'Aiyoh' now in the Oxford English Dictionary

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'Aiyoh' now in the Oxford English Dictionary
A dictionary for advanced learners from the Oxford University Press, which publishes the Oxford English Dictionary, 'the definitive record of the English language.'
NEW DELHI: Aiyoh! What has the Oxford English Dictionary gone and done now? In its September list of new words, it included entries such as scrumdiddlyumptious (delicious) and yogasana (no explanation needed, one hopes), but also - well, 'aiyoh' and 'aiyah.'

Speakers of South Indian languages who have never uttered 'aiyoh' have probably had very uneventful lives. It's one of the most affectively versatile words in the Dravidian lexicon, capable of expressing - in Tamil alone - a suite of emotions including consternation ("Aiyoh! Why is he wearing that shirt again?"), shock ("Aiyoh! Are you sure he has passed away?") and - with a slight modification - apprehension ("Ai-yi-yoh..I'm sure my boss is going to fire me for this!").
"Aiyah" is another such interjection used by speakers of South Indian languages. The expression differs phonetically from "Ayya," which is an honorific.

The Oxford English Dictionary, or the OED, is 150 years old, has up to 600,000 entries, and its publisher - the Oxford University Press - calls it the 'definitive record of the English language.' For purists who swear by it, if a word isn't in the dictionary, it isn't English. Well, bilingual English-lovers who are also well-versed in South Indian languages no longer have to wince when they hear someone inteject, "Aiyoh!" during an exhange in the Queen's English!

http://m.timesofindia.com/india/Aiyoh-now-in-the-Oxford-English-Dictionary/articleshow/54731362.cms
 

Akask kumar

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Akask kumar

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I guess next substances would be “Idli” and “dosa” meanings in Oxford English Dictionary? :p
a paki brain cant think any good out of this,,no matter ur country and mind is doomed..
This inclusion of word signifies the popularity,impact south Indian guies have in western countries ..
Rasgulla is already in it.. and i bet they have "Jihad " too included .. which signifies ur contribution to the world..
 

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I guess next substances would be “Idli” and “dosa” meanings in Oxford English Dictionary? :p
No, the next will be the dictionaries if Hindi and other Indian Languages in UN dictionary. Along with English, French, Arabian and Chinese; very soon Hindi too will be an official language of United Nations.:first:
 

Akask kumar

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Aiya and Aiyo are Chinese exclamations, usually of surprise, or sometimes disappointment, or regret subject to situations.
wow!! i never thought there is any connection between chinese lang and indian lang.. i use to think the lang in these two countries evolved independently...

i bet trade has to do with this similarity ..
 

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Aiya and Aiyo are Chinese exclamations, usually of surprise, or sometimes disappointment, or regret subject to situations.
Interesting.

Here's another one I noticed: 'ni' means "you" in Tamil/Malayalam (probably in Telugu and Kannada too; ie in the Dravidian languages), just like in many of the Chinese languages.
 

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Aiya and Aiyo are Chinese exclamations, usually of surprise, or sometimes disappointment, or regret subject to situations.
It is quite possible that these words spread from India to China during ancient or medieval period because
of trade. For example the Chola Dynasty established intensive trade relations with the Song Dynasty of China
in the 11th century
 

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It is quite possible that these words spread from India to China during ancient or medieval period because
of trade. For example the Chola Dynasty established intensive trade relations with the Song Dynasty of China
in the 11th century
Sure trade was there between South part of Indian subcontinent and various parts of the world, east & west, but I don't think these words have spread through trade. Words spread through trade are usually product-specific words.
Most probably the above two examples developed independently and sound the same by coincidence. Less likely option is that they are remnants of an early proto-language (several thousand years back.)
 

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