quality scientific research output in physics, followed by Shanghai and Boston. Cities in the US lead in life science, with New York, Boston, San Francisco Bay Area and Baltimore-Washington taking the top 4 spots in articles published on life science.
BS
 

ym888

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The driving forces behind the success of Beijing and Shanghai
China’s capital city still has a higher research output, but its innovating second city is catching up.

Astrophysicist Cao Zhen sits in a boat across in a water-filled cavern at the Large High-Altitude Air Shower Observatory

A physicist navigates a boat across a cavern with submerged sensors at China’s Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory.Credit: Mark Schiefelbein/AP/Shutterstock
Jing Qu’s lab at the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ (CAS) Institute of Zoology researches the cellular causes of ageing, developing stem-cell and gene therapies to treat diseases such as osteoarthritis. Qu was drawn to CAS, which she joined in 2012 after leaving the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, California, because of its generous funding, its leading role in China’s stem-cell research, and the opportunity to conduct biomedical research in non-human primates.


Nature Index 2022 Science cities

With a grant from China’s Ministry of Science and Technology and more from the National Natural Science Foundation of China, a state-affiliated research funder, Qu’s Beijing-based team is looking for ageing markers in the organs of crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis). “Monkeys are much more similar to humans, genetically and anatomically” than more commonly used animals for research, such as rodents, “so they are a better animal model for biology research”, says Qu. “Rodents don’t always show the same phenotypes as humans, but we see a very similar ageing pattern in monkeys.”
Along with many others, Qu’s move back to China from the United States is helping to boost leading Chinese institutions, and the cities where they are based, as centres of research excellence. Beijing continues to rank as the leading science city in the Nature Index, which tracks research output in 82 selected natural-sciences journals. The city gained its position in 2016, overtaking the New York Metropolitan Area, as China’s long-term goal to rival the United States scientifically began to bear fruit. Other Chinese cities are joining the fray: Shanghai ranks third, overtaking the Boston Metropolitan Area in Massachusetts, and San Francisco Bay Area, California, since the last Science Cities analysis in 2021. New York remains second.
Beijing and Shanghai’s rapid increase in output is driven by central and local governments’ commitment in making them innovation-driven science centres. Greatly increased funding in research and development (R&D) has encouraged collaboration with international partners, drawing much talent.
Concentration of resources
Together, the cities host dozens of elite universities and research institutes that are talent magnets, says Denis Simon, a China technology specialist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. They boast 5 of the leading 50 institutions worldwide in the Nature Index, as measured by its key metric, Share — a fractional count of articles that takes into account the proportion of authors affiliated with an institution or location. Beijing also has 8 of the 39 universities selected by Project 985, an initiative started in 1998 to create world-class institutions through a huge funding boost, and Shanghai has four. CAS has 38 institutions in Beijing and 15 in Shanghai.
“Prestigious schools like the 985 universities provide good technology platforms and instruments,” says Xuefeng Jiang, a chemist at East China Normal University in Shanghai, one of the city’s Project 985 institutions. Jiang’s career journey mirrors Qu’s. In 2011, after finishing his postdoctoral programme at Scripps Research in San Diego, California, Jiang was determined to join a 985 university.
“Having the hardware and resources ready upon joining means we can immediately start working on our research without having to source and set up new equipment,” he says.
Two researcher working in a laboratory

Wei Wang (left) and Jing Qu work on a genome-wide screen for novel ageing regulatory genes.Credit: Tingshu Wang/Reuters/Alamy
These elite institutions oversee most of China’s top scientific instruments. For example, the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Telescope, in southwestern Guizhou, is run by CAS’s National Astronomical Observatory in Beijing. One of the newest facilities is the cosmic ray detector — the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) — in southwestern Sichuan run by CAS’s Institute of High Energy Physics, also in Beijing.
Such investment “will inevitably lead to a high level of scientific output”, says Min Zha, an astrophysicist at the Institute of High Energy Physics in Beijing and a member of the LHAASO team. Zha joined the institute in 2005 after working at the University of Leeds, UK, as a postdoctoral researcher. At the time, particle astrophysics in China was still trying to catch up with more advanced countries in the field. But with a highly sensitive detector, which has yielded findings on the origin of cosmic rays, China has become competitive internationally, Zha says. The Nature Index shows that Beijing leads the world in high-quality output in the field of physical sciences, ahead of Shanghai and Boston in second and third.
Robust industry
In addition to resources available at the 985 universities, Jiang was drawn to Shanghai for its strong links between academia and industry.
The Zhangjiang Science City in suburban Shanghai, for example, boasts one of the country’s most established biotechnology hubs. The region, formerly known as the Zhangjiang High-Tech Park, began operations in 1992. Since then, the municipal and central governments have continued to expand the region, and the science city is now home to more than 18,000 companies and 440 R&D institutions. Several of the world’s largest pharmaceutical firms, such as AstraZeneca and Roche, have set up R&D centres at the Zhangjiang Pharma Valley founded in 1994. Jiang, who designs sulfur-containing compounds with applications from material synthesis to drug development, collaborates with companies in cities in the neighbouring provinces of Zhejiang and Jiangsu, which form the Yangtze River Delta Economic Zone with Shanghai. Industry colleagues around the city are a source of valuable feedback to academic research partners, Jiang says. These companies also bring a large number of employment opportunities, he adds, which attract the next generation of researchers to the region.
“Chemistry is a field that can really benefit from industry feedback,” Jiang says. “For us in academia, we need to test our ideas, and market demands also guide our research.”
Beijing has similar industry clusters. These include the Zhongguancun Science Park, China’s first high-tech park. The park is home to dozens of universities including Tsinghua University and CAS’s institutions. It also boasts around 300 R&D centres of multinational corporations. R&D in Beijing and Shanghai benefits from such an agglomeration effect, in which industry, universities and government institutions such as CAS cluster and interact with each other to form a feedback loop, says Caroline Wagner, a science policy researcher at Ohio State University in Columbus. This feedback system can accelerate scientific knowledge creation and pushes research more and more towards the frontiers of science.
As the research breaks new ground, the scientists in these cities have also sought to increase their global collaboration. This forging of links outside China has been accelerated by the millions of students and scientists who have sought scientific experience abroad since the 1980s. Many of them stay abroad, but collaborate with peers back home.
However, an increasing number of students and scientists have been returning in recent years. For instance, the number of returning Chinese graduates as a proportion of students leaving to study overseas increased from 55% in 2011 to nearly 80% in 2016, according to official government figures. Meanwhile, most of the returning scholars are choosing Beijing and Shanghai as their destinations, Simon says. The trend is partly driven by the cities’ growing research capacity, but also a result of government efforts to lure scientists by offering them competitive pay and the promise of their own labs, he adds. Many of those returning also maintain collaborative relationships with their former colleagues.
Climate scientist Zhu Liu returned to China in 2018 after his postdoctoral programmes at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Now at Tsinghua University, Liu continues to collaborate with researchers at these institutions, as well as colleagues in Japan and France, to develop the international Carbon Monitor data set. The tool launched in 2019 and uses real-time data to monitor CO2 emissions from global fossil-fuel combustion and cement production with near-global coverage, including COVID-19 pandemic impacts. The international team hopes the monitor will be a more efficient system for quantifying global CO2 emissions in near-real-time.
The collaborative relationship means they can share resources. Liu, for instance, is using satellite data from his collaborators in the United States. “Problems like climate change should be a global effort, so it’s important to stay connected with peers in other countries.”
Line graphs comparing Share for the top 5 cities in physics and organic chemistry

Source: Nature Index
Despite the importance of such relationships, Wagner and other researchers have, in the past year, found evidence of China’s international research collaboration with the United States coming under pressure. Wagner says that the pandemic’s travel restrictions had clearly played a part given “we know that as much as 90% of international collaborations begin face-to-face”. But significantly, research from Wagner, co-authored in a preprint with Xiaojing Cai at Yangzhou University in China (C. S. Wagner and X. Cai Preprint at arXiv ; 2022) has also suggested that US–China collaboration as a proportion of global research output began falling — from a peak of around 10% of all internationally co-authored research — before the pandemic. Given the share of global output co-authored between scientists in China and the European Union has continued to increase, this points to political issues, such as US-led investigations into research collaborations with China, having an impact, the authors say.
It is maybe too early to assess whether any damage done to US–China collaboration is feeding into city performance, but it will be an important trend to watch. One consideration may be whether fraying links between the countries will make it harder for cities such as Beijing and Shanghai to close the gap in life sciences, the area covered by the Nature Index where leading US science cities still have the edge. Beijing is fifth for Share in life sciences, behind four American cities — New York, Boston, the San Francisco Bay Area and Baltimore-Washington — and Shanghai is seventh.
Among the reasons for China’s lag in life sciences was an emphasis on fields related to industrialization after the People’s Republic of China was founded in 1949, according to an article co-authored by Qu and published in April (J. Chen et al. Bull. Chin. Acad. Sci. 37, 308–316; 2022). The country’s research in this area accelerated years later than in more developed countries.
However, the central and provincial-level governments are shifting focus and increasing investments. In 2011, the central government listed biotechnology as a development priority in its five-year policy blueprint. And in the guideline for 2021 to 2025, the government plans to further develop its ‘bioeconomy’ that includes health care and agriculture.
Catching up in life sciences
In 2021, the Shanghai government also announced plans to expand the industry cluster in Zhangjiang and build the city into an “internationally influential innovation centre” in biomedicine. The pledge includes various measures that encourage R&D, including offering up to 30 million yuan (US$4.3 million) in subsidy for developing new drugs locally.
China clearly has ambitions in life sciences, Simon says. Bringing biologists such as Yigong Shi, previously a professor in molecular biology at Princeton University, and Yi Rao, who held a professorship at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, back to the country shows that “the leadership is there to understand what China has to do to catch up in these areas”, he adds.
Shi joined Tsinghua University in 2008 before becoming founding president of Westlake University, China’s first research-focused private university in 2018, and Rao became dean of Peking University’s School of Life Sciences in Beijing in 2007.
“China’s research has grown greatly,” Qu says. “Many scientists, including myself, think opportunities in China are the same or better than those abroad. Having good teachers in these places also means we’ll cultivate students who can push the field forward.”
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-022-02882-7

This article is part of Nature Index 2022 Science cities, an editorially independent supplement. Advertisers have no influence over the content.
 

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  • NATURE INDEX
  • 25 November 2022
Leading science cities by the numbers
How the top five performers weigh up on population, research and the cost of living.

Beijing and Shanghai have made considerable progress since 2015, gaining on and overtaking some of the United States’ top science cities. Boston, New York and San Francisco have meanwhile fallen slightly in their output of science papers within the Nature Index. Changes to each of the leading five science cities’ adjusted Share since 2015 are shown below, along with a breakdown of the top collaborating institutions within each city. Because large network organizations, such as the Chinese Academy of Sciences, span multiple cities, we have counted their constituent bodies instead when calculating the number of institutions in the top 500 of the Index. All population statistics date from 2020. GDP per capita figures in Chinese cities date from 2021 and in US cities date from 2019. All currency data expressed in US dollars.
Line graph showing adjusted Share for the leading 5 science cities

Sources: Nature Index, National Bureau of Statistics of China, Statista, Science Cities (Savills, 2021), US Census Bureau; data analysis: Bo Wu; infographic: Tanner Maxwell, Simon Baker and Benjamin Plackett
1. Beijing
Population:
21.9 million
GDP per capita: $27,253
Average scientist salary: $34,830
Number of institutions in Nature Index top 500: 23
China’s capital has rapidly grown its adjusted Share in recent years to cement its position as the world’s leading science city.
Graphs showing the leading institutional partnership and proportion of China’s Share for Beijing

Sources: Nature Index, National Bureau of Statistics of China, Statista, Science Cities (Savills, 2021); data analysis: Bo Wu; infographic: Tanner Maxwell, Simon Baker and Benjamin Plackett
2. New York metropolitan area
Population:
20.1 million
GDP per capita: $81,902
Average scientist salary: $70,770
Number of institutions in Nature Index top 500: 14
The Big Apple remains the top US science city, buoyed by the many research institutions based in the city; its leading collaboration is between the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and The Rockefeller University.
Graphs showing the leading institutional partnership and proportion of the Unites States’ Share for New York

Sources: Nature Index, Statista, Science Cities (Savills, 2021), US Census Bureau; data analysis: Bo Wu; infographic: Tanner Maxwell, Simon Baker and Benjamin Plackett
3. Shanghai
Population:
24.9 million
GDP per capita: $25,700
Average scientist salary: $36,550
Number of institutions in Nature Index top 500: 12
China’s second science city is rapidly growing its adjusted Share and has overtaken both the San Francisco Bay Area and Boston in recent years. If this pace of change continues, it seems likely that the city could also surpass New York in the coming years.
Graphs showing the leading institutional partnership and proportion of China’s Share for Shanghai

Sources: Nature Index, National Bureau of Statistics of China, Statista, Science Cities (Savills, 2021); data analysis: Bo Wu; infographic: Tanner Maxwell, Simon Baker and Benjamin Plackett
4. Boston metropolitan area
Population:
4.9 million
GDP per capita: $86,953
Average scientist salary: $83,830
Number of institutions in Nature Index top 500: 7
A strong performance in the life sciences from Boston’s well-established institutions such as Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology helps to secure this city a spot in the leading five science cities
Graphs showing the leading institutional partnership and proportion of the Unites States’ Share for Boston

Sources: Nature Index, Statista, Science Cities (Savills, 2021), US Census Bureau; data analysis: Bo Wu; infographic: Tanner Maxwell, Simon Baker and Benjamin Plackett
5. San Francisco Bay Area
Population:
6.7 million
GDP per capita: $112,271
Average scientist salary: $94,170
Number of institutions in Nature Index top 500: 6
The potential of large-scale collaborations between universities and government institutions is showcased here by the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
Graphs showing the leading institutional partnership and proportion of the Unites States’ Share for San Francisco

Sources: Nature Index, Statista, Science Cities (Savills, 2021), US Census Bureau; data analysis: Bo Wu; infographic: Tanner Maxwell, Simon Baker and Benjamin Plackett
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-022-02881-8

This article is part of Nature Index 2022 Science cities, an editorially independent supplement. Advertisers have no influence over the content.
 

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  • NATURE INDEX
  • 25 November 2022
How well connected are the world’s leading science cities?
When it comes to scientific collaborations, China’s cities are much less interconnected than those in the United States.

Although many cities boast multiple research institutions that readily collaborate with each other, research is rarely confined by city limits. The frequency and depth of collaborations between scientists who live and work in different places helps to create strong hubs of research and innovation. When mapping out which cities are collaborating with which, clear differences emerge between China and the United States.
The United States has a much more complex network of collaborations between its cities whereas China’s network is heavily centralized around Beijing and Shanghai.
How to read these charts
This graphics show the 40 biggest collaborations between cities in China and the United States in the Nature Index by bilateral collaboration score for the year 2021. The width of the connections represents the collaboration scores and the size of the circles show a city’s total Share in the Index. The exact Share is also shown numerically. The United States and China represent the leading two locations in the Index by total Share.
China
Beijing acts as the centre of China’s city collaboration network. Many of the leading collaborations are with Beijing, and cities with multiple collaborations tend to have their largest collaboration with China’s capital. Although collaborations in China are mostly centred on either Beijing or Shanghai, a few other nodes are beginning to emerge — most notably in Nanjing.
Graphic showing the China’s city collaboration network

Source: Nature Index; data analysis: Bo Wu; infographic: Tanner Maxwell, Simon Baker and Benjamin Plackett
United States
The city collaboration network in the United States is centred around three primary hubs — the New York metropolitan area (MA), Boston MA and San Francisco Bay Area. Compared with China, there are fewer cities within the US top 40 collaborations, but the cities tend to be more interlinked. Oakridge and Knoxville are not connected to the wider web, but the collaboration score between these two Tennessean cities is significant because they are geographically close to each other, allowing researchers at the Oakridge National Laboratory and universities located in Knoxville to easily work with each other.
Graphic showing the United States’ city collaboration network

Source: Nature Index; data analysis: Bo Wu; infographic: Tanner Maxwell, Simon Baker and Benjamin Plackett
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-022-02883-6

This article is part of Nature Index 2022 Science cities, an editorially independent supplement. Advertisers have no influence over the content.
 

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Beijing tops Nature Index Science cities ranking
chinadaily.com.cn | Updated: 2022-11-29 14:31

Beijing remains at the top spot in the newly released Nature Index 2022 Science cities, followed by New York metropolitan area, China News Service reported.
The ranking analyzed the scientific research output in 82 natural science journals of major cities and metropolitan areas.
According to the ranking, Shanghai climbed to the third place from the fifth in 2020, Boston metropolitan area and San Francisco Bay Area take the fourth and fifth spots.
Other Chinese cities also made it on the list. Nanjing takes the eighth spot while Guangzhou rises to the tenth spot. Wuhan, Hefei, Hangzhou and Tianjin are included in the top 20.
The index shows that Beijing leads the world in high-quality scientific research output in physics, followed by Shanghai and Boston. Cities in the US lead in life science, with New York, Boston, San Francisco Bay Area and Baltimore-Washington taking the top 4 spots in articles published on life science.
Green index . 🤣🤣

From China daily. the gutter mouth piece of CCP.

Screenshot_20221205_083202_Brave.jpg



Shady website . Index Made for CCP Muppets




In reality. Green paint goes brrr.


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20221205_083256.jpg
 

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Leading 200 science cities
The leading 200 science cities and metropolitan areas ranked by article Share (Share) in 2021. Also listed are each city’s article count (Count) in 2021, and its contribution to the location’s total Share of the year.

* Click on column headers to sort

RankCity/metropolitan areaLocationShare 2021Count 2021Contribution to
location's Share (%)
1BeijingChina mainland3,280.097,16719.6%
2New York metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)2,086.255,07710.5%
3ShanghaiChina mainland1,833.003,97810.9%
4Boston metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)1,829.564,3779.2%
5San Francisco Bay AreaUnited States of America (USA)1,666.093,9078.4%
6Baltimore - WashingtonUnited States of America (USA)1,347.173,5716.8%
7Tokyo metropolitan areaJapan1,234.572,72438.8%
8NanjingChina mainland1,126.432,3966.7%
9Paris metropolitan areaFrance939.252,69343.6%
10GuangzhouChina mainland903.672,1465.4%
11WuhanChina mainland850.741,7675.1%
12Los Angeles metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)843.652,2514.2%
13London metropolitan areaUnited Kingdom (UK)829.152,50422.1%
14Seoul metropolitan areaSouth Korea828.251,76652.0%
15Chicago metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)787.361,9984.0%
16HefeiChina mainland656.491,5623.9%
17ZürichSwitzerland628.631,55043.1%
18Singapore*Singapore618.811,337100%
19HangzhouChina mainland605.921,4583.6%
20TianjinChina mainland577.511,1543.4%
21San Diego metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)566.931,4452.9%
22CambridgeUnited Kingdom (UK)566.921,64515.1%
23Hong KongChina mainland552.901,4313.3%
24MunichGermany520.901,47810.8%
25Philadelphia metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)520.481,3532.6%
26OxfordUnited Kingdom (UK)484.051,57712.9%
27Berlin metropolitan areaGermany483.521,43610.0%
28ShenzhenChina mainland465.841,4572.8%
29Xi’anChina mainland430.311,0062.6%
30ChengduChina mainland415.838682.5%
31Houston metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)414.081,0702.1%
32Seattle metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)395.791,2032.0%
33MelbourneAustralia392.631,22530.3%
34ChangshaChina mainland381.437872.3%
35ChangchunChina mainland374.087082.2%
36JinanChina mainland350.397622.1%
37Atlanta metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)341.439541.7%
38Ann ArborUnited States of America (USA)337.818561.7%
39Toronto metropolitan areaCanada337.3589321.1%
40SydneyAustralia323.241,00024.9%
41DaejeonSouth Korea322.1783020.2%
42LausanneSwitzerland312.8285821.5%
43KyotoJapan298.768119.4%
44IthacaUnited States of America (USA)298.378481.5%
45Barcelona metropolitan areaSpain297.811,00926.0%
46CopenhagenDenmark294.0097967.3%
47MoscowRussia284.9996651.5%
48SuzhouChina mainland279.486541.7%
49DalianChina mainland278.336011.7%
50FuzhouChina mainland276.716181.7%
51ChongqingChina mainland276.335541.6%
52MadridSpain273.0098323.8%
53OsakaJapan269.377068.5%
54StockholmSweden267.3094338.8%
55Montreal metropolitan areaCanada263.2374916.5%
56Dallas - Fort WorthUnited States of America (USA)261.016261.3%
57TsukubaJapan260.369628.2%
58ViennaAustria259.6784566.9%
59TaipeiTaiwan249.2872059.6%
60St. LouisUnited States of America (USA)248.836281.3%
61BoulderUnited States of America (USA)246.847451.2%
62AustinUnited States of America (USA)244.386901.2%
63XiamenChina mainland240.895301.4%
64PittsburghUnited States of America (USA)232.837571.2%
65HeidelbergGermany232.248254.8%
66UrbanaUnited States of America (USA)232.055771.2%
67LanzhouChina mainland230.724971.4%
68QingdaoChina mainland216.785131.3%
69Nagoya metropolitan areaJapan216.046396.8%
70BrisbaneAustralia215.8058816.6%
71Vancouver metropolitan areaCanada213.0065113.3%
72DresdenGermany210.336444.3%
73Amsterdam metropolitan areaNetherlands205.6682421.9%
74Minneapolis - Saint PaulUnited States of America (USA)205.526121.0%
75MadisonUnited States of America (USA)205.056201.0%
76GöttingenGermany194.725204.0%
77DurhamUnited States of America (USA)190.816031.0%
78State CollegeUnited States of America (USA)190.595531.0%
79HamburgGermany188.477293.9%
80MilanItaly186.9374515.9%
81ReẖovotIsrael186.2443327.7%
82Santa BarbaraUnited States of America (USA)183.894800.9%
83EdinburghUnited Kingdom (UK)182.116184.8%
84Chapel HillUnited States of America (USA)176.774830.9%
85HarbinChina mainland173.833911.0%
86GenèveSwitzerland172.1268611.8%
87GrenobleFrance172.036468.0%
88BengaluruIndia169.4935813.8%
89LeuvenBelgium162.5151237.9%
90MünsterGermany160.393773.3%
91ManchesterUnited Kingdom (UK)159.335764.2%
92DavisUnited States of America (USA)157.574840.8%
93RomeItaly157.2774513.4%
94IrvineUnited States of America (USA)154.504410.8%
95Bristol metropolitan areaUnited Kingdom (UK)153.905474.1%
96ZhengzhouChina mainland150.005450.9%
97UtrechtNetherlands148.3448315.8%
98College StationUnited States of America (USA)146.504060.7%
99JerusalemIsrael143.7130021.3%
100Tel AvivIsrael143.3346421.3%
101ColumbusUnited States of America (USA)142.344710.7%
102West LafayetteUnited States of America (USA)141.843800.7%
103Kolkata metropolitan areaIndia140.5331911.5%
104SendaiJapan140.364344.4%
105WürzburgGermany140.054072.9%
106HelsinkiFinland139.9153263.2%
107MainzGermany139.315122.9%
108KarlsruheGermany132.003992.7%
109NashvilleUnited States of America (USA)130.713850.7%
110HaifaIsrael130.3634619.4%
111PragueCzech Republic129.7053861.0%
112BaselSwitzerland127.713628.8%
113Denver metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)127.293460.6%
114PohangSouth Korea125.563027.9%
115Frankfurt am MainGermany124.794152.6%
116SapporoJapan121.332943.8%
117UppsalaSweden120.9850717.6%
118LyonFrance120.864685.6%
119Mumbai metropolitan areaIndia119.813299.8%
120GlasgowUnited Kingdom (UK)119.364473.2%
121WaterlooCanada118.382777.4%
122FreiburgGermany118.253492.4%
123WarsawPoland117.3743940.7%
124TübingenGermany114.224032.4%
125ValenciaSpain113.744199.9%
126GöteborgSweden113.6634316.5%
127BloomingtonUnited States of America (USA)109.463800.6%
128StrasbourgFrance108.793515.1%
129TucsonUnited States of America (USA)108.464300.5%
130Central National Capital Region (Delhi)India108.043118.8%
131BonnGermany107.844812.2%
132ToulouseFrance107.433475.0%
133AachenGermany107.363842.2%
134JeddahSaudi Arabia107.3632685.3%
135CharlottesvilleUnited States of America (USA)107.213270.5%
136CanberraAustralia105.593388.1%
137ErlangenGermany105.402882.2%
138GainesvilleUnited States of America (USA)105.073800.5%
139MontpellierFrance104.063344.8%
140Phoenix metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)104.033400.5%
141NanchangChina mainland103.832150.6%
142Fukuoka metropolitan areaJapan103.513213.2%
143EdmontonCanada102.573016.4%
144LeipzigGermany102.533462.1%
145TriesteItaly101.984288.7%
146GroningenNetherlands101.5935510.8%
147Salt Lake CityUnited States of America (USA)100.212900.5%
148East LansingUnited States of America (USA)99.223390.5%
149OttawaCanada98.973306.2%
150KölnGermany98.593542.0%
151GentBelgium98.4532622.9%
152RiversideUnited States of America (USA)98.203060.5%
153KunmingChina mainland98.162890.6%
154SouthamptonUnited Kingdom (UK)97.713432.6%
155AarhusDenmark97.5027922.3%
156LisbonPortugal97.4538658.2%
157Los AlamosUnited States of America (USA)94.433070.5%
158UlsanSouth Korea93.592165.9%
159RaleighUnited States of America (USA)93.462460.5%
160DelftNetherlands93.262539.9%
161Oak RidgeUnited States of America (USA)92.923680.5%
162ShenyangChina mainland92.202530.6%
163PerthAustralia91.773077.1%
164JenaGermany91.312791.9%
165São PauloBrazil90.4544928.9%
166ProvidenceUnited States of America (USA)90.433030.5%
167RichlandUnited States of America (USA)89.872680.5%
168MarseilleFrance88.483684.1%
169LundSweden88.0038212.8%
170NingboChina mainland86.342300.5%
171BernSwitzerland85.643365.9%
172AmherstUnited States of America (USA)84.402780.4%
173LeedsUnited Kingdom (UK)84.022862.2%
174StuttgartGermany83.602341.7%
175BrusselsBelgium82.8336119.3%
176DurhamUnited Kingdom (UK)82.202692.2%
177Saint PetersburgRussia81.7237014.8%
178OsloNorway81.2839141.8%
179RochesterUnited States of America (USA)80.082560.4%
180NaplesItaly80.044116.8%
181LiverpoolUnited Kingdom (UK)79.413932.1%
182ExeterUnited Kingdom (UK)79.082902.1%
183NijmegenNetherlands77.392848.2%
184ClevelandUnited States of America (USA)76.432540.4%
185DublinIreland75.9634373.8%
186JülichGermany75.952791.6%
187Miami metropolitan areaUnited States of America (USA)75.672750.4%
188Fort CollinsUnited States of America (USA)74.792140.4%
189TaiyuanChina mainland74.682740.4%
190BuffaloUnited States of America (USA)74.652570.4%
191RegensburgGermany73.831671.5%
192AlbuquerqueUnited States of America (USA)73.812600.4%
193Chennai metropolitan areaIndia73.442126.0%
194WorcesterUnited States of America (USA)73.261820.4%
195LeidenNetherlands72.762987.7%
196PortlandUnited States of America (USA)72.391900.4%
197Mexico CityMexico71.4631966.0%
198PisaItaly71.273666.1%
199TallahasseeUnited States of America (USA)70.982760.4%
200CoventryUnited Kingdom (UK)70.973121.9%
Footnote
* Singapore is a city-state.
 

NutCracker

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You can make a request to the website

What is the official language of India?
Hindi and English..


Why it is funded by Beijing Municipality ??

That explains the traffic 😉. CCP little pinks might be quoting them for domestic audiance.🤔

Screenshot_20221205_085745_Brave.jpg




And thats why I could not find anything about Science cities index 2022 apart from CCP gutter piece chinadaily website. Because no one cares about this fake shit .

Screenshot_20221205_085252_Brave.jpg
 

ym888

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Hindi and English..


Why it is funded by Beijing Municipality ??😉

That explains the traffic 😉. CCP little pinks might be quoting them for domestic audiance.🤔

View attachment 184943



And thats why I could not find anything about Science cities index 2022 apart from CCP gutter piece chinadaily website. Because no one cares about this fake shit .

View attachment 184944

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