9 Indians among 15 dead as Taliban bombers attack Kabul

Vinod2070

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Vinod2070

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So the terror games by our neighbors are still on!
 

ahmedsid

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Yup, The game is on!!! Sad to see these brave people loose their lives. Going to Afghanistan is the bravest thing anyone can do! I salute these people! May their Souls rest in Peace!
 

NSG_Blackcats

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As per new reports 2 Indian Army officers in Kabul are missing. 5 Indian Army personal are in hospital with burn injuries.
 

Super Commando Dhruva

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Afghanistan is still considered as Pakistan backyard by ISI and Indian presence makes them uncomfortable. Pakistan knows that they don't have public opinion in their favor and sooner or later Afghanistan is going to stand against Pakistan atrocities. Indian role resurrects Afghanistan as well as other skeletons in Pakistan's closet like taliban and disputed durrand line.

Whatever excuse or brainwashing Pakistan does to its gullible audience, fact remains Pakistan wants to see Afghanistan under Taliban rule for eternity. One day NATO will leave AF and PAK would be delighted to press reset button on AF. You will often hear PAK saying these taliban were creation of west blah blah blah but US version contained Uzbek and Tazik fighters, not pashtoons one.

Great loss to our nation,Its not only a loss of life but also a loss of skilled and trained professionals.
 

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Two Army officers among six Indians killed in Kabul attack

Kabul/New Delhi, Feb 26 (PTI)

In yet another attack on Indians in Afghanistan, Taliban terrorists today targeted hotels, killing six Indians associated with developmental work in the country, including two Major rank Army officers.

At least 10 others, including five Indian Army officers, were injured in a coordinated strike that killed 11 others, including locals and nationals from other countries.

The bombers, believed to be three in number, struck at the guesthouses, particularly at Park Residence, rented out by the Indian embassy for its staffers and those linked to India's developmental work in Afghanistan.

The deceased Indians were identified as Major Dr Laishram Jyotin Singh of Army Medical Corps, Major Deepak Yadav of Army Education Corps, engineer Bhola Ram, tabla player Nawab Khan, staffer of Kandahar Consulate Nitish Chibber and ITBP constable Roshan Lal, Indian embassy sources said.

Earlier, the government of India had put the number of those dead at nine, which highly placed sources said was incorrect as it was based on preliminary assessment of the Afghan Interior Ministry.

Jyotin Singh was in Afghanistan to train local doctors at the Indira Gandhi hospital while Deepak Yadav was teaching English at the Afghan Military Academy.

Source: http://www.deccanherald.com/content/55075/two-army-officers-among-six.html
 

Super Commando Dhruva

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Pakistani's don't understand is that terrorism has never achieved anything. Haven't they seen in Kashmir? It cannot change national policies or interest of a country especially India which has gone through hell to be not intimidated any more by such non-sense. This event will further outrage NATO/ISAF forces in AF.

Well India should send couple of thousand soldiers in AF to protect its interests and embassies. Any think tank would advice ramifications of such move? Personals who died in this unfortunate incident doesn't look like high value targets to me. Is it a pitfall to move Indian forces in AF so that PAK can isolate us in oil exporting arab world?
 

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Kabul attackers searched and killed Indians

Kabul: Indians were the prime target in Friday's suicide attack carried out by Taliban terrorists in Kabul in which 17 people including 9 (at least) Indians were killed.

Two officers of the Indian Army were among those killed. Five other Army officers were also injured in the attack.

Indian Ambassador in Kabul Jayant Prasad said that it looked like a 26/11 type attack specifically targeting Indians.

"Nine Indians died in yesterday's (Friday) attack. It was a 26/11 type of attack. The attackers searched each and every room and killed people," said Prasad.

Indians killed in the attack have been identified as Major Dr Laishram Jyotin Singh of Army Medical Corps, Major Deepak Yadav of Army Education Corps, engineer Bhola Ram, tabla player Nawab Khan, staffer of Kandahar Consulate Nitish Chibber and Indo Tibetan Border Police constable Roshan Lal

Nine Indians among 16 killed in Kabul attacks
Khan, who was killed in the attack on the guest house known as Park Residence, was part of the three-member cultural troupe which was sent by Indian Council for Cultural Relations to Afghanistan.

Bhola Ram was project director at Afghan Power Grid Corporation and was instrumental in bringing electricity to Kabul from Uzbekistan, sources said.

The project had been completed and Bhola Ram was in the process of handing over the responsibilities to Afghans for which they were being trained.

ITBP constable Roshan Lal, 35, a resident of Himachal Pradesh was deployed as the security personnel at the Indian Consulate in Herat. He was on leave and in transit on his way back home.

Chibber was Secretary at the Indian Consulate in Kandahar.

UN Secretary General Ban ki-Moon, too, has condemned the attack.

"This deliberate targeting of civilians demonstrates once again a senseless disregard for human life on the part of the perpetrators," said Ban.

An Indian Air Force plane has been sent to Kabul to bring home the bodies of the Indians killed in the attack. The Boeing 737-200 aircraft from the Palam-based Communication Squadron is also carrying a team of medical officers, medicines, a team of Army officers and officials from the Ministry of External Affairs.

The attack took place in an area called Shari Nal, an upscale place with many luxury hotels.

The target of the attack, Park Residence, has been rented out by the Indian Embassy for its staffers and those linked to India's developmental work in Afghanistan.

The attack started when a suicide bomber exploded ac car bomb across the street some 60 meters away from the guest house. Then one of the suicide bombers went inside the guest house and started killing people.

The Taliban have already claimed responsibility for the attack with the group's spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid confirming that foreigners were the target.
(With inputs from CNN-IBN and PTI)
 

Singh

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RIP to the Dead, and Godspeed to the injured.

The timing of the attacks is no coincidence.
 

Soham

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Our relations with Afghanistan aren't going to be a weeny bit affected by these Motherfu*kers.
 

GokuInd

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RIP to the fallen.
Our relations with Afghanistan aren't going to be a weeny bit affected by these Motherfu*kers.

The Pakistani officials know they are hugely unpopular in Afghanistan for their repeated interference in its matters in the past. I think this is "courage" born of despair: as of now they absolutely exert no leverage on Afghans vis-a-vis India.
 
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ajtr

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Planning for doomsday: should India send troops to Afghanistan?

It’s called “mission creep”… the creeping expansion of objectives, and the resources that are deployed towards a strategic aim. After a bloody week in Afghanistan --- not just for India, but for Afghan civilians and US forces as well --- New Delhi is confronting an urgent question: should India send in more forces, even the military, to secure our interests in that volatile country?

Accelerating that re-evaluation has been media commentary calling for increased military presence. A respected national daily editorially observed, "After the Kabul bombing, India must come to terms with an important question that it has avoided debating so far. New Delhi cannot continue to expand its economic and diplomatic activity in Afghanistan, while avoiding a commensurate increase in its military presence there. For too long, New Delhi has deferred to Pakistani and American sensitivities about raising India's strategic profile in Afghanistan.”

This dilemma was at the heart of Foreign Secretary Shiv Shankar Menon’s Sunday visit to Kabul, ostensibly to rally morale in the embassy. Fortunately there was no discernible sign of mission creep. Menon assured President Hamid Karzai that India will stand fast in Afghanistan, but the primary responsibility for safeguarding the 4000 Indian doctors, engineers, scientists, executives and labourers there remains with Kabul.

The concept of “Indian security for Indian workers” is an attractive one for a country proud of its military, but must be evaluated cautiously, with a clear understanding that Afghanistan is transitioning from insurgency to civil war. Troops are sent into a deteriorating situation only if their presence can transform impending defeat into a realistic chance of victory. The situation in Afghanistan may have moved beyond that point.

India’s engagement with that country, therefore, must be characterised by the deployment of “soft power”, not the military. The palpable Afghan affection for India flows more from its engagement with Mumbai than with New Delhi. Indian films, music, dance, food, and the peaceful generosity of Indians have transformed our country in Afghan minds into an idyll that far exceeds the reality. This perception has been reinforced by clever aid diplomacy; India has sunk three quarters of a billion dollars into Afghanistan’s medical facilities, educational institutions, public transport, irrigation schemes, even that country’s parliament building.

To now throw troops into what will inevitably become a bloody struggle for power risks smudging India’s benevolent image. Even with the mandate to do no more than safeguard Indian workers and assets in Afghanistan, an enhanced Indian security presence will find its role expanding as the environment becomes more hostile. The very presence of an Indian force will be a magnet for renewed attacks.

Instead, Indian planners should be considering that, perhaps three years along, US and NATO forces may pull out of Afghanistan. Hamid Karzai would be history, and Afghanistan itself divided into different zones of control. In that Afghanistan, India’s physical presence may well be reduced to zero. The ITBP would have pulled out; development projects would have shut down; elements politically hostile to India may well control large parts of the country; the embassy and India’s consulates may well have closed shop. This is what happened in 1996; today, only American and European support --- fickle, and already wavering --- prevents a return to that time.

The US and NATO militaries are already losing the battle as they realise too late that the battlefield is not confined to Afghan soil. After the killing of nine US soldiers on Sunday in a Taliban assault on a US post near the Pakistan border, General David McKiernan, the top NATO commander fumed that militants based in Pakistan had staged attacks in Afghanistan “almost every day I have been here.”

Unlike Russia, which faced the same situation in the 1980s --- an insurgency operating from Pakistan’s North West Frontier Province (NWFP) and Baluchistan --- the US and NATO are making strenuous efforts to shut off Taliban support across the Durand Line. On Saturday, the US Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Mike Mullen paid an unscheduled visit to Pakistan. He demanded to meet army chief, General Pervez Kiyani and told him, apparently in the baldest possible terms, that if the Pakistan army was not going to crack down in the NWFP tribal areas, then US and NATO forces in Afghanistan would operate across the border into Pakistan.

But despite those threats, and the occasional cross-border foray, western forces in Afghanistan can hardly influence events in Pakistan’s tribal areas. Only the Pakistan army can do that, but remains unwilling to. General Kiyani drew Admiral Mullen’s attention to the 800 Pakistani soldiers who have already been killed in counter-militancy operations in the NWFP, suggesting that Pakistan had already done enough. (India has lost close to 7000 soldiers in J&K). The army brass in Pakistan --- which will eventually have the final word on this --- has not yet come round to accepting that the military has little choice but to transform the NWFP from a sanctuary to a battlefield.

Without that realisation in Rawalpindi, a couple of years more of rising casualties in Afghanistan could well trigger a US and NATO pullout. India’s actions today must create influence and goodwill that will sustain itself even without a physical presence. New Delhi must play its own hand in The Great Game in Afghanistan, building bridges with every community and spreading developmental aid across different regions. The Afghan government must be urged to provide the security needed for these projects to continue for as long as possible. And if India is forced to pull out in another interregnum of turmoil, we will continue to reap the benefits of a low-key, aid-driven policy.
 

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Wife unaware Kabul his last stage

NEW DELHI: For two days now, no newspapers have been allowed into tabla maestro Nawab Khan's house in east Delhi's Laxmi Nagar, the television has not been switched on. Khan's wife, Mubina, is not to know that her husband was among the 9 Indians killed in the Taliban attack in Kabul on Friday.

His body has been flown back in a special aircraft but family members believe the news can wait. "His wife has a high blood pressure problem. We only told her that he has been injured in the attack and is critical but still alive. We fear that news of his death can lead to a brain haemorrage," said Nawab Khan's younger brother, Shahbuddin Khan.

The 52-year-old tabla player was in Afghanistan for a series of performances, as part of a cultural group of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR). The artistes were staying at the Safi Landmark Hotel in central Kabul where Taliban suicide bombers and gunmen struck. Khan was travelling wiht is brother Alauddin and nephew Kashif Ahmed.

"We have been hearing very conflicting reports on what happened at the hotel. We were told by ICCR that during the bomb explosion, a portion of the wall in my uncle's room collapsed on him and he suffocated to death," said Amjad Chaudhary, Alauddin's son. "But we heard rumours that the Taliban had forcibly entered the hotel rooms. My father has not been able to even speak to me. I spoke to Kashif for a few minutes only and he was equally shaken. Both of them have minor injuries."

Khan was, in fact, packing to leave for the airport when the attack took place. "He left for Kabul on February 15 and was due back on February 26. We are happy that he was able to perform at the cultural show for which he made the journey," said a family member.

Surived by six children, four of them still in school, Khan's family is worried about how the family will make ends meet. The eldest son is 23 years old while the youngest is just five. "We knew it was a hostile environment and my brother had his reservations too. But he still chose to go. He was travelled to several places for his shows," said Shahbuddin.

Khan was the son of famous sarangi player, Banne Khan, and had played the tabla with greats Ghulam Ali, Rashid Khan, Begum Parveen Sultana and Salamat Ali Khan. Alauddin, who is one of the country's few esraj (a string instrument) players, was a frequent companion. "Nawab started learning the tabla when was just seven years old and earned quite a name for himself," said Shahbuddin.

ICCR announces Rs 10L, job for Nawab's son

The Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) has announced a compensation of Rs 10 lakh to the family of tabla maestro Nawab Khan who was killed in the Taliban attack in Kabul on Friday. His eldest son will also be given a job at ICCR. "This is the first time that a cultural troupe of ICCR has been attacked and we share the anguish of the deceased's family," said ICCR director-general Virender Gupta.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Wife-unaware-Kabul-his-last-stage/articleshow/5625887.cms
 

Bhagat Singh

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My prayers are with families of the deceased.

If Taliban wants fight with India then we should not hesitate and take them on squarely.

India should send combat soilders to Afghanistan with full armour and help Afghanistan government eridicate these people and give Pakistan bloody nose in process.
 

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Firstly, RIP to the victims who were brave enough to go to Afghanistan and do their duty for the country. Condolences to their families.

I don't know when will our Indian leaders will understand the games played evil pakistani establishment. There is no real sincerety in Pakistani establishment to talk to India. All they do is beg and pressure for the talks and when India accedes they will do a attack on India and Indian targets.

During Lahore summit - Musharaff was planning for Kargil

When Foreign minister quereshi was in Delhi for talks - 26/11 mumbai attacks happened.

Now when India acceded for talks - Pune attacks happened and despite that when India went ahead and invited the Pakistani foreign minister, there is an attack on Indians in Afghanistan.

It seems that Pakistani establishment need the Indian bogey to sustain themselves and their cabal.

There is nothing going to come out of talks with these pigs. The only way is to destroy and annihilate their military and squeeze their b**lls by denying water. But then, Indian leaders with their spineless and b**lless attitude are not going to do anything and sit on their arses while Indian are killed and maimed ruthlessly. When are we going to payback these idiots in the same coin.
 

Yusuf

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RIP to the fallen.

I think its time we do send in our troops to protect our interests. We cannot be sitting ducks for the terrorists. The Taliban has shown great "courage" by killing unarmed people.

India cannot lose anymore men there. Its time the government stops issuing routine statements after any attacks on Indian interest and lodge meaningless "protests" with the countries responsible and take action on its own. The Pakistanis are doing some deft diplomacy with other countries as well to get India out from Astan. India has to wake up from its usual slumber and take quick action.
 

ajtr

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Blast part of effort to drive India out?

NEW DELHI: Damayanti Behn and Sunita Kumari were out when the Taliban assault team burst into their room in Kabul on Friday morning, shooting on the bed, under the bed, and in the wardrobe. They would have shot Basharat Pathan but let him go when they heard his name, thinking he was an Afghan, not aware Pathan is a famous name among Gujarati Muslims.

These three Indians are members of SEWA, a non-profit organisation, and they are in Afghanistan running a project by which they train war widows, orphans and destitutes to become earning members of society. They were lucky. Major Deepak Yadav of the Army Education Corps was not. He was in Afghanistan to teach English to its security personnel, but the Taliban got him.

Major Jyotin Singh, unarmed, of the Army Medical Corps, working in the Indira Gandhi children's hospital, grappled with the suicide bomber forcing him to detonate himself outside the Arya guesthouse. This gave others nearby to run for cover and save themselves. But the Major from Manipur fell.

Bhola Ram, deputy general manager of Power Grid Corporation who was on his last month in Kabul, having completed the high-profile Pul-e-Khumri transmission link, was also killed.

As India brought back the bodies of nine of its citizens from Kabul on Sarturday, there is a growing sense that it is part of a concerted effort by Pakistan and its Taliban proxies to get India out of Afghanistan. The Taliban attack on Arya guesthouse, Park Residence and Safi Landmark Hotel in central Kabul also comes a day after the first foreign secretaries' talks between India and Pakistan.

Meanwhile, PM Manmohan Singh asked President Hamid Karzai on Saturday to ensure safety and security of all Indians in Afghanistan. Karzai had called Singh to condole the attack. A special Indian Air Force plane carrying the bodies of six of the Indians killed in the Kabul terror attack arrived on Saturday evening at the Palam air base, where President Pratibha Patil attended the wreath-laying ceremony.

Who did it and why? Indian and Afghan intelligence are already at work, said sources. India has now suffered three major attacks against it in 20 months. The first attack, in July 2008, was by the Haqqani network, said sources. The second, in October 2009, was by a combination of Haqqani and Lashkar-e-Taiba.

After Taliban spokesperson Zabiullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for Friday's attack, the needle of suspicion has pointed to the Haqqani network, and their sponsors, Pakistan's ISI. This was confirmed by the US director of national intelligence, Dennis Blair, on February 2, when he told the US Senate that Pakistan "has continued to provide support to its militant proxies, such as Haqqani Taliban, Gul Bahadur group, and Commander Nazir group."

According to security sources here, the assault was very much India-centric, which has raised many questions among security officials.

In recent weeks, particularly at the Nato conference in Brussels, the London and Istanbul meetings, Pakistan has been relatively clear that it wants to see the back of India in Afghanistan. This message was made clear by the Pakistan army chief on February 2 to foreign journalists.

Former diplomat G Parthasarathy said, "There should be no doubt about ISI involvement, and even incitement of this attack. Sadly, we learn no lessons from our past experience."

It may be too far-fetched to draw a link between the recent India-Pakistan talks and the blast. But it may be part of Pakistan's new mindset that with the US needing it more and more in Afghanistan, they feel they can advance their agenda regarding India without any significant costs. Parthasarathy said, "Pakistani officials are gloating at what they claim is US pressure which compels us to the dialogue table."

But terrorism analyst B Raman points to the possibility of a Pune-Kabul link, whether it could have been a follow-up to the Pune attack of February 13. "The investigation into the Pune blast has not yet made much headway. It has not yet been clearly established who carried it out. The LeT is among the suspects. The possibility of a linkage between the Pune and Kabul incidents has to be kept in view during the investigation. If such a linkage ultimately emerges, that would indicate a new jihadi offensive by LeT against Indian nationals and interests not only in India, but also in Afghanistan and possibly in Bangladesh and the Maldives too in the months to come."
 

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Kabul attack similar to 26/11 Mumbai strike: Investigators

NEW DELHI: The terror attack in Kabul was on the pattern of the 26/11 Mumbai carnage, with six to eight terrorists targeting two hotels and hunting for victims during the strike in which nine Indians were killed.

Investigators suspect involvement of the Taliban, particularly the Haqqani group, in league with elements of Lashkar-e Taiba in Friday's assault, sources said.

The attack was carried out in a coordinated manner with the terrorists first exploding bombs and then launching the armed assault, hunting for the targets, particularly the members of the Indian medical mission, a pattern seen in Mumbai during the 26/11 attack, they said.

About six to eight terrorists are suspected to have been involved in the assault at around 6.30 am at the Park Residence Hotel and adjacent Noor guest house, where Indians on transit usually stay, the sources said.

Two or three of the attackers might have been killed in the gunfight with Afghan security forces, they said.

Two major-rank officers of the army were among the nine Indians killed and some others, including five army officers, were injured in the assault.

The terrorists targeted those Indians who were engaged in helping Afghan people and building partnership between the two countries, Indian Ambassador Jayant Prasad said.

He said those targeted were earning goodwill for India by bringing the people of the two countries closer through their developmental efforts.

"It is the handiwork of enemies of Afghan people and friendship between people of India and Afghanistan," Prasad said and asserted that these attempts would not deter India from pursuing its goal of helping Afghanistan.

Taliban, at the behest of Pakistan's intelligence agency ISI, has been expressing opposition to India's developmental works in Afghanistan. They have been demanding that India should end its presence in Afghanistan.

The sources said the attack reflected a change of pattern by Taliban terrorists, as this time they went for the soft targets, unlike the protected installations and persons as in the past.

Yesterday's attack was the fourth on Indian interests in Afghanistan since July 2008 when a car laden with 100 kgs of explosives was blown up at the gate of Indian Embassy, killing 60 people, including four Indians -- a Brigadier-rank officer, a senior IFS officer and two ITBP personnel.

In October last year, terrorists struck again at the Embassy, carrying out a car bomb explosion near its outer wall and killing 17 people.

Subsequently, in December, a hotel housing staff of an Indian IT company was targeted. Eight people were killed and two IT executives, an Indian cook and a cleaner were among those injured.
 

ajtr

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The Kabul test

The terrorists who struck at guesthouses in Kabul on Friday were primarily targeting Indian citizens and foreigners. As Jayant Prasad, India’s ambassador to Afghanistan, told this newspaper, “They went from room to room with Kalashnikovs and killed foreigners.” This is the third major strike against Indians in Kabul, after attacks on the Indian embassy in July 2008 and then in October 2009. In both the earlier incidents, enough leads were picked up to suspect the involvement of Pakistan-based groups like the Lashkar-e-Toiba. This time too the LeT is a prime suspect. Investigators should soon get a clear idea of the perpetrators. However, profiles of the Indians killed on Friday provide an understanding of

the provocation the terrorists intend in a year that could change Afghanistan.

Among those killed: Major Laishram Jyotin Singh (who courageously tried to overpower one of the suicide bombers), who was providing medical assistance; Major Deepak Yadav, who was teaching English at the Afghan Military Academy; Nawab Khan, a tabla player, who was part of a troupe sent to Kabul by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations; Bhola Ram, an engineer; Nitish Chibber, a staffer at the Kandahar consulate. Their deaths highlight the difficult circumstances in which Indians have been working to build long-term local capabilities in post-2001 Afghanistan: in education, health services, infrastructure (the construction of roads, power transmission lines, even the parliament building) — and as SEWA’s statement of resolve to persist with its activities in Afghanistan shows, in imparting livelihood training. Together, they provide a measure of India’s commitment to nation-building in Afghanistan. And the diversity of non-military ways in which local infrastructure and human skills are being upgraded has been vital to India’s strategic gains and goodwill in that country. However, the repeated attacks on Indian targets show the vulnerability of Indian personnel. After the embassy strikes, measures were taken to revamp security and create residential complexes. Yet the fact that military officers were housed in guesthouses indicates that these measures need to be expedited.This is a pivotal year in Afghanistan. Determined diplomacy must be sustained by dogged preparedness. Efforts to guard our people must be reassessed, and provocations like Friday’s countered with a redoubling of their good works. It is not just that Afghanistan is crucial to combating terrorism directed at this country. It is also that this unique form of diplomacy and non-military assistance to Afghanistan is being tested for India’s stamina and heart to play the big power game — and to play it on its own terms.
 

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