Afghan reality: India may talk to ISI, Taliban

DaRk WaVe

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Baradar was always talking to ISI. I heard he had a hotline to the ISI headquarters. ;)
Hotline was over years ago, This time we showed him some of his 'virgins' in ISI HQs
 
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ajtr

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Pakistan has arrested only the quetta shura members till now and they had laid off their hands from haqqani clan.Its the haqqani clan whom pakistan will project as good taliban for talks(it seems so till now)
 

DaRk WaVe

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Pakistan has arrested only the quetta shura members till now and they had laid off their hands from haqqani clan.Its the haqqani clan whom pakistan will project as good taliban for talks(it seems so till now)
you need to think again because Assassins are patrolling in the sky & their Hell Fires are sending many to hell ;)
may be you missed


Haqqani’s son killed in Waziristan drone strike

MIRANSHAH: A son of al-Qaeda-linked warlord Sirajuddin Haqqani, whose network is fighting in Afghanistan, has been killed in a US missile attack in Pakistan, officials said on Friday.

The death of Mohammed Haqqani, who was involved in the Afghan network, in an attack thought to have been targeting his father will be a symbolic blow to the Haqqani leadership and a further boost for the controversial US drone war.

He died when a US plane fired two missiles into a compound and vehicle on Thursday in the Dandey Darpa Khel area of North Waziristan, a Haqqani bastion in the lawless tribal belt on the Afghan border, a Pakistani official said.

His father Sirajuddin now commands the Haqqani network, which is affiliated to the Afghan Taliban and al-Qaeda, taking over from his elderly father, the well-known Soviet resistance commander Jalaluddin Haqqani.

“Mohammed Haqqani, son of Jalaluddin Haqqani, was killed in yesterday’s attack along with two foreign operatives and a local tribesman,” the senior Pakistani security official told AFP on condition of anonymity.

“Mohammed was not actively involved in the movement but his place was used as a hideout for Arab foreign militants,” the official added.

A source affiliated to the Haqqani network said only that: “yesterday the attack targeted the family of Jalaluddin Haqqani”.

Haqqani was killed one day after Pakistan confirmed the arrest of Afghan Taliban second-in-command Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, which analysts said could signal a new phase in Islamabad’s often-prickly relationship with the US.

The third son of Jalaluddin, Mohammad was a bearded young man in his late 20s, said an AFP reporter who met him earlier.

Another Pakistani intelligence official confirmed he was fatally wounded in Thursday’s drone strike.

Two other Afghans attached to the Haqqani network were also killed in the same attack, a local intelligence official said.

“It is a big loss for the family and for the Taliban. We will take revenge for his death on US and Nato forces in Afghanistan,” said a Taliban activist who gave his name as Nek Daraz in Miranshah, the capital of North Waziristan.

Officials in Washington have hailed the drone campaign for eliminating a number of high-value targets in terrain classified as an intelligence black hole and which Al-Qaeda has turned into its global headquarters.

DAWN.COM | Pakistan | Haqqani?s son killed in Waziristan drone strike
any ways good night
 
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Armand2REP

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for now future seems dark for taliban & presence of India in Afghanistan ;)
The attacks of Taliban against India have only embolden India to send more security. Now there will be more Indian troops in Afghanistan than ever. I call that a failure for Pakistani goals of expelling India.
 

ajtr

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WHAT NEXT IN PAKISTAN'S PASHTUN BELT?

INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM MONITOR---PAPER NO.625

B.RAMAN


The Pakistan Army and the US intelligence are making headway in the battle against jihadi terrorism --- the indigenous as well as the global varieties--- in Pakistan's Pashtun tribal belt in the Malakand Division of the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) and the Federally-Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).


2. They are working in tandem in some places such as the Swat Valley of the Malakand Division and South Waziristan in the FATA and separately of each other in co-ordinated, but not joint operations in other areas such as the Bajaur and the North Waziristan Agencies of the FATA. While the Pakistan Army has been exclusively handling the ground situation in the Bajaur Agency with very little US involvement, the US has been keeping up relentless pressure on the terrorists in North Waziristan and occasionally in South Waziristan through its Drone (pilotless planes) strikes.


3.There is a gentlemen's agreement between Islamabad and Washington that the former will keep making proforma protests against the Drone strikes without trying to stop them. If Pakistan protests really and vehemently, the US will have to stop them. The US is able to continue them because the Pakistani protests are a charade. Pakistan knows it is benefiting from the Drone strikes and wants them to continue. Fears that disproportionate civilian casualties might add to anti-American feelings have been belied. Civilian casualties there have been, but they are not as heavy as made out by some US analysts. Even the Pakistani civil society and the local tribal population no longer protest against the civilian casualties. They have realised that by eliminating the jihadi terrorist leaders of not only Al Qaeda, but also indigenous organisations such as the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and the anti-Shia Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LEJ) and trans-border organisations such as the anti-Chinese Islamic Movement of East Turkestan (IMET) the US has given them some relief from the intimidation and terror imposed on the local population by these terrorist groups.


4. There are signs of a jihadi fatigue in the Pakistani Pashtun belt. This fatigue should account for the remarkable decline in public protests over the Drone strikes. It has also contributed to the increasing flow of valuable intelligence to the US agencies. Almost all the successful US Drone strikes were intelligence-driven. Initially, the intelligence came overwhelmingly from technical sources. Now, they are coming more and more from human sources. When there is popular fatigue with the terrorists, intelligence flow improves. We are witnessing this in the tribal belt.


5. The remarkable successes of the US intelligence in North Waziristan have been accompanied by the headway made by the Pakistani security forces in the Swat Valley, South Waziristan and the Bajaur Agency. These operations cannot be described as successful in terms of identified terrorist leaders neutralised by the Pakistan Army. Many of the terrorist leaders operating in these areas have escaped capture by the Pakistan Army. Their trained followers have dispersed and peeled off. They have retained a capability for re-grouping and striking back at a later stage if the Army pressure eases.


6. Despite this, the Pakistan Army operations have been successful in the sense that it has been able to re-establish territorial control over Swat, South Waziristan and the Bajaur Agency and deny the use of this territory to the terrorists. Is this territorial control ephemeral or will it be enduring? The training and equipment given by the US to Pakistani para-military forces such as the Frontier Corps have improved their morale and made them fight better to wrest control of the territory from the terrorists, but their ability to hold on to the "newly liberated" territory in the face of a renewed assault is yet to be tested.


7. Any comprehensive operation in this area has to have three components---liberate, hold on to it and develop. Only the first component is now being attempted by the Army with US assistance. US policy-makers and Pakistani civilian leaders are yet to pay attention to the other two components. Holding on to the "liberated" territory demands massive investments for a crash development of roads and other means of communications. One sees no signs of any such investments and related activity. It also demands a robust civilian governing machinery which enforces the civilian authority, brings the liberated areas into the national political mainstream from which the entire FATA had remained excluded ever since Pakistan became independent in 1947 and undertakes massive economic development programmes.


8. The elected civilian Government in Islamabad has shown very little interest in the civilian follow-up to the military actions. It has left all the initiatives in the FATA in the hands of the Army. There is hardly any thinking or discussion in Islamabad or the rest of the country on how to increase the extent and effectiveness of the civilian governing machinery in the tribal belt. The civilian leaders have no interest in the tasks of governance in the tribal areas. Even US policy-makers and experts have shown not much inteterest in following up on the military successes by undertaking a programme for changing the political and economic landscape of the tribal areas.


9. This total lack of interest in "what next" could facilitate re-grouping and a come-back by the terrorists and insurgents.
 

ajtr

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Pakistan's push for new role in Afghanistan

Afghanistan's punishing war is entering a new phase and Pakistan has made it clear it can and must play a leading role.
The sudden significant capture of Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, second in charge in the Taliban hierarchy, comes at a crucial point.
Talk of negotiation is now taking centre stage, a strategy in parallel to a powerful military assault against Taliban strongholds in southern Afghanistan.
"There has been a change in Pakistan's attitude," said Pakistani author Ahmed Rashid, who has written extensively about the close links between Pakistan's military intelligence, the ISI, and Taliban leaders.
"Pakistan now wants to dominate any kind of dialogue that takes place."
Frustration
Mullah Baradar, reported to have been picked up by Pakistani and US intelligence agents in the southern Pakistani city of Karachi, may have become too independent.


America is history, Karzai is history, the Taliban are the future
Former ISI head Gen Hamid Gul
Sources in Kabul say he and his envoys have been involved in secret talks with the Afghan president in Kabul, his representatives in southern Afghanistan and outside the country.
One senior Afghan official who, like others, is not commenting publicly for now, said: "This may be good for public opinion but, for us, it can have a negative impact.
"It was easier for us to talk to him."
A Western source involved in the process expressed frustration this channel was now being exposed and, for the moment, stopped.
More arrests have now been reported including two Taliban "shadow governors" who reported to Mullah Baradar.
Reports from Kandahar last month speculated that Mullah Baradar would soon be arrested because of growing tensions with Mullah Omar.
The two men have been close confidants. The Taliban leader had appointed him as one of his two main deputies after the movement was ousted from power in 2001.
Mullah Baradar rose to become the key military commander as Mullah Omar found it increasingly difficult to operate in the open.
"Pakistan has accomplished two objectives," remarked Lt Col Tony Shaffer, who served as an intelligence officer in Afghanistan in 2003, and is now at the Center for Advanced Defense Studies in Washington.
"They've shown us in the West they're willing to co-operate and they've taken out someone they didn't control."
Pakistan has always denied senior Taliban leaders are living on its soil, saying they go back and forth across the porous border with Afghanistan.
Key asset
Unlike the Bush administration, Barack Obama's team has been urging Pakistan, privately and publicly, to take action against the Taliban leadership and their sanctuaries in the tribal areas, as well as in cities like Quetta and Karachi.

Mullah Omar was reported to be at loggerheads with Mullah Baradar
Since 2001 the Pakistan military has moved against al-Qaeda and more recently, Pakistani Taliban leaders. But it's long made it clear it won't move against the Afghan Taliban and other powerful Afghan commanders linked to the insurgency.
Islamabad has regarded its long-standing Taliban connections as a key asset in neighbouring Afghanistan.
Now that the Afghan government and its Nato allies have made reintegration of low-level Taliban fighters - and reconciliation with more senior commanders - a key priority, Pakistan wants to play a role in bringing the Taliban to the negotiating table.
Pakistan's army chief, Gen Ashfaq Kayani, has been indicating their readiness.
Sphere of influence
In a rare press briefing in February, he made it clear "we have opened all doors" to co-operation with Nato and Afghan forces in Afghanistan.
But he also asserted "our strategic paradigm has to be realised". For Pakistan, this means a friendly Afghanistan that is part of its sphere of influence - and where India, still regarded as a threat, plays no major role.
Washington seems to accept Pakistan can be a broker.
US Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Holbrooke, on a visit to Kabul, told BBC's Persian TV: "Pakistan's ISI can play a role in negotiations and I support that role.
"Pakistan has an influence in this area and has a legitimate security interest."
The former ISI head, retired Gen Hamid Gul, talked about this relationship with his trademark bluntness. Speaking to me in an interview on the BBC's Newshour programme, he said: "America is history, Karzai is history, the Taliban are the future."
Pakistan, he warned, "would be unwise to cut all contacts and goodwill with the future leaders of Afghanistan".
A growing role for Islamabad causes unease in Kabul. President Karzai and key members of his team have repeatedly criticised the role of the ISI in providing sanctuary to Taliban leaders.
'Exaggerating'
The president has made it clear he wants any reconciliation to be an Afghan-led and controlled process.

The US is hailing its relationship with Pakistan
There's been no official announcement from Kabul yet to Mullah Baradar's capture.
A few years ago, Kabul opened contacts with another senior Taliban leader, Mullah Mansoor Dadullah, who had also fallen out with Mullah Omar, only to have Pakistan capture him in early 2008. At the time, a senior Afghan intelligence official expressed anger and dismay.
Dutch journalist Bette Dam, author of a recent book on Hamid Karzai, has written of years of contacts between the president and Mullah Baradar, who are both from the Popalzai tribe.
Mullah Baradar is said to have come to the rescue of Hamid Karzai when he was threatened by Taliban fighters in the southern province of Uruzgan after the 9/11 attacks.
On her most recent visit to Uruzgan in December, Ms Dam said that she had been informed that Mullah Baradar made a visit to Kabul last year.
Afghans in the province - the birthplace of Mullah Baradar - also spoke of "how powerful and increasingly independent he had become in the Taliban movement, establishing his own committees and charities, and operating though his own tribal networks".
The question now is what impact will his arrest have on any future negotiations with the Taliban and on Pakistan's role in this process.
Biggest blow
Islamabad is being hailed in Washington for its co-operation with the US.
For the Americans, this success comes only weeks after the CIA suffered its biggest blow in decades. It lost seven operatives when a double agent detonated a suicide vest at their base in the eastern province of Khost.
But many key details of this latest operation are still unclear. Reports are now emerging that Mullah Baradar may have been detained earlier than the dates cited in the original story in the New York Times.
It's also still not clear how much involvement US intelligence had in the raid and how much access they have to this valuable source, who has an enormous store of knowledge about the movement, including their contacts with the ISI.
One Western source in Kabul said that the Americans were exaggerating the level of co-operation.
US intelligence officer Col Shaffer argues that what happens next is of key importance.
"We should watch very closely what happens," he remarked.
 

ajtr

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INDIA, PAKISTAN, AFGHANISTAN & THE US

B.RAMAN


Here are my answers to four questions e-mailed to me on March 3,2010, by a correspondent of the "Washington Post":


Question: Is the Indian government growing increasingly frustrated over the Obama administration's policy of reconciliation with the so called good Taliban? And why or how will this impact India and U.S. relations? What position does this put India in?


Answer:"Frustrated" is not the word. India is increasingly concerned over the US belief that there are good fundamentalists and bad fundamentalists and that it can do business with the good fundamentalists and bring them into the mainstream. India looks upon the "war" against the Taliban and Al Qaeda in Afghanistan as directed not only against these organisations, but also against their ideology of religious obscurantism by projecting before the Afghan people the ideas of a secular and liberal democratic society.If it makes a deal with the so-called good Taliban even if they do not give up their medieval ideas, the US will be admitting beforehand that it has lost the ideological battle. It will not be good for Afghanistan and other Muslim countries. And it will not be good for India, which has the second largest Muslim community in the world.


Question: Is India worried that Pakistan is getting too strong b/c the U.S. is courting Pakistan in its fight? And why is this a concern to India ie - despite Mumbai, despite everything, is there a growing feeling in Delhi that Pakistan will hoodwink the world?


Answer:India is worried over the US readiness to close its eyes to Pakistan's use of terrorism against India so long as Pakistan acts against terrorism directed against the US and helps the US in preventing another 9/11 in the US homeland. Pakistan is confident that so long as it helps the US against the Taliban and Al Qaeda it does not have to fear any adverse consequences from its continued use of terrorism against India. It is this confidence which should explain its inaction against the Lashkar-e-Toiba and other Punjabi terrorist organisations whose activities are directed against India.Pakistan has been hoodwinking the US not today, but for the last 30 years ever since it started using terrorism against India.It will continue to hoodwink the world brazenly so long it has the confidence that no action will be taken against it.


Question:Is Afghanistan the new Kashmir, a place india and Pakistan are fighting it out?


Answer:In Kashmir, India is resisting Pakistani attempts since 1989 to annex Indian territory through a proxy war using terrorist organisations trained in Pakistan. In Afghanistan, India has been resisting Pakistani efforts to exclude it from playing its due role as a historic ally of Afghanistan and as a well-wisher of the Afghan people who has been trying to help them convert their country into a modern democratic state. In Kashmir, it is a confrontation over territory which belongs to India. In Afghanistan it is a political and ideological confrontation.


Question: How big is India's intelligence presense in Afghanistan - is it robust? Is it as big as Pakistan claims? Does anyone know?


Answer: I would not know whether India has an intelligence presence in Afghanistan and, if so, how big is it. (3-3-10)


( The writer is Additional Secretary (retd), Cabinet Secretariat, Govt. of India, New Delhi, and, presently, Director, Institute For Topical Studies, Chennai. E-mail: [email protected] )
 

ajtr

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you need to think again because Assassins are patrolling in the sky & their Hell Fires are sending many to hell ;)
may be you missed
Alliance at work :)
any ways good night
Following article gives the clear perspective

Pakistan’s tactical moves displease US

ISLAMABAD, March 5: The US-Pakistan cooperation looks to be unravelling because of differences over Afghanistan, with key figures from both sides getting involved in a blame game. The situation appears set for tense diplomacy in days ahead. Fresh problems in issuance of visas by both countries for diplomats and embassy staffers are just one indication of the underlying tensions and mistrust. Weeks after the visa issue was resolved on the intervention of Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, the caseload of applications by US diplomats and embassy personnel awaiting visas has again risen to about 125. The US embassy in return is delaying the visas of Pakistani diplomats posted in the US. The issue was discussed at a meeting between Foreign Secretary Salman Bashir and US Deputy Chief of Mission Gerald Feierstein on Thursday.

Meanwhile, in an interview with Financial Times, US Special Envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Holbrooke, who had recently dismissed apprehensions about Pakistan’s alleged role in undercutting the Afghan peace process as conspiracy theories, “was agnostic about whether Pakistan had decisively turned against the Afghan Taliban”. He said he was unsure whether relations between the United States and Pakistan had turned a corner after the arrest of top Taliban commander Mullah Baradar.

His remarks followed media comments by Gen Stanley McChrystal, the commander of Nato forces in Afghanistan: “Baradar’s arrest could have been because of an internal feud in Taliban ranks.” These public statements and doubts expressed by US officials in background interviews lend strength to a belief that the Americans are unhappy because the action has been limited to the group that had alienated itself from Taliban supremo Mullah Umar, while other groups like the Haqqani network remain unscathed.

PLEDGES: A senior Pakistani military commander accused the US of not fulfilling pledges. “There is a clear gap between what we had been promised and the subsequent US action,” he said. After the Jan 28 London conference there appeared to be a sudden, but unexplained, surge in counter-terrorism cooperation between Islamabad and Washington. The first manifestation of the increased bonhomie came with the surprise arrest of Mullah Baradar. This was followed by arrests of certain key Taliban commanders by Pakistani security forces and an offer by India to engage with Pakistan at the foreign secretaries’ level.

The deciding factor behind the developments are intriguing. A source privy to the bargain, while disclosing its broader contours, said it hinged on recognition of each other’s ‘concerns and constraints’. The two ‘Cs’ from Pakistan’s context related to India’s role in Afghanistan; Pakistan’s position in negotiations for Afghan reconciliation and reintegration process; and an end to maligning of Pakistan’s armed forces and intelligence agencies. “Neither has been Pakistan’s role in reintegration process defined as yet nor has any serious effort been undertaken to curb India’s growing influence there, especially the activities of its intelligence outfit – RAW – that are prejudicial to Pakistani interests.” Pakistan’s offer to train the Afghan National Army wasn’t endorsed by the US either. The training offer was based on the hope of neutralising Indian influence in Afghanistan’s security apparatus.

The emergence of cracks in the new-found US-Pakistan cooperation incidentally coincided with a heightening proxy war between Pakistan and India in Afghanistan. This only re-emphasised that the interests of the two countries remained at the core of any plan to stabilise Afghanistan. The cooperation was too good to last in the first place, a senior diplomat observed. “It had its basis in President Obama’s brusque letter delivered by US National Security Adviser James Jones to President Zardari late last year. The message amounted to arm-twisting Pakistani agencies into cooperation.” A security analyst further noted that Pakistani agencies took steps that they could afford and at the same time pinched the other side more.

Pakistan nabbed Mullah Baradar, who had distanced himself from Mullah Umar and was emerging as a negotiator with the Americans yearning for a settlement with the Taliban. Baradar’s other comrades were also in the net before long. The move by Pakistan put the US in a quandary. The Americans could not criticise the arrests as they themselves had been clamouring for it since long. But at the same time they could do nothing but helplessly see their plans for landing a deal with the Taliban being derailed. Nevertheless, Washington put on a happy face, while keeping its fingers crossed in anticipation of an across-the-board action against all Taliban groups based in Pakistan.A senior official in Islamabad said Pakistan was now in a ‘win-win situation’. He said the step-by-step approach was in Pakistan’s interest and there was no need to move against all groups at the same time.

Pakistan’s strategists wanted the arrangement to progress on the basis of reciprocity, but slow progress by the US on its assurances halted the forward movement and eventually the two sides regressed into the mistrust that had been the hallmark of their relations over the past few years. The timing of the new Pakistan-US tiff could have not been more inopportune. The two countries were preparing not only to resume their Strategic Dialogue by the end of the month, but also upgrade it to foreign ministers level. Chief of Army Staff Gen Ashfaq Parvez Kayani is scheduled to visit Washington this month for discussions on the proposed strategic partnership.

The feeling in military circles, ahead of the high-level interaction, is quite obvious. They are more interested in the US addressing their concerns about Indian role in Afghanistan, future of ties with India, and providing them with an apt solution to the energy crisis – a reference to a probable nuclear energy deal on the pattern of India-US cooperation in this field. “This could form the basis of a true and long-term relationship,” a general said. He further noted that the country was not much interested in military hardware, recalling that it had survived long years of American sanctions.
 
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Vinod2070

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The simple fact is that Afghans are highly anti-Pak. Any government there is not goin to accept the Durand line and will try to liberate the Pakistani Pushtuns. Even Taliban didn't accept the line.

All non-Pushtuns are vehemently anti-Pak. Even Afghan Pushtuns are anti-Pak. So a stable Afghanistan is always going to be anti_pakistan. always has been, always will be.

A natural partner to us. ;)

Picture abhi baaki hai mere dost.
 

DaRk WaVe

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WHAT NEXT IN PAKISTAN'S PASHTUN BELT?
B.RAMAN


Nice article :)


3.There is a gentlemen's agreement between Islamabad and Washington that the former will keep making proforma protests against the Drone strikes without trying to stop them. If Pakistan protests really and vehemently, the US will have to stop them. The US is able to continue them because the Pakistani protests are a charade. Pakistan knows it is benefiting from the Drone strikes and wants them to continue. Fears that disproportionate civilian casualties might add to anti-American feelings have been belied. Civilian casualties there have been, but they are not as heavy as made out by some US analysts. Even the Pakistani civil society and the local tribal population no longer protest against the civilian casualties. They have realised that by eliminating the jihadi terrorist leaders of not only Al Qaeda, but also indigenous organisations such as the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and the anti-Shia Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LEJ) and trans-border organisations such as the anti-Chinese Islamic Movement of East Turkestan (IMET) the US has given them some relief from the intimidation and terror imposed on the local population by these terrorist groups.
I 101% agree with it, Drones are doing a great job as of now & local population is going against them :)
Drones are all right, they have taken out some big fishes

5. The remarkable successes of the US intelligence in North Waziristan have been accompanied by the headway made by the Pakistani security forces in the Swat Valley, South Waziristan and the Bajaur Agency. These operations cannot be described as successful in terms of identified terrorist leaders neutralised by the Pakistan Army. Many of the terrorist leaders operating in these areas have escaped capture by the Pakistan Army. Their trained followers have dispersed and peeled off. They have retained a capability for re-grouping and striking back at a later stage if the Army pressure eases.
with Exception of Fazullah, most of the leaders are sent to Hell, There will remain the myth of their regrouping & only time will wether its a myth or reality

6. Despite this, the Pakistan Army operations have been successful in the sense that it has been able to re-establish territorial control over Swat, South Waziristan and the Bajaur Agency and deny the use of this territory to the terrorists. Is this territorial control ephemeral or will it be enduring? The training and equipment given by the US to Pakistani para-military forces such as the Frontier Corps have improved their morale and made them fight better to wrest control of the territory from the terrorists, but their ability to hold on to the "newly liberated" territory in the face of a renewed assault is yet to be tested.
The denial of terrotory will be done through local Militia & better training of FC & after all army will have to leave these areas

London, Mar.21 (ANI): After reports of US security officials imparting training to the Pakistan military, it has now been revealed that a team of British military personnel is also working with the Pak Frontier Corps (FC), The Times Online reports.
A small team of conventional British military personnel is working in a Frontier Corps training school, conducting mutual co-operation training to assist the Frontier Corps in enhancing its capability, a British High Commission spokesperson in Islamabad said.
The British Defence Ministry said team is in Pakistan for the last one year, refused to divulge any details in the context.
According to the sources, the main motive behind such training programs is to develop a a counter-insurgency force that is aware with the geography of the region.
A senior US official said that Pakistani forces do not have the ability to curb insurgency effectively, thus such training modules were necessarily needed.
We”ve been pushing this because the Pakistani Army is simply not designed for counter-insurgency. Its designed for a conventional war with India, he added.
The Obama administration has also provided Frontier Corps with an extra aid of 43.8 million dollars with an aim to equip it modern weapons.
Washington is planning to spend up to 400 million dollars on upgrading the corps, and is also planning of building a new training base outside Peshawar. (ANI)


Bajur is a sucess story & must be appreciated & Tribesmen are on our side


US welcomes Bajaur success, rejects conspiracy theories on Pakistani anti-militant drive

WASHINGTON, March 3 (APP): The United States welcomed Pakistan’s success in wresting control of a strategic militant redoubt in Bajaur tribal area which al-Qaeda- linked militants used as a hub for activities across the Afghan border.“I don’t know the details, but I’m delighted they feel they’re making progress....the fact that they feel they’ve succeeded there is a very positive development,” Richard Holbrooke, Special Representative for Pakistan and Afghanisan said Tuesday upon his return from a visit to South and Central Asian countries.

He spoke hours after a senior Pakistani commander said in Damadola village of Bajaur tribal region on the Afghan border that the Pakistan security forces had seized the infrastructure including a network of caves the militants used for their activities.

Ambassador Holbrooke also hailed Pakistan’s recent arrests of some top Afghan Taliban leaders and rejected “conspiracy theories” and media speculation about motives behind Islamabad’s stepped up anti-militancy drive, which coincides coalition forces’s operation in Marjah in Afghanistan.

“I see no evidence to support that theory. But it’s out there.
Conspiracy theories are stock-in-trade in not just in this part of the world. But I don’t see any evidence for it,” he answered when asked about to comment on a news story speculating that Pakistani captures of Afghan militants were meant to harm the reintegration process underway in Afghanistan or perhaps Pakistan wanted to show its influence over militants.


“And I know somewhat more than I’m at liberty to disclose about the circumstances under which these events took place, and every detail tends to work against that thesis,” Holbrooke stated emphatically.
He elaborated that anti-militant efforts are “work in progress” and particularly noted the fact that Islamabad is continuing its operations in the face of some pressing economic, water and energy problems.
“This is a very important sequence of events, and we hope it will continue. I don’t want to draw any strategic conclusions from it. I just want to express my appreciation to the Pakistani Government and its army for what it’s doing,” he said referring to a series of actions against Taliban in Swat, South Waziristan, elimination of Pakistani Taliban leaders and capture of Afghan Taliban leader Mullah Baradar.

“They’re doing these things in the face of enormous, overwhelming economic problems. They’re doing it in the face of water and energy problems, which are getting more and more of our attention. We, in turn, are trying to increase our support for the Pakistanis.”
Ambassador Holbrooke also cited improvement in US-Pakistan relations over the last year as a result of high-level American engagement with the Pakistani leadership.

“Well, this is a work in progress. This Administration took office just over 13 months ago. I have said before and I’ll say it again today that U.S. relations with the Government of Pakistan, civilian and military side, are much better today than they were 13 months ago,” he said referring to visits by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Defense Secretary Robert Gates, National Security Adviser James Jones, Senator Kerry and other American leaders.

“So there’s a cumulative effect, in my view, of this effort.
And to me, the turning point trip was Secretary Clinton’s at the end of October--- she did a very public series of meetings and a very intense private series of meetings. She answered every question, no matter how hostile they were, and won over a lot of people. And this came right on the heels of the misunderstanding over the Kerry-Lugar-Berman legislation, which was an unfortunate misunderstanding, in my view. So this process has produced a gradual improvement in cooperation.”

Holbrooke said a water resources task force has been set up at the State Department and the US is working on ways to help Pakistan grapple with water issues.

as for leaders, no need to doubt our 'performance', we have literally liquidated even the Quetta Shura

Shura and committee members killed or captured:

• Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar directed the Quetta Shura. Baradar was the Afghan Taliban's second in command and the group's operational commander, and was detained in Karachi sometime in January or February 2010.
• Maulvi Abdul Kabir led the Peshawar Regional Military Council before he was captured by Pakistani intelligence in February 2010. He served as the Taliban's former shadow governor of the eastern Afghan province of Nangarhar, as well as the governor of Nangarhar during the Taliban’s reign.
• Mullah Mir Mohammed served as the shadow governor in the northern province of Baghlan. He was detained in February 2010.
• Mullah Abdul Salam served as the shadow governor in the northern province of Kunduz. He was detained in February 2010.
• Mullah Dadullah Akhund was the Taliban’s top military commander in the South. He was killed in May 2007 by British special forces in Helmand province.
• Akhtar Mohammad Osmani was a member of the Quetta Shura and was the Taliban's chief of military operations in the provinces of Uruzgan, Nimroz, Kandahar, Farah, Herat, and Helmand, as well as a top aide to Mullah Omar. He also personally vouched for the safety of Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar. He was killed by Coalition forces while traveling near the Pakistani border in December 2006.
• Mullah Obaidullah Akhund was the Taliban Defense Minister during the reign of the Taliban from 1996 until the US toppled the government in the fall of 2001. He was close to Mullah Omar. His status is uncertain; he has been reported to have been arrested and released several times by Pakistani security forces. He was last reported in Pakistani custody in February 2008.
• Mullah Mansur Dadullah Akhund, who is also known as Mullah Bakht Mohammed, replaced his brother Mullah Dadullah Akhund as the top commander in the South during the summer of 2007. His status is uncertain; he was last reported to have been arrested by Pakistani security forces in January 2008 but is thought to have been exchanged as part of a hostage deal.
• Anwarul Haq Mujahid was a member of the Peshawar Regional Military Shura and the commander of the Tora Bora Military Front, which is based in Nangarhar province. He was detained in Peshawar in June 2009. Mujahid is the son of Maulvi Mohammed Yunis Khalis, a senior mujahedeen leader who was instrumental in welcoming Osama bin Laden into Afghanistan after he was ejected from the Sudan in 1996.
• Mullah Ustad Mohammed Yasir was the chief of the Recruitment Committee and a Taliban spokesman before he was arrested in Peshawar in January 2009.
• Mullah Younis, who is also known as Akhunzada Popalzai, was a former shadow governor of Zabul. He served as a police chief in Kabul during Taliban rule. He was captured in Karachi in February 2010.

but in the end i also agree with the writer that we need more of civilan control & include FATA in mainstream for that, we need to DO MORE & we will do it inshallah

Political parties act to be extended to FATA: Gilani

* PM urges politicians to live amicably with each other
* PPP leaders demand ANP implement power sharing formula


PESHAWAR: The political parties act will be extended to FATA after peace is restored and military operations conclude in the restive parts of the Tribal Areas, Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani said on Thursday.

Addressing members of the Pakistan People’s Party’s parliamentary party at the Governor’s House, Gilani said tribal people would be brought into mainstream politics and development, adding the vision of the Bhutto family for the Tribal Areas would be carried forward in the form of the socio-economic emancipation of the people of the region.

Gilani said unlike in the past, his government believed in moving forward by taking along the opposition in all areas for the greater good of the country and the people.

Living amicably: He also stressed on politicians belonging to different parties to get used to living with each other amicably.

He said his government was taking forward Benazir Bhutto’s vision of following the politics of harmony and strengthening democracy.

Gilani said the Charter of Democracy is being implemented with support from all political parties, adding amendments in the 1973 constitution and its restoration in light of the CoD would be a great success for the PPP.

He said the government believed in taking up development projects that had an impact on the people of their particular constituencies and hoped improved law and order would invite higher investment with the generation of increased economic activity.

Regarding the upcoming local government elections, Gilani said it had been decided on the recommendations of all the chief ministers that a similar system would be adopted in all provinces.

He told the PPP workers that he had started organising party conventions across the country to reorganise the party at the grassroots, as envisioned by its founding leader Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and mentioned similar conventions held in Sindh and Punjab.

“I am a party worker and not the leader. It is our duty to listen to the point of view of the party workers as it’s because of you we are in the government today,” he added.

Formula: However, the Pakistan People’s Party leaders demanded the Awami National Party – its coalition partner – implement the power sharing formula in its true sense, otherwise the party ministers would quit their posts and sit in the opposition.

The PPP leadership said if their demands were not met by March 30, the party would sit in the opposition but continue supporting the ANP.

They said the ANP was violating the power sharing formula and ignoring its coalition partner in appointments, postings and transfers.

“One of our demands was the removal of Governor Owais Ahmed Ghani. We want a governor from our party,” Syed Ayub Shah, PPP(P) Peshawar president, told Daily Times. app/zakir hassnain
 
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ajtr

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same news but pakistani source.

India rethinking Afghan policy

* NSC meeting mulls engaging Taliban, interacting with Pak Army, intelligence
* India says it won’t scale down Afghan operations in wake of Kabul attack

By Iftikhar Gilani

NEW DELHI: India is planning to open channels of communication with the Afghan Taliban to remain relevant, in the wake of the Western pullout and the fast deteriorating situation in Afghanistan.

Media reports suggest that a host of options were discussed at a meeting of the National Security Council (NSC), chaired by Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, on February 12, which included engaging the Taliban and opening channels of communication directly with the Pakistan Army and its intelligence to ensure safety of its citizens and interests in Kabul. Experts called it a “cold” and “hard” reality.

Intelligence experts have also asked the Indian government to explore alternative political pastures as Afghan President Hamid Karzai was too week to stand the Western pullout. The NSC meeting also decided to step up diplomatic efforts to involve Iran, Russia and Central Asian Republics to prevent handing over of Afghanistan to Pakistan on a platter.

They described Pakistani Foreign Secretary Salman Bashir’s tough talking during the recently-concluded talks in New Delhi as an indicator of these “realities”, which has boosted Pakistan’s confidence.

Recently, India’s former deputy national security adviser Satish Chandra had also questioned New Delhi’s treatment of the Taliban as “untouchables”. He revealed that during former premier Rajiv Gandhi’s tenure, contacts had been established with militants, including warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar. “Once in power, the Taliban’s national interests will inevitably over time lead them to view us more favourably unless we treat them as untouchables. This has been true of most regimes in Afghanistan and may well be true of the Taliban if we play our cards right and do not gratuitously rub them the wrong way,” he added.

Operations: Separately, Indian External Affairs Ministry spokesman Vishnu Prakash on Saturday said India would not scale down its operations in Afghanistan in the wake of the February 26 attack in Kabul.
 

DaRk WaVe

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The attacks of Taliban against India have only embolden India to send more security. Now there will be more Indian troops in Afghanistan than ever. I call that a failure for Pakistani goals of expelling India.
how many security personnels ? Do you think it is going to matter significantly, It will only serve as extra targets for Taliban & you all know that Taliban are going to Label Indians Foreign & kill 'em

I don't understand how you think Pakistan is failing in expelling India, When article clearly says your regime wants to 'talk' :)
I hope you have got it
 

Vinod2070

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^^ The only thing you have succeeded in is in making most Afghans into implacable enemies of your country!

These small games notwithstanding, Pakistan has lost on that front already and that is bound to result in payback. Too early for you to pronounce victory. It is an ongoing game and India will be a player in this game, a major player. ;)
 

johnee

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India's Kabul medical mission has been suspended temporarily. Must say that the Pakis have succeeded in their ploy to scare away India from Astan. MMS's Govt failed geostrategically.
 

DaRk WaVe

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The simple fact is that Afghans are highly anti-Pak. Any government there is not goin to accept the Durand line and will try to liberate the Pakistani Pushtuns. Even Taliban didn't accept the line.

All non-Pushtuns are vehemently anti-Pak. Even Afghan Pushtuns are anti-Pak. So a stable Afghanistan is always going to be anti_pakistan. always has been, always will be.

A natural partner to us. ;)
Afghans are anti Pak, yes, but what makes you think that Pushtuns on our side of Durand line are 100% Anti-Pak ( there are some factions but they are almost negligible & those who challenged out writ are annihilated & WILL be annihilated)

Picture abhi baaki hai mere dost.
no doubt about it :D
 
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DaRk WaVe

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India suspends Kabul medical mission

Himalayan News Service

NEW DELHI: The Ministry of External Affairs has said that the Indian Medical Mission in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, has been temporarily suspended, but similar missions in other cities of the country have been functioning normally.

Responding to a query on reports that after the terrorist attack in Kabul on February 26, the work of the Indian Medical Missions (IMMs) in Afghanistan has been suspended, spokesperson for the Ministry

Vishnu Prakash said: “The Indian Medical Missions in Herat, Kandahar, Jalalabad and Mazar-e-Sharif are functioning normally.”

“In the aftermath of the terrorist attack targeting the IMM in Kabul, in which one doctor

was killed and others injured, the work of the IMM has been temporarily suspended,” Prakash said in a press release issued here today.

“The Embassy of India and its other offices in Afghanistan continue to function normally in the face of extremely demanding and difficult circumstances,” the press release added.

National Security Advisor Shivshankar Menon has visited Afghanistan to take

stock of the security situation in Afghanistan. India is one of the key partners of Afghanistan in the latter’s reconstruction efforts.

The Himalayan Times : India suspends Kabul medical mission - Detail News : Nepal News Portal
 

johnee

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Afghans are anti Pak, yes, but what makes you think that Pushtuns on our side of Durand line are 100% Anti-Pak ( there are some factions but they are almost negligible & those who challenged out writ are annihilated)

Emoji, your leadership(I mean PA) has no direct control over those regions. Those regions are ruled indirectly by depending on various factions. Also there is not much difference in the pastuns regardless of artificial boundaries like Durand. They are all one big community and live that way. Pashtuns, in general, have anti-PA feelings and anti-Pakjab feelings.
 

Vinod2070

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Afghans are anti Pak, yes, but what makes you think that Pushtuns on our side of Durand line are 100% Anti-Pak ( there are some factions but they are almost negligible & those who challenged out writ are annihilated)
I didn't actually say that Pushtuns on your side of the Durand line are anti-Pak. I just mentioned the Afghan Pushtuns.

Though I have seen several reports about even many of the Pakistani Pushtuns being anti-Pak, I am not fully convinced so far that it runs very deep.

Just see the articles by Farhan Taj (a Pushtun) from the ground in the tribal areas. She mentions how they are so appreciative of the drones (comparing them to ababeels from the Quran) and so critical of the ISI and the PA at the same time.
 

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Vinod, Pakjabis(PA) try to deflect all the hate towards US(drones) and India(kafir) but I dont think the Pashtuns share these feelings. Pashtuns seem to be fed up of the PA's actions and the Pakjabi elites' indifference.
 

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