Afghan forces raid Pakistani village, kill 2 'Taliban suspects'

KS

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Daily Times - Leading News Resource of Pakistan


* Afghan forces raid house of tribal elder Sadullah in Badini area close to border

* Balochistan government informs Foreign Ministry of incident

By Mohammad Zafar

QUETTA: Afghan security forces raided a house inside Pakistan, kidnapped two suspected Taliban fighters and later shot them dead, sources said on Saturday.

The incident took place in Badini area close to the Afghan border.

"The Afghan forces raided the residence of tribal elder Sadullah Kakar and whisked away two Taliban suspects," the sources said.

The house is located more than a kilometre inside the Pakistani territory, they said, adding that the Afghan forces violated the borders, attacked the residence of Kakar and took with them two persons – Abdullah and Muhammad Sarwar Shabozai. Residents of the area confirmed the two people had been shot dead by Afghan forces. Officials said the Afghan authorities had not returned the bodies of the slain Pakistanis. The relatives of the victims said, however, that three people had been abducted and killed by Afghan forces. The third victim, according to them, was identified as Din Muhammad.

Taking strong exception to the border violation, the Balochistan government has informed the Foreign Ministry about the incident. "We have convened an immediate meeting with the Quetta-based Afghan Consul General through the Foreign Ministry to discuss the incident that took place in Qilla Saifullah," said Balochistan Home Secretary Nasebullah Bazai.

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Looks like Indian Army is training the Afghan forces nice enough :thumb:
 

pmaitra

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Taking strong exception to the border violation, the Balochistan government has informed the Foreign Ministry about the incident.
Strong exception my foot. What about Pakistan constantly violating the border for more than a decade?

Good job Afghans!
 

KS

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Strong exception my foot. What about Pakistan constantly violating the border for more than a decade?

Good job Afghans!
For starters, Afghans dont recognize the Duran line as valid..So technically there was no violation in the first place ...:rolleyes:
 

Tronic

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Now it is time for the Afghans to show the Indian government how to catch and kill terrorist rats.

Job well done, if true.
 

Bhadra

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One day the Durranies (Pathans) will trample the plains of Pakistani Punjab as they always did !
 

Yusuf

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Didn't try kill any terrorists in uniform?
 

Yusuf

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Afghans should join hands with Baloch Liberation Army. Unfortunately that is very difficult bu then that would create a lot of pressure on the pakis.
 

pmaitra

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Afghans should join hands with Baloch Liberation Army. Unfortunately that is very difficult bu then that would create a lot of pressure on the pakis.
I don't see that happening anytime soon. The Baloch Nationalists have claims on large tracts of Afghan territory.

See the dark green region:


We have 4 parties here:
  • Baloch
  • Afghanistan
  • Pakistan
  • Iran


They all have some disputes with each other, except for between Iran and Afghanistan.
 

Yusuf

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Yeah PM that's why I said its difficult to see it happening but if a compromise is reached between afghans and Baloch against their common enemy, it will help both of them.
 

Ray

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All this is also connected to inter tribal rivalry too!
 

Daredevil

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Well done Afghans. You showed balls unlike Indian polity.
 

pmaitra

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All this is also connected to inter tribal rivalry too!
Absolutely.

I was having a discussion with a Russian friend of mine. Her father was was deployed in Afghanistan during the Soviet-Mujahideen War. Afghans were like, one man from one tribe would tell the Soviets that there were Mujahideen hiding in a certain village and they should go and bomb them. The Soviets would simply go and bomb that village to smithereens. Often, it would turn out that the Afghan who gave the information actually had some personal scores to settle with someone in that village and there no Mujahideen at all.

You never know. It's very complicated.
 

KS

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Absolutely.

I was having a discussion with a Russian friend of mine. Her father was was deployed in Afghanistan during the Soviet-Mujahideen War. Afghans were like, one man from one tribe would tell the Soviets that there were Mujahideen hiding in a certain village and they should go and bomb them. The Soviets would simple go and bomb that village to smithereens. Often, it would turn out that the Afghan who gave the information actually had some personal scores to settle with someone in that village and there no Mujahideen at all.

You never know. It's very complicated.
That happens many times in Kashmir too.

Here its not inter-tribal conflicts but personal enmity. If some one did not like other, they would just tip the sec forces that this guy was an informer to terrorist groups or he was a terrorist himself. The sec forces do the rest and then all hell breaks loose.
 

pmaitra

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That happens many times in Kashmir too.

Here its not inter-tribal conflicts but personal enmity. If some one did not like other, they would just tip the sec forces that this guy was an informer to terrorist groups or he was a terrorist himself. The sec forces do the rest and then all hell breaks loose.
Yes, it is true that often many innocents get killed, there is always more than what meets the eye.

Then there was the tomato sauce encounter, if you heard about it.
 

Ray

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In the tribal areas of Pashtunkhwa, Waziristan, there are many reasons why these things happen.

The tribal rivalry and blood feuds are paramount, and from time immemorial, money changing hands have played a great role in keeping a tab on the activities in these areas.

Nowadays, this region of what is today northwest Pakistan is variously called "Al-Qaedastan," "Talibanistan," or more properly, the "Islamic Emirate of Waziristan." Pakistan gave up South Waziristan to the Taliban in Spring 2006, after taking heavy casualties in a failed four-year campaign to consolidate control of this fierce tribal region. By the fall, Pakistan had effectively abandoned North Waziristan. The nominal truce—actually closer to a surrender—was signed in a soccer stadium, beneath al-Qaeda's black flag.

Having recovered the safe haven once denied them by America's invasion of Afghanistan, al-Qaeda and the Taliban have gathered the diaspora of the worldwide Islamist revolution into Waziristan. Slipping to safety from Tora Bora, Osama bin Laden himself almost certainly escaped across its border. Now Muslim punjabis who fight the Indian army in Kashmir, Chechen opponents of Russia, and many more Islamist terror groups congregate, recuperate, train, and confer in Waziristan. This past fall's terror plotters in Germany and Denmark allegedly trained in Waziristan, as did those who hoped to highjack transatlantic planes leaving from Britain's Heathrow Airport in 2006. The crimson currents flowing across what Samuel Huntington once famously dubbed "Islam's bloody borders" now seem to emanate from Waziristan.

Slowly but surely, the Islamic Emirate's writ is pushing beyond Waziristan itself, to encompass other sections of Pakistan's mountainous tribal regions—thereby fueling the ongoing insurgency across the border in Afghanistan. With a third of Pakistanis in a recent poll expressing favorable views of al-Qaeda, and 49% registering favorable opinions of local jihadi terror groups, the Islamic Emirate of Waziristan may yet conquer Pakistan. Fear of a widening Islamist rebellion in this nuclear-armed state wasGeneral Musharraf's stated reason for the recent imposition of a state of emergency. And in fact Osama bin Laden publicly called for the overthrow of Musharraf's government this past September. It is for fear of provoking such a disastrous revolt that we have so far dared not loose the American military steamroller in Waziristan. When Lord Curzon hesitated to start up the British military machine, he was revolving in his mind the costs and consequences of the great 1857 Indian "Mutiny" and of an 1894 jihadist revolt in South Waziristan. Surely, Curzon would have appreciated our dilemma today.....

Tribal Society

The connection arises from the way Middle Eastern tribes are organized. These tribes are giant lineages, traced from male ancestors, which sub-divide into tribal segments, which in turn divide into clans, sub-clans, and so on, down to families, in which cousins may be pitted against cousins, or brother against brother. Traditionally existing outside the police powers of the state, Middle Eastern tribes keep order through a complex balance of power between these ever-fusing and -dividing ancestral groups. (Anthropologists call such tribes "segmentary lineages.")

In such tribes, the central institution is the feud. Absent state policing, security depends on the willingness of every adult male in a given family, clan, tribe, etc., to take up arms in its defense. An attack on a lineage-mate must be avenged by the entire group. Likewise, any lineage member is liable to be killed for an offense committed by a relative, just as all lineage members would collectively share in compensation should peace be made (through, say, a tribal council or the mediation of a holy man). Tribal feuding and segmentation allow society to keep a rough (sometimes very rough) peace in the absence of a state. Conversely, societies with strong tribal components tend to have weak states.

A powerful code of honor ties the system together. Among the Pushtun tribes that populate Waziristan and much of Afghanistan, that code is called "Pushtunwali." Avenging lineage honor is only one aspect of Pushtunwali. The code also mandates that hospitality and sanctuary be provided to any stranger requesting them. Thus a means is provided whereby, in the absence of a state, zones of security are established for travelers. Yet the system is based on an ever-shifting balance of terror which turns friends into enemies, and back again into friends, in a heartbeat. And this ethos of honor writes violent revenge and collective guilt deep into the cultural psyche. Although the British political agents who learned to live with Pushtunwali generally lionized it, Winston Churchill condemned it as a "system of ethics, which regards treachery and violence as virtues rather than vices." In any case, the dynamics of the war on terror are easily recognizable as an extension of this tribal system of collective guilt, honor, humiliation, and revenge.

The Claremont Institute - Tribes of Terror
 

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