Bulava and other NEW russian ICBMs

nandu

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Russia plans four test launches of Bulava missile in June

The Russian Navy is planning to conduct at least four test launches of the Bulava ballistic missile at the end of June, a senior Navy official told RIA Novosti on Friday.
"Two Bulava launches will be carried out from the Dmitry Donskoy nuclear submarine, followed by two launches from the Yury Dolgoruky nuclear sub," the source said.
"The second test on the Yury Dolgoruky will be a salvo launch," he said.
The Yury Dolgoruky is the first of Russia's Borey class strategic nuclear submarines, which have been exclusively designed for the Bulava, and is currently undergoing sea trials.
The source said that if the tests are successful, both the submarine and the missile could be put into service with the Russian Navy by the end of 2010.
The Bulava (SS-NX-30) is a three-stage liquid and solid-propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM). It carries up to 10 MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).
The future development of Bulava has been questioned by some lawmakers and defense industry officials following a series of test failures. Only five of 12 Bulava test launches from the Dmitry Donskoy sub have been officially reported as being successful.
Some analysts suggest that in reality the number of failures was considerably larger, with Russian military expert Pavel Felgenhauer contending that of the Bulava's 12 test launches, only one was entirely successful.
But the military has insisted there is no alternative to the Bulava and said the tests of the missile would continue until it is ready to enter service with the Russian Navy.

Source:RIA Novosti
 

nandu

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Fate of Russia's Bulava missile must be decided this summer — Navy

The upcoming tests of Russia's troubled Bulava ballistic missile will determine whether it will be put in service with the Russian Navy or scrapped, a senior Navy commander said.
The Russian Navy is planning to conduct at least four test launches of the Bulava ballistic missile at the end of June.
"I believe that this summer will be decisive in terms of adopting Bulava for the service with the Navy," First Deputy of the Naval General Staff Vice Admiral Oleg Burtsev said in an interview with Ekho Moskvy radio station on Saturday.
"We will continue Bulava tests launches from Dmitry Donskoy submarine and ultimately from Borey class Yury Dolgoruky sub, which is scheduled to carry out several test launches during sea trials," Burtsev said.
The Yury Dolgoruky is the first of Russia's Borey class strategic nuclear submarines, which have been exclusively designed for the Bulava, and is currently undergoing sea trials.
The admiral confirmed that if the tests are successful, both the submarine and the missile could be put into service with the Russian Navy by the end of 2010.
The Bulava (SS-NX-30) is a three-stage liquid and solid-propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM). It carries up to 10 MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).
The future development of Bulava has been questioned by some lawmakers and defense industry officials following a series of test failures . Only five of 12 Bulava test launches from the Dmitry Donskoy sub have been officially reported as being successful.
Some analysts suggest that in reality the number of failures was considerably larger, with Russian military expert Pavel Felgenhauer contending that of the Bulava's 12 test launches, only one was entirely successful.
But the military has insisted there is no alternative to the Bulava and said the tests of the missile would continue until it is ready to enter service with the Russian Navy.
http://en.rian.ru
 

nandu

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Bulava missile designer blames industry for test failures




Yury Solomonov, the designer of the troubled Bulava ballistic missile, said that the poor state of the Russian defense industry was the main cause of the weapon's failed test launches.

Solomonov resigned from his post as general director of the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology (MITT) in July 2009 after a series of unsuccessful Bulava tests, but retained his post as general designer of the missile.

"I can say in earnest that none of the design solutions have been changed as a result of the tests. The problems occur in the links of the design-technology-production chain," Solomonov said in an interview with the Izvestia newspaper published on Tuesday.

"Sometimes [the problem] is poor-quality materials, sometimes it is the lack of necessary equipment to exclude the 'human' factor in production, sometimes it is inefficient quality control," he said.

The designer complained that the Russian industry is unable to provide Bulava manufacturers with at least 50 of the necessary components for production of the weapon. This forces designers to search for alternative solutions, seriously complicating the testing process.

The Bulava (SS-NX-30) is a three-stage liquid and solid propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM). It carries up to ten MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).

The missile has been specifically designed for Russia's new Borey class nuclear submarines.

Only five of 12 Bulava test launches from the Dmitry Donskoy sub have been officially reported as successful. The future development of Bulava has been questioned by some lawmakers and defense industry officials who suggest that the Russian Navy should keep using the more reliable Sineva SLBM.

The RSM-54 Sineva (SS-N-23 Skiff) is a liquid-propellant SLBM designed for Delta IV class submarines that can carry up to 16 missiles each.

Solomonov questioned the viability of these statements saying the two missiles were incomparable both in terms of technology and performance characteristics.

A special investigation commission is expected to announce on May 30 the official results of a probe into the Bulava failures.

The Russian military has insisted that there is no alternative to the Bulava and pledged to continue testing the missile until it is ready to be deployed with the Navy. At least four new test launches of the missile have been planned for the end of June.

Solomonov vowed in the interview to continue work on the Bulava until it shows stable performance and is ready to join Russia's nuclear triad.

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20100413/158561869.html
 

nandu

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Results of Bulava probe due May 20 - Russian Navy

A special investigation commission will announce on May 20 the official results of a probe into the latest failure of Russia's ill-fated Bulava ballistic missile, the Navy commander said on Friday.

The latest launch of the missile, which Russia hopes will be a key element of its nuclear forces, from the Dmitry Donskoy nuclear submarine in the White Sea ended in failure in early December 2009. Only five of 12 Bulava launches have been officially reported as being successful.

"The conclusions of the commission will be announced on May 20," Adm. Vladimir Vysotsky said.

He added that the Russian military had significantly improved the supervision of the missile manufacturing process because some experts had blamed inefficient quality control for being one of the main causes of the test failures.

The Bulava (SS-NX-30) is a three-stage liquid and solid-propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM). It carries up to 10 MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).

The missile has been specifically designed for Russia's new Borey class nuclear submarines.

The future development of Bulava has been questioned by some lawmakers and defense industry officials who suggest that the Russian Navy should keep using the more reliable Sineva SLBM.

The Russian military has insisted that there is no alternative to the Bulava and pledged to continue testing the missile until it is ready to be deployed with the Navy. At least four new test launches of the missile have been planned for the end of June.

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20100507/158916432.html
 

A.V.

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I hope Bulava will fail future tests as it faild last three tests.
Hope is what the world is relying on but if hope and aspirations of everyone comes true the world would cease to exist ....
happy hoping ....
 

nandu

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Russia postpones Bulava missile tests until November



Russia has postponed test launches of the troubled Bulava ballistic missile until November this year, the Russian defense minister said on Friday.

The latest launch of the missile, which Russia hopes will be a key element of its nuclear forces, from the Dmitry Donskoy nuclear submarine in the White Sea ended in failure in early December 2009. Only five of 12 Bulava launches have been officially reported as being successful.

The Russian Navy earlier planned at least four new test launches of the missile at the end of June, but defense industry experts suggested they would need to build three missiles under identical conditions to establish the causes of the failures.

"We should be ready to resume the [Bulava] tests by November, I think," Anatoly Serdyukov said during talks in Italy, which involved the defense and foreign ministers of both countries.

Serdyukov said that the problems with the missile apparently originate from the faulty assembly process.

"It all comes from the poor quality of assembly. But each failed launch has experienced different problems," the minister said, adding that only the testing of three identical missiles would allow the experts to pinpoint the cause of failures.

The Bulava (SS-NX-30) is a three-stage liquid and solid-propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM). It carries up to 10 MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).

The missile has been specifically designed for Russia's new Borey class nuclear submarines.

The future development of Bulava has been questioned by some lawmakers and defense industry officials who suggest that the Russian Navy should keep using the more reliable Sineva SLBM.

The Russian military has insisted that there is no alternative to the Bulava and pledged to continue testing the missile until it is ready to be deployed with the Navy.

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20100521/159103248.html
 

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Bulava probe results ready for Russian government review

The official results of a probe into the latest failure of Russia's ill-fated Bulava ballistic missile are ready and have been sent to the government for review, a defense industry source said on Tuesday.

The latest unsuccessful launch of the missile, which Russia hopes will be a key element of its nuclear forces, took place from the Dmitry Donskoy nuclear submarine in the White Sea in early December 2009. Only five of 12 Bulava launches have been officially reported as successful.

"The conclusions [of the investigation commission] are ready and they are on their way to the government," the source said.

Russia has postponed test launches of the troubled Bulava ballistic missile until November this year.

The Russian Navy earlier planned at least four new test launches of the missile at the end of June, but defense industry experts suggested they would need to build three missiles under identical conditions to establish the causes of the failures.

The Bulava (SS-NX-30) is a three-stage liquid and solid-propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM). It carries up to 10 MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).

The missile has been specifically designed for Russia's new Borey class nuclear submarines.

The future development of Bulava has been questioned by some lawmakers and defense industry officials who suggest that the Russian Navy should keep using the more reliable Sineva SLBM.

The Russian military has insisted that there is no alternative to the Bulava and pledged to continue testing the missile until it is ready to be deployed with the Navy.

Source
 

nandu

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Russia to test Bulava missile in 3rd quarter - top general


Russia to test Bulava missile in 3rd quarter

Russia will carry out its next test launch of the troubled Bulava ballistic missile in the third quarter of the year, a deputy defense minister said on Monday.

"In the third quarter launches will resume. The first will be from the nuclear Dmitry Donskoy submarine. From which vessel the next launch will come depends on the first launch," said Col. Gen. Dmitry Popovkin, who is also a member of the Russian General Staff.

Russia hopes the Bulava will be a key element of its nuclear forces. The missile has been specifically designed for Russia's new Borey class nuclear submarines, the first of which, the Yury Dolgoruky, is currently undergoing sea trials.

Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov said in May that Bulava test launches had been postponed until November.

Only five of 12 Bulava launches have been officially reported as being successful and late last month a special commission sent the government the results of its investigation into the latest failure, a launch from the Dmitry Donskoy in the White Sea in early December 2009.

The Russian Navy earlier planned at least four new test launches of the missile at the end of June, but defense industry experts suggested they would need to build three missiles under identical conditions to establish the causes of the failures.

The Bulava (SS-NX-30) is a three-stage liquid and solid-propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM). It carries up to 10 MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).

The future development of Bulava has been questioned by some lawmakers and defense industry officials who suggest that the Russian Navy should keep using the more reliable Sineva SLBM.

The Russian military has insisted that there is no alternative to the Bulava and pledged to continue testing the missile until it is ready to be deployed with the Navy.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20100614/159421002.html
 

nrj

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Russia postpones Bulava missile tests due to wildfire

Yes, Bulava is again postponed. This time its wildfire.....

MOSCOW (BNS): The latest test launches of Bulava ballistic missile are postponed due to raging wildfires in the central regions of Russia, a media report said.

The tests which were scheduled to be conducted from August 9th to 14th are delayed for at least two weeks.

The missile has undergone a total of 12 test-launches so far, out of which seven have resulted in failure, the report said.

The missile, being developed to form the core of Russia's nuclear triad, carries up to 10 multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle (MIRV) warheads.

Designed for deployment on Borey class nuclear-powered submarines, the three-stage solid-propellant ballistic missile has a range of over 8000 kilometers.

Source
 

Tshering22

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A.V, aren't Solid fuel ICBMs considered more modern than the liquid fuel ones? I read an article somewhere that said about solid fuels being more efficient than liquid ones.
 

nrj

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Bulava missile test launches resume by Sept. 9-12

Test launches of Russia's Bulava ballistic missile will resume between September 9 and 12, a defense industry source said on Friday.

"Everything is ready for the resumption of test launches," the source said. "I do not think there will be any postponement this time." :happy_2:

Bulava test launches were put on hold after a failed launch, from the Dmitry Donskoy nuclear submarine in the White Sea on December 9, 2009, which was caused by a defective engine nozzle.

The source also said if the launch is successful, at least another three test launched will be conducted before the end of the year.

The Bulava (SS-NX-30), a three-stage liquid and solid-propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM), has officially suffered seven failures in 12 tests.

But some analysts suggest that in reality the number of failures was considerably larger, with Russian military expert Pavel Felgenhauer suggesting that of the Bulava's 12 test launches, only one was entirely successful. :angry_10:


RIA Novosti
 

nrj

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Bulava missile: is there any alternative?

Tests of the RSM-56 (SS-NX-30) Bulava solid-propellant, submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM), now under development in Russia, are to resume in late September 2010. Of 12 test launches, only three were a complete success, and another two can be called partially successful.

Russian Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov, now in the United States, said Moscow would be forced to revise the entire Bulava SLBM production and quality-control system with another abortive launch.

An unsuccessful Bulava launch, the latest to date, was conducted on December 9, 2009. Subsequent launch deadlines were repeatedly put off. Media reports say the Bulava's manufacturer, Votkinsk, has continued to identify and eliminate various production defects.

The defense minister's statement raises the following questions:

1. What action can be taken to rectify the situation with the Bulava program with another abortive launch?

2. Does Russia have an alternative missile today?

Analysts have explained the Bulava's development problems by production defects and inadequate quality control. This situation is the result of the deplorable state of the national defense industry after the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the termination of numerous promising military programs.

After Russia resumed such programs, it faced a substantial decline in management and production ethics.

Moreover, the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology developed the Bulava missile virtually from scratch, utilizing only a few engineering solutions embodied in the Topol-M intercontinental ballistic missile (SS-27 Sickle B).

It will take a lot of time and effort to get back on track. This can be accomplished by improving production and the quality-control system, better coordinating cooperation between suppliers and contractors and making a far greater effort to solve the human-resource problems.

The entire Russian defense industry and Votkinsk in particular are hard pressed for young, skilled specialists.

As far as an alternative missile is concerned, the situation deteriorated in 2007. At that time, only one Project 955 Borei (Dolgoruky) class strategic ballistic missile submarine, the Yury Dolgoruky, was built and launched. Borei class submarines will be equipped with Bulava missiles.

Two other Borei class submarines, the Alexander Nevsky and the Vladimir Monomakh, were in the initial construction stages. During the same period, analysts discussed the possibility of equipping Project 955 submarines with liquid-propellant Sineva missiles, currently being installed on the upgraded Project 667 BDRM (Delta Class IV) submarines.

This was an attractive option, all the more so as Sineva missiles have virtually the same impressive specifications as the Trident-II (D5) SLBMs wielded by the U.S. Navy and the Royal Navy. However, the required modifications were seen as a rather costly undertaking because the somewhat larger and heavier Sineva missile requires different storage, servicing and launch conditions.

The Yury Dolgoruky, the lead Borei class submarine, has been undergoing tests for a long time. The Alexander Nevsky will be launched soon. Construction of the Vladimir Monomakh has made considerable headway. And the keel of the fourth Borei class submarine has already been laid. It would be more difficult and more expensive to refit these submarines for the Sineva.

There is only one alternative: The Bulava design should be upgraded, so as to facilitate sustained production runs and sufficient reliability. This is what Serdyukov probably had in mind while noting the possibility of overhauling the Bulava production and quality-control systems.

It is still unclear what organizational measures will be implemented if, God forbid, the upcoming launch ends in failure. Quite possibly, the main developer, namely, the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology, would be replaced in favor of the State Rocket Center "Academician Makeyev Design Bureau" which has developed the overwhelming majority of Soviet and Russian SLBMs, including the Bark solid-propellant missile. The latter program was terminated by government decision in favor of the Bulava.

Although it is now impossible to install Bark missiles aboard Project 955 submarines and to resume production of such missiles, the Makeyev Design Bureau's rich SLBM-development experience should prove useful.

Specific deadlines for commissioning the Bulava missile remain unclear. As a result, the Russian Navy is forced to extend the service life of Soviet-era missiles. On August 23, 2010, the K-51 Verkhoturye nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, the lead submarine of the Project 667 BDRM program, arrived at the Zvyozdochka Ship Repair Center in Severodvinsk, northern Russia, for a thorough refitting.

Launched in 1984 and upgraded in the late 1990s, the Verkhoturye and her sister submarine, the Yekaterinburg, were to have been scrapped within the next three-four years. However, they will now be fitted with Sineva missiles and other modern equipment on a par with four other Project 667 submarines.
 

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Test launches of Russia's troubled Bulava missile to be held Thursday | Defense | RIA Novosti



Test launches of Russia's troubled Bulava ballistic missile will be held in the White Sea by the end of the week, a source in the administration of the northern Russian town of Severodvinsk said.

"The launch of the missile is expected at the end of the week, most likely on Thursday," the source said.

The missile will be launched from Russia's Dmitry Donskoy nuclear submarine.

Bulava test launches were put on hold after a failed launch on December 9, 2009, which was caused by a defective engine nozzle.

The Bulava (SS-NX-30), a three-stage liquid and solid-propellant submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM), has officially suffered seven failures in 12 tests.

But some analysts think that in reality the number of failures is considerably higher, with only one of Bulava's 12 test launches being entirely successful.



MOSCOW, October 6 (RIA Novosti)
 

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Russia's Bulava missile test successful: Reports

MOSCOW (BNS): The 13th test launch of Russia's Bulava intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) has been carried out successfully, the state media reported Thursday.

The ICBM's test warhead "successfully hit its target on the Kura test range in Russia's Far East Kamchatka region," the Russian Defense Ministry said on Thursday as reported by RIA Novosti.



It did not specify the target which the missile destroyed.

The Itar-Tass news agency also reported a successful launch of the Bulava missile. "Reentry vehicles successfully reached the Kura firing range on the Kamchatka Peninsula," it said, quoting the Defence Ministry press-service and information directorate.

The missile was test fired from the Dmitry Donskoy nuclear submarine in the White Sea.

Russia had put on hold all tests of the three-stage solid-propellant ballistic missile system after the weapon failed during its last launch in December last year.

The ICBM has a range of over 8,000 kilometers and is designed to be installed on the Russian Navy's new Borey class nuclear-powered submarines.





Russia's Bulava missile test successful: Reports :: Brahmand.com
 

nrj

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Russian govt. to decide on Bulava missile's fate

The decision to put Russia's Bulava submarine-launched ballistic missile into service will be made by the country's leadership and only after the test program is complete, a government source said on Friday.

"After the three test launches planned for 2010, another series of tests will follow in the first half of 2011. A decision on the fate of the missile will only be made after that," the source said.

"The final decision on putting the missile into service will be made by the country's leadership, based on a report by the defense minister," the source added.

Russian Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov, who oversees the country's defense industry, said another six successful test launches were needed for the missile to be put into operation, including one launch from a new submarine.

A Bulava missile was successfully test fired earlier on Friday from a submarine in the White Sea, reportedly hitting a target on the Kura test range in Russia's Far East Kamchatka region some 6,000 kilometers to the east.

It is the second successful firing in a month, coming after a series of embarrassing failures. Only 5 of the previous 12 launches were officially declared successful, although some military experts say that many of those were also flawed.

Previous failures were officially blamed on manufacturing faults.

The Russian military expects the Bulava, along with Topol-M land-based ballistic missiles, to become the core of Russia's nuclear triad.

The Bulava (SS-NX-30) SLBM carries up to 10 MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles). The three-stage ballistic missile is designed for deployment on Borey-class nuclear submarines.

Bulava missile test failures caused by assembly problems

The second successful test launch in a row of a Bulava submarine-launched ballistic missile has proved that poor assembly technology is likely to be the reason for the previous failed tests, a source from the state commission probing earlier failures said.

A Bulava submarine-launched ballistic missile hit its target on the Kura test range in Russia's Far East Kamchatka region, the Russian Defense Ministry said on Friday.

This was the 14th test launch of the Bulava missile. Seven of the previous test launches failed for various technical reasons.

Three examples of the troubled Bulava missile were built in order to establish the reasons for the failures of previous Bulava test launches.

"Therefore, we can draw the preliminary conclusion that the test launches failed because of the [missile's] assembly technology," the source said, adding that final conclusion will be made after one more test launch which is set for the year end.

"Immediately after the Dmitry Donskoy submarine [which conducted the last test launch] returns to its base, the commission will examine the data from the 14th launch and will schedule the date of the next, 15th, launch," the source said.

"This will be the last test launch in 2010."

The ballistic missile will enter service when it is 100% reliable, Deputy Defense Minister Vladimir Popovkin said.
 

pmaitra

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Personally i have found the MAZ TEL better looking and more Badass than the Ashok leyland Hippo trailer we use for the Agni:D
Damn that truck looks butch we should get some for the road mobile canister version of the A3.
Absolutely, I think the MAZ (Minsky Avtomobilny Zavod) make some of the most intimidating lorries ever. Especially, the MAZ-7912/MAZ-7917 meant for the Topol is virtually a bunker-cum-missile-base on wheels!

I wonder whether Ural India will ever think of collaborating with MAZ and also KrAZ to bring some of their manufacturing lines to India.
 
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nrj

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Russia to test five Bulava missiles in 2011

Russian strategic forces will conduct up to five test launches of a new Bulava inter-continental ballistic missile (ICBM), the missile's chief designer Yuri Solomonov told RIA Novosti on Monday.

Only seven tests of the submarine-based Bulava have been successful. Despite of that, Bulava has been in mass production for three years yet, Solomonov said. ( He added that plant's capacity allows to increase the Bulava production by several times after the missile submarine carrier Yuri Dolgoruki is operational. That will not happen until at least summer 2011, Solomonov stressed.

No changes have been done in the missile's design after the failed tests, he added

Meanwhile, Solomonov also committed that the development of new ICBMs contradicted the global trend for arms reduction.

Russian rearmament program envisages deployment of 50 new Topol-M and Yars multiple-warhead ICBMs by 2012 and building a new heavy ballistic missile before 2020 to replace Soviet-made RS-18 and RS-20.

Source
 

nrj

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Russia ready to equip 1st Borey class sub with Bulava missiles

A missile production plant in southern Siberia has produced enough Bulava ballistic missiles to complete its tests and arm the first Borey class strategic submarine, Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov said on Monday.

"A batch of missiles sufficient to finish the tests and equip one submarine has been produced already. Larger production would cause the missiles to stock up," Ivanov said after a meeting of defense industry officials in the southern Siberian republic of Udmurtia.


The Bulava (SS-NX-30) submarine-launched ballistic missile carries up to 10 MIRV warheads and has a range of over 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).

Despite several previous failures, officially blamed on manufacturing defaults, the Russian military has insisted that there is no alternative to the Bulava and pledged to continue testing the missile until it is ready for service with the Navy.

Russia is planning to conduct at least four Bulava test launches this year and deploy it on the new Borey class strategic submarines.

The tests launches will most likely be conducted from the Yury Dolgoruky.

The Yury Dolgoruky, which has recently completed sea trials in the White Sea, is expected to enter service with the Russian Navy in the near future, pending the outcome of the Bulava testing.

Three other Borey class nuclear submarines, the Alexander Nevsky, the Vladimir Monomakh, and Svyatitel Nikolai (St. Nicholas) are in different stages of completion. Russia is planning to build eight of these subs by 2015.

Source
 
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