After N-tangle, AQ in plagiarism row

Flint

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After N-tangle, AQ in plagiarism row

Chidanand Rajghatta, TNN 26 August 2009, 12:20am IST

WASHINGTON: A Pakistani doctoral candidate in the United States has exposed a stark case of plagiarism by Pakistan’s nuclear luminary AQ Khan,
much to the dismay of the controversial man’s hero-worshipping fans and the mirth of his critics.

While Pakistan is still coming to grips with the re-assessment in India of that country’s founding father Mohammed Ali Jinnah, there also appears to be an ongoing re-appraisal of Khan, widely known as the “father” of the country’s nuclear weapons.

It seems that Khan, who is accused of basically stealing centrifuge designs from Europe to kickstart Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program, cannot produce any original work, and that includes writing a simple op-ed article.

A recent op-ed by Khan on the “Science of computers” in Islamabad’s the News from the Jang group contained copious passages plagiarized from university prospectus and school curricula freely available on the internet, writes Fahad Rafique Dogar, a PhD student at Carnegie Mellon University. Dogar has reproduced at least four such instances of plagiarism by Khan by citing the original texts in a letter to the editors, which has gone unchallenged by Pakistan’s nuclear “hero” and the newspaper.

Khan began writing a regular newspaper column in November 2008 when he was released from house arrest after being nominally incarcerated by Pakistan’s military regime for proliferating nuclear weapons technology.

Many of the columns, seen by critics as utterly banal and trite, are devoted to self-promotion and criticizing others, as Khan pontificates about the state of scientific research in Pakistan.

But Khan’s own reputation has been in question in many scientific quarters (including in Pakistan) where it is believed that he is nothing more than a huckster who stole centrifuge designs from Urenco, a European company he worked for, while presenting himself as a “scientist”, when in fact, he is a metallurgist who has no original work to his credit. There are no pioneering scientific papers by Khan in his domain and he is seldom cited in any research.

The latest instance of “intellectual theft” has stirred Pakistani passions in the cyberworld, where critics and supporters of the man have clashed. Khan’s supporters argued that Khan had credited an acolyte who had given him the material lifted from the curricula and therefore could not be accused of plagiarism.
 

Flint

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:D Trust Chidananad Rajghatta to bring us the juiciest stuff lol.
 

Daredevil

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The original article in the news about his plagiarism. From 'Photo chor' to 'article chor', truly amazing :rofl:


Careless neglect?

Monday, August 24, 2009
This is with reference to Dr A Q Khan’s column “Science of computers — part I” which appeared in your pages on Aug 19.

1. Dr Khan writes: “The computer is an essential part of 21st century life. Computer science is a fast-moving subject that gives rise to a range of interesting and often challenging problems. The implementation of today’s complex computer systems requires the skills of a knowledgeable and versatile computer scientist. Artificial intelligence — the study of intelligent behaviour — is having an increasing reference on computer system design. Distributed systems, networks and the internet are now central to the study of computing, presenting both technical and social challenges.”

Now compare this to the first paragraph of Undergraduate Prospectus 2009, University of Sussex(www.sussex.ac.uk/units/publications/ugrad2009/subjects/computing):

“Computing is an essential part of 21st-century life, and is an exceptionally fast-moving subject that gives rise to a range of interesting and challenging problems. The implementation of today’s complex computing systems, networks and multimedia systems requires the skills of knowledgeable and versatile computer scientists. Computer networks and the internet are now central to the study of computing and information technology, presenting both technical and social challenges. Artificial intelligence (AI) — the study of intelligent behaviour — is having an increasing influence on computer system design.”

2. Dr Khan writes: “How do we understand, reason, plan, cooperate, converse, read and communicate? What are the roles of language and logic? What is the structure of the brain? How does vision work? These are all questions as fundamental as the sub-atomic structure of matter. These are also questions where the science of computing plays an important role in our attempts to provide answers. The computer scientist can expect to come face-to-face with problems of great depth and complexity and, together with scientists, engineers and experts in other fields, may help to solve them. Computing is not just about the big questions; it is also about engineering-making things work. Computing is unique in offering both the challenge of science and the satisfaction of engineering.”

Now compare this to the first paragraph of Imperial College London website (www3.imperial.ac.uk/engineering/teaching/exploringengineering/computing): “How do we understand, reason, plan, cooperate, converse, read and communicate? What are the roles of language and logic? What is the structure of the brain? How does vision work? These are questions as fundamental, in their own way, as questions about the sub-atomic structure of matter. They are also questions where the science of computing plays an important role in our attempts to provide answers. The computer scientist can expect to come face-to-face with problems of great depth and complexity and, together with scientists, engineers and experts in other fields, may help to disentangle them. But computing is not just about the big questions it is also about engineering-making things work. Computing is unique in offering both the challenge of a science and the satisfaction of engineering.”

3. Furthermore, Dr Khan writes: “Computer science is an inter-disciplinary subject. It is firmly rooted in engineering and mathematics, with links to linguistics, psychology and other fields. Computer science is concerned with constructing hardware and software systems, digital electronics, compiler design, programming languages, operation systems, networks and graphics. Theoretical computer science addresses fundamental issues: the motion of computable function, proving the correctness of hardware and software and the theory of communicating system.

Again the University of Cambridge website (Undergraduate Admissions: Computer Science) contains the following text: (First paragraph) “Computer science is interdisciplinary. It is firmly rooted in engineering and mathematics, with links to linguistics, psychology and other fields. [...] (Second paragraph) Practical computer science is concerned with constructing hardware and software systems: digital electronics, compiler design, programming languages, operating systems, networks and graphics. Theoretical computer science addresses fundamental issues: the notion of computable function, proving the correctness of hardware and software, the theory of communicating systems.”

4. The second half of Dr Khan’s article (paragraph 7 onwards) can be found in ACM’s Computing Curricula 2009. Although he credits ACM but doesn’t clarify that he is directly copying sentences from a document. Also, in the beginning of his piece he does acknowledge one of his former colleagues, an Engineer Nasim Khan, for input for the article — however, it is not clear whether this input is the reason for the apparent plagiarism.

Fahad Rafique Dogar

PhD student, Carnegie Mellon University

Pittsburgh, PA, US
 

Pintu

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Totally shameless act :( , I think only some words were changed , I meant no offence to anybody , but that can not be tolerated.

Regards
 

1.44

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Well is suppose being called a plagiarist is a step down from 'Merchant of Menace'
 

Daredevil

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I highly doubt his skills as nuclear scientist. I wonder if he was even capable of doing such highly sophisticated things. And Pakistan treats him as a National Hero, he should be a National shame.
 

kuku

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Photochor strikes again.....
 

F-14

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a dogs tail shall not be stright even if it is put in a pipe for a 1000 years it will only remain staright till it is in the pipe
 

hit&run

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Who, to patch up his fame--or fill his purse-- Still pilfers wretched plans, and makes them worse; Like gypsies, lest the stolen brat be known, Defacing first, then claiming for his own.
Charles Churchill
 

Daredevil

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This article is continuation to the first article he plagiarised. But this time he mentions "(The information in this article is based on the available syllabuses of famous British universities.)" :rofl: :rofl:
Though he says he copy-pasted from syllabuses of British universities, a lot of them are actually from US websites. :blum3: :D

What kind of nuclear scientist he is? :blum3:

Part II Random thoughts

Wednesday, August 26, 2009
Dr A Q Khan

In Part I last week on the importance of computer technology I discussed the subject in general and gave a few useful related web sites. In this second part I would like to discuss artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, the professional scope for computer engineers and what is expected professionally from them. In addition to the disciplines mentioned in Part I, emerging technologies, applications and curriculum recommendations have appeared, which need to be mentioned as well.

1. Artificial intelligence (AI): The subfield of computer science that is concerned with understanding the nature of intelligent action and making computer machines, especially intelligent computer programmes, capable of such action is known as artificial intelligence. It can also be described as the performance by computer systems of a task that normally requires human intelligence, such as visual perception or decision-making. (From Answers.com):D

Artificial intelligence combines computing with psychology, linguistics and philosophy. It is concerned with the design of intelligent computer systems and the study of intelligence in both people and machines. Using artificial intelligence techniques, computers are being programmed to do things previously done only by people. Artificial intelligence systems are already in use for such tasks as fault diagnosis, mineral prospecting and language translation and are not confined to methods that are biologically observable. (From Univeristy of Washington):D

The main emphasis of computer science and artificial intelligence studies is on the principles and practice of software design. Distinctive features include human-centred computer systems, foundations of concurrent systems, networking and distributing systems, vision, national language processing, neural networks and artificial life. These study programmes are supported by powerful computing facilities running a wide range of software. The Stanford University website: http://www-formal.standford.edu/ jmc/whatisai/whatisai/html provides a description and applications of AI.

2. Bioinformatics: Bioinformatics is the application of computer technology to the management of biological information. More information on this can be found on websites like Bioinformatics courses, bioinformatics course, bioinformatics program .

Some universities have added other subjects, like accounting, finance and law to their computer science curriculum.

Computer science and engineering graduates have perhaps the largest spectrum of jobs to select from. Computer architecture, computer-aided design and manufacturing of VLSI/ULSI circuits, intelligent robotic systems, computer-based control systems, telecommunications and computer networking, wireless communication systems, signal and information processing and multimedia systems, solid-state physics and devices, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), electromagnetic and electromechanical systems, data-storage systems, data mining, embedded systems, distributed computing, mobile computing, real-time software, digital signal processing, optical data processing, banking, insurance, healthcare and multinationals, to name but a few common careers. (From Carnegie-Mellon University):D

After having followed a good university course in any discipline of computer science and engineering, graduates are normally expected to have learnt two types of skills:

Technical computing skills: Problem-solving ability, recognising levels of abstraction in software, hardware systems and multimedia. Practical skills such as building and using database management systems and other sophisticated software tools. Programming: using existing software libraries to carry out a variety of computing tasks, such as creating a user interface. Being aware of the uses to which computers are put, recognising issues to do with security and safety. Looking at innovative ways of using computers, creating tools, providing tools support, etc. (Association of Computing Maachinery):D

General professional skills: Communicating in writing, giving effective presentations and product demonstrations and being a good negotiator (both in traditional environments and electronically). Preparing for a job search; this involves building an impressive curriculum vitae and basing this confidently on technical and other skills. In addition, depending on interests, specialised domain knowledge such as business, medicine and biology will be acquired. Being an effective team member. Understanding the special requirements of a globally distributed project with participants from multiple cultures. Recognising the challenges and opportunities of keeping skills up-to-date and understanding how to do so. Knowledge of fundamental principles and their applications to develop software-based solutions. The ability to apply and implement appropriate theories and techniques to the design and development of computer systems and to use correct criteria and tools for the planning, development, testing and evaluation of software systems. The ability to recognise the capabilities and limitations of computer-based solutions as well as sources of risk. I still vividly remember the large, room-sized configuration of the IBM computer system, which used big stacks of punch cards that had been installed in Sweden at the Oxelosund Steel Mills, which I visited as a graduate student. It was the most modern steel plant in the world at the time, using the newly developed Kaldo Process for the purification of steel (reducing its carbon content). We were visiting educational and industrial institutions in Sweden in July 1964 as a delegation from the Technological University of Delft, Holland. Sweden was a beautiful, clean country – cleaner than any I had seen anywhere before. The people were extremely polite, hospitable and disciplined. At that time Holland was known as the cleanest country, of which the Germans never hesitated to inform me when I praised their cleanliness. They did have a point and I was duly impressed by what I later found in Holland. However, after seeing Sweden, I had to admit that their country was even cleaner.

We visited the Royal Institute of Technology, Uppsala University, Volvo, Husquarna, Scania Vabis, Oxelosund and Sandvik Steel Mills, etc. It was our first exposure to an operational computer system. The IBM computer configuration was the first of its kind and was installed and operated by the Americans for the automatic control of the steel mills. Nowadays a very small unit is more powerful and more efficient than that huge configuration was.

About 25 years after that memorable visit I heard the shocking news that the Prime Minister of Sweden, Mr Olof Palme, had been brutally shot down while walking back to his residence after seeing a film. How could anyone be so callous as to murder such a good human being, a pacifist, was beyond my comprehension. I wrote an obituary in a local English daily and was pleasantly surprised to receive a letter of thanks from Mrs Palme through their embassy in Islamabad.

I was lucky to have a team of experts in theoretical computation (Computational Fluid Dynamics, etc.), computer systems engineering (Control and Automation, etc.), complex process technology (fault-free running of the enrichment plant) and maintenance of these complex systems (hardware engineering) headed by Dr M Alam, Nasim Khan, Dr M Ashraf Atta and Brig. Rafiuddin, respectively. They, together with their other competent and able colleagues, managed to solve all the problems related to the centrifuge plant and the manufacture of nuclear devices and ballistic missiles.

(The information in this article is based on the available syllabuses of famous British universities.)
 

F-14

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can some one please take this baffon the so called "Father" of the Bomb in pakistan
to a mental hospital
 

Yusuf

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Come on guys. He just did what he has been doing all his life. steal!!!!
What else do you expect from him?
 

Vinod2070

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I always thought he was a fan of PARC (Palo Alto Research Center, Xerox corp, California).

Turns out, he also likes Microsoft corp., Redmond, Washington for the ctrl+C and ctrl+V functionality.
 

EnlightenedMonk

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I'm not surprised by this at all...

Given this bloke's habit of plagiarism, Pakistan's nuclear bomb might also be a plagiarised one :D:D:D
 

Flint

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Well to be fair, he did somewhat credit his sources at the end of the articles. However, that doesn't excuse the fact that this so-called scientist can't write a few paragraphs from his own head without resorting to copy-paste.
 

RPK

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BBC NEWS | South Asia | Curbs on nuclear scientist lifted

A court in Pakistan has lifted the final restrictions on controversial nuclear scientist Dr Abdul Qadeer Khan, allowing him total freedom of movement.

Dr Khan, whose work helped Pakistan become a nuclear state, spent years under house arrest after he admitted selling off nuclear weapons secrets.

In February 2009 most restrictions on him were lifted, but he still had to notify authorities of his movements.

He subsequently filed a petition arguing for further freedoms.

Dr Khan confessed to transferring nuclear weapons technology to Libya, North Korea and Iran in 2004 but was later pardoned by former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf.

He has since said that the charges against him were false and that his confession was "forced".

The BBC's Syed Shoaib Hasan in Islamabad says that despite his confession and detention, Dr Khan remains very popular among many Pakistanis who regard him as a national hero.

But the "father of Pakistan's nuclear bomb" was placed under house arrest and not allowed to meet anyone.

This included US and IAEA experts who wanted to investigate the extent of his proliferation activities, our correspondent says.

The US has repeatedly said it wants to question Dr Khan, but Pakistan has always refused access.

'No limitations'

"Dr Khan can come and go anywhere as he pleases, and no one should prevent him from doing this," Justice Ejaz Ahmed, the presiding judge at Lahore high court, said in his remarks in court.

"We must implement the Islamabad high court's decision in spirit and letter.

"There should be no limitations on Dr Khan's movements and meetings."


I continue to be a prisoner despite having been released on court orders

AQ Khan


Profile: AQ Khan
In his petition to Lahore's high court, Dr Khan argued, "I continue to be a prisoner despite having been released on court orders.

"The government has used the judgement of the Islamabad high court by limiting my movement under the guise of providing me security," he said.

The Lahore court is the highest judicial body of Pakistan's Punjab province.

It is not clear whether the authorities will heed the court's decision
 

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