Western nations coerce developing countries on Climate Change

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by hello_10, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    sir, first you would get to know that Climate Change deal, and its negotiations may finally lead to a WW3, Im not sure, but their full strength will certainly be exercised to get something done in this regard, as soon as they can..........

    and from here, please post #2 to get to know that these western newspapers were in fact hopeful to have a pact even during Durban Climate talk, held in november 2011....

    and then turn the post #3 of mine, with 'Washington Post' stating about UN's chief about the 'main' country, which didn't let this Climate Deal go through.....
     
  2. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    One of the most recognized way of measuring Carbon Emission level is about "GDP on PPP per ton of Carbon Emission". we have the list based on this criterion is as below. here we may have a pact based on reaching GDP on PPP at $3000 per ton of Carbon Emission within a time limit, say. but here Developed countries do need to help the Developing countries to get this target, say by 2030 :thumb:

    List of countries by ratio of GDP to carbon dioxide emissions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  3. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    China backs developing countries to combat Climate Change :china:
    Xinhua, December 5, 2012

    China has devoted substantial resources to helping developing countries deal with the severe challenges posed by climate change, a senior Chinese official said on Tuesday.

    The country has earmarked 200 million U.S. dollars for this cause over a period of three years, Xie Zhenhua, head of China's delegation to the ongoing UN climate talks in Doha, Qatar, said. :thumb:

    The funds will be used to finance climate programs in Africa, the least developed countries and small island countries, Xie, also deputy director of China's National Development and Reform Commission, added. :thumb:

    Some developing countries have made remarkable progress in improving energy efficiency with China's help, said Xie.

    For example, Grenada, a small island country in the Caribbean, has halved its energy consumption and saved 1 million dollars in public spending by using Chinese-provided energy-saving technologies and equipment, according to the Chinese official. :china:

    China has also offered training programs on climate change to hundreds of officials and technicians from other developing countries and the number will reach 2,000 in the next two years, he added.

    The Chinese efforts, part of developing countries' drive to promote so-called South-South cooperation on climate change, was welcomed by international deputies at the Doha climate talks.

    Tewolde Berhan, director-general of Ethiopia's Environmental Protection Authority, praised China's contribution to the South-South cooperation, citing China's support for his country's hydropower development as an example.

    Helen Clark, administrator of the United Nations Development Programme, said at a meeting held on the sidelines of the Doha climate talks that South-South cooperation is important for environment protection and the fight against global warming.

    China backs developing countries to combat climate change: official - China.org.cn
     
  4. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Talks on climate change in Bonn fail with disagreement over developing nations efforts' to curb emissions
    May 4, 2013

    New, more flexible ways to fight climate change were sketched out on Friday at the end of a week of talks between 160 nations, but there was no breakthrough in bridging a deep divide between China and the United States.

    The meeting of senior officials in Bonn, Germany, aired formulas to resolve disputes between rich and poor on sharing out the burden of curbing greenhouse gas emissions as part of a new U.N. deal, a successor to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.

    Attempts to reach agreement have foundered above all on a failure to agree on the contribution developing countries should make to curbing the industrial emissions responsible for global warming. The next ministerial conference to try to reach a deal is scheduled for Paris in 2015. :thumb:

    The United States, recently overtaken by China as the world's biggest carbon polluter, never ratified Kyoto because it set no binding emissions cuts for rapidly growing economies such as China and India.

    The United Nations said there was a broad agreement among delegates in Bonn that any new accord should have flexibility to ratchet up curbs on emissions, without a need for further negotiations, if scientific findings about floods, droughts and rising sea levels worsen in coming years.

    That approach would be a big shift from the Kyoto Protocol, which binds about 35 industrialised nations to cut greenhouse gases, with targets set every few years.

    "There's been quite a lot of common ground appearing," said Christiana Figueres, head of the U.N. Climate Change Secretariat. But she said no nation was doing enough to combat global warming.

    "The agreement of 2015 cannot be cast in stone, cannot be frozen in time," she said of the idea of greater flexibility.

    Some developed nations also suggested that a deal should have mechanisms, perhaps linked to per capita gross domestic product, so that governments in emerging nations would make bolder actions as their economies grew.

    Governments agreed in 2010 to limit a rise in temperatures to no more than 2 Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times but are far off target. Economic slowdown has sapped many countries' willingness to act on climate change.


    Mercury rises

    Temperatures have already risen about 0.8 C (1.4F) and many leading scientists say the 2C target is slipping out of reach. A U.N. panel says it is at least 90 percent certain that man-made greenhouse gases are the main cause of warming.

    There were no breakthroughs in Bonn, with tougher decisions put off at least until a next session in June.

    Developing nations said rich countries appeared unwilling to keep promises to take the lead in cutting emissions, and called for more focus on burden-sharing to safeguard the interests of the poor.

    "If we fail to act now, a vastly more expensive response will be required later," a group of 83 of the least developed nations and small island states said in a statement.

    China and the United States showed little indication of closer cooperation despite agreeing last month to step up efforts on climate change, saying they hoped that would inspire action by others.

    China stuck to its insistence that developed nations should collectively cut greenhouse gas emissions by between 25 and 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2020. President Barack Obama's plan is the equivalent of a 4 percent cut.

    The United States won some support for a suggestion that the 2015 deal should be based on national promises of action, while China wants far more binding commitments by the rich.

    Chinese chief negotiator Su Wei also said China could not impose caps on its rising emissions because it needed time to focus on economic growth, despite U.S. calls for tougher action by Beijing.

    "In China the per capita income is just around $5,000, compared to the industrialised countries where you have $40,000 or even more," he said.

    Talks on climate change in Bonn fail with disagreement over developing nations efforts' to curb emissions : Europe, News - India Today
     
  5. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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  6. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Progressives are using their old tactics of controlling the lives of others, using any excuse.

    By the way, I'm glad to find a subject on which to agree with @hello_10.
     
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  7. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    its a very crucial issue right now. i have wealth of experience with the western politicians and i find, they may go for even world war on this issue.... credibility of West on free fall, they may get back their industrial/manufacturing jobs from china by 2018/20, as i hope, and they know the meaning of Carbon binding in that certain case.......

    no matter how much Aid you offer to the developing countries, they just can't commit suicide by signing a pact which will never let them become a developed nation....... its the Energy Consumption Per Capita which means for a developed country, and no developing country would like to be bound on a limit, which is not similar to at least Middle Order Countries :nono:. similarly how P5, the WW2 winners, have got all the nuclear holding/Veto Power etc, as they were in that position after winning WW2. the reason why we find UK/France among P5, while Germany/Japan couldnt get that status because of being losers......

    and this is how Indian side would respond to US+EU as below: :ranger:

     
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  8. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    UN Climate Change Negotiations 2012: Developed countries not made any commitment on further reduction in emissions
    Dec 3, 2012

    DOHA: Developed countries have not made any commitment on finance or further reduction in emissions, drawing sharp criticism from developing nations and hindering success at the UN sponsored climate change negotiations in Doha.

    Industrialised countries maintained near silence on any commitment to provide funds to developing countries beyond broad statements that "climate financing would be available".

    "There will be no announcement of a single funding by the EU-27, but individual members are expected to make announcements on climate finance. The European Commission will find money for climate finance in the interim period," EU Commissioner for Climate Change Connie Hedegaard said in Doha.

    The United States was also not forthcoming. US negotiator Todd Stern said that the US had provided $7.5 billion even in what were "challenging fiscal times."

    At a previous conference in Durban, countries agreed to bring to a close ongoing negotiations to begin work on a post 2020 global climate regime. This would mean a second phase of the Kyoto Protocol with developed countries taking on emission reduction targets, and a satisfactory resolution of various critical issues such as finance, technology and shared vision.

    However, at the start of the second and final week of Doha negotiations being attended by nearly 200 countries saw developing countries up in arms over the text prepared by the chair of the Bali track of the negotiations. The chair's text produced as an "input to the informal consultations on the agreed outcome" failed to address key issues like financial and technological support to developing countries to address climate change. The text, did however address issues that developed countries consider to be crucial such as long-term goal and the when global emissions need to peak. This would mean that key issues like provision of support in the form of finance and technology in the period before 2020 would be left unresolved.

    The developing country bloc, G-77 and China, as well as other groupings such as the Like minded developing countries which includes India, China, Philippines, the Africa Group, and the ALBA group of Latin American countries "strongly condemned the absence of any reference in the text to issues of support-finance and technology.

    Developing countries like India and China have consistently stressed that developed countries need to provide climate finance and commit to higher emission reduction targets in the pre-2020 period.The developing country bloc G-77 and China has put a figure of $60 billion for the period 2013-15 as climate funding.:china: Till now there has been no clear indication on finance while developed countries have made clear that they are not open to taking on higher emission reduction efforts.

    The lack of clarity on the $30 billion provided by the developed countries as fast start finance between 2009-12 doesn't inspire confidence in the developing countries. China's head of delegation Xie Zhenhua said, "China will have a open and flexible attitude towards the negotiations and is willing to discuss all kinds of questions. But the developing countries have to see the money. I have heard three accounts of the money that has been disbursed under the fast start finance--$30billion, $26.3billion and $1.3 billion. The developing countries would like to see more detailed information about this money--which country paid and who received the money, how was the money used."

    The industrialised countries however maintain that commitment of $30 billion has been met. Hedegaard said, "we have delivered on fast start finance which not a small thing considering the economic condition."

    Countries like India and China have consistently stressed that they are not opposed to bring the Bali track of negotiations to a close provided that all crucial issues like higher emission reduction targets by developed countries in the pre-2020 period, finance, adaptation, equity, intellectual property rights are addressed or carried over for discussion in the appropriate body under the Convention.:thumb:

    UN Climate Change Negotiations 2012: Developed countries not made any commitment on further reduction in emissions - Economic Times
     
  9. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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  10. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    i do expect few comments by other members on this topic, just no response on this so crucial issue?????
     
  11. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    i do expect some contributions, thoughts/ findings, from other members in this thread. i may keep bringing the news but we do need to discuss them also :ranger:
     
  12. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    China gets tough on carbon
    12 June 2013

    China, responsible for about one-quarter of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions, has ambitious goals to reduce them — but has been unwilling to set absolute targets for fear of slowing economic growth. There are now signs that its position is changing.

    On 18 June, the country will launch an emissions-trading scheme in the southern city of Shenzhen, marking its first attempt to cut emissions using market mechanisms. Under the scheme, more than 630 industrial and construction companies will be given quotas for how much carbon dioxide they can emit. Companies that pollute more than they are allowed will have to buy credits from cleaner counterparts that reduce emissions below their quota — thereby creating a price for the greenhouse gas. :china:

    Another six such cap-and-trade schemes will be rolled out by the end of the year in the cities of Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai and Chongqing, and the provinces of Guangdong and Hubei. The trial will cover 864 million tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2015 — around 7% of China’s total emissions and about the total amount emitted by Germany each year, according to a report by the London-based analyst firm Bloomberg New Energy Finance. These regional pilot schemes will set the stage for the nationwide carbon market that is scheduled to launch in 2016.

    China has committed to cutting its carbon intensity — carbon emissions per unit of gross domestic product — by 40–45% of 2005 levels by 2020, which allows for increases in emissions, although at a slower rate. The initial emissions limits for the regional schemes will be set by applying the carbon-intensity targets to the emissions of individual companies. In 2016, this system will be scaled up nationally, again in line with carbon- intensity targets. :china:

    After 2020, this plan is likely to be replaced with an absolute cap that would require a decline in overall emissions covered under the scheme. Such a move will depend on the effectiveness of an array of planned energy policies, researchers say. “It’s not difficult from a technical point of view,” says Xiang Gao, a member of China’s climate-talks delegation and a researcher at China’s National Development and Reform Committee (NDRC), the power-ful ministry responsible for planning the country’s economic and social development. “It’s a matter of political will — which, in turn, will depend on whether the top leadership can be convinced that such a move is best for the country’s economy and social stability,” Gao says.

    Researchers say that China has reasons beyond climate change to implement emission caps. In the past few years, rampant air pollution has caused increased public resentment and social unrest across the country. “China may not have a choice any more,” says Knut Alfsen, head of research at the Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research in Oslo. “It’s just much better to control total emissions.”

    A commitment from China to cap emissions “would breathe new life into climate talks”, adds Alfsen, who is also a member of the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development, an international think tank that works closely with China’s cabinet and the NDRC. At the next climate-change summit, in Paris in 2015, nearly 200 countries will aim to reach a legally binding global agreement on emissions cuts, which would take effect in 2020. Kelly Sims Gallagher, an expert on energy and environmental policy at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, says that an ambitious emissions cap from China “would send a strong political signal to the world” and would make it easier to pass more aggressive climate legislation in the United States, where there is strong political resistance to national climate regulations.

    Most researchers contacted by Nature are only cautiously optimistic that China can cap its emissions. A carbon ceiling for China “depends in part on how successful the pilot schemes will be”, says Lei Ming, an environmental economist at Peking University in Beijing. “We will have to cross the river by feeling the stones,” he says, citing the famous one-liner by the late reformist leader Deng Xiaoping.

    One of the main challenges for the nationwide cap-and-trade scheme will be establishing its credibility. Verifying emissions, for instance, will be difficult in such a large country, says Gallagher. David Yuetan Tang, board secretary of the Tianjin Climate Exchange, which is in charge of one of the seven pilot emission-trading schemes, says that there is an institutional void about who will do this — and also a legal void about how companies will be punished for fraudulent claims or emissions excesses. “This is absolutely paramount, because emission quotas are money,” he adds.

    Moreover, whether emissions trading can work under China’s political system remains to be seen, critics say. “The energy market in China is not entirely free and has a lot of government interference and monopoly,” says Qi Ye, an environmental-policy researcher at Tsinghua University and director of the Beijing office of the international think tank Climate Policy Initiative. The price of electricity, for instance, is heavily controlled, he says, which could seriously diminish the impact of imposing a carbon price on electricity producers.

    Emissions trading is just one of a series of energy and pollution policies due to be introduced in the next few years. For instance, Beijing is considering implementing a carbon tax to rein in pollution by sectors not covered by cap and trade, and continues to invest aggressively in renewable energy. It has also pledged to reduce the production and use of hydrofluoro-carbons, powerful greenhouse gases used in refrigeration and air conditioning. :china:

    China gets tough on carbon : Nature News & Comment
     
  13. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Africans Unite Against New Form of Colonialism
    Mar 30, 2013

    Outraged by the rampant land grabs and neocolonialism of REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest degradation), Africans at the World Social Forum in Tunisia took the historic decision to launch the No REDD in Africa Network and join the global movement against REDD. :thumb:

    REDD+ is a carbon offset mechanism whereby industrialized Northern countries use forests, agriculture, soils and even water as sponges for their pollution instead of reducing greenhouse gas emissions at source. :rsk:

    “REDD is no longer just a false solution but a new form of colonialism,” denounced Nnimmo Bassey, Alternative Nobel Prize Laureate, former Executive Director of ERA/Friends of the Earth Nigeria. “In Africa, REDD+ is emerging as a new form of colonialism, economic subjugation and a driver of land grabs so massive that they may constitute a continent grab.We launch the No REDD in Africa Network to defend the continent from carbon colonialism.”
    In the UN-REDD Framework Document, the United Nations itself admits that REDD could result in the “lock-up of forests,” “loss of land” and “new risks for the poor.”

    REDD originally just included forests but its scope has been expanded to include soils and agriculture. In a teach-in session yesterday at the World Social Forum Tunis, members of the La Via Campesina, the world’s largest peasant movement, were concerned that REDD projects in Africa would threaten food security and could eventually cause hunger.

    A recent Via Campesina study on the N’hambita REDD project in Mozambique found that thousands of farmers were paid meager amounts for seven years for tending trees, but that because the contract is for 99 years, if the farmer dies his or her children and their children must tend the trees for free. “This constitutes carbon slavery,” denounced the emerging No REDD in Africa Network. The N’hambita project was celebrated by the UN on the website for Rio+20, the Earth Summit held in Rio de Janeiro last year.

    Mercia Andrews, Rural Women’s Assembly of Southern Africa urged “We as Africans need to go beyond the REDD problem to forging a solution.The last thing Africa needs is a new form of colonialism.”

    Africans from Nigeria, South Africa, Mali, Niger, Senegal, Mozambique, Tunisia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya and Tanzania participated in the launch of the No REDD in Africa Network.

    According the The New York Times, over 22,000 farmers with land deeds were violently evicted for a REDD-type project in Uganda in 2011 and Friday Mukamperezida, an eight-year-old boy was killed when his home was burned to the ground.

    REDD and carbon forest projects are resulting in massive evictions, servitude, slavery, persecutions, killings, and imprisonment, according to the nascent No REDD in Africa Network. :facepalm:

    “The Global Alliance of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities on Climate Change against REDD and for Life hails the birth of the NO REDD in Africa Network. This signals a growing resistance against REDD throughout the world,” Tom Goldtooth, Director of the Indigenous Environmental Network. “We know REDD could cause genocide and we are delighted that the Africans are taking a stand to stop what could be the biggest land grab of all time.”

    Africans Unite Against New Form of Colonialism | Indigenous Environmental Network
     
  14. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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  15. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Warsaw climate change talks falter as EU and developing countries clash
    22 November 2013

    EU chief chastised for expressing frustration with failure to agree timetable on emission cuts and attempts by some to opt out

    United Nations talks on climate change were on the brink of breaking down on Friday as a group of developing countries launched a furious attack on the European Union over plans to set out a timetable towards a global deal on greenhouse gas emissions.

    Rows over whether rich countries should pay compensation to the poor for the effects of climate change, and over how governments can move to a historic global deal on emissions, have disrupted the fortnight-long talks, which have been marked by walk-outs and recriminations.

    As the talks dragged on into the night, the EU's climate chief, Connie Hedegaard, expressed frustration with the failure to agree a timetable on emissions cuts, and with attempts by a small number of developing countries to opt out of the proposal.

    In a dramatic intervention late on Friday, Venezuela's head of delegation, representing a group of "like-minded countries" including China, India, Saudi Arabia and Malaysia, accused the EU of "damaging seriously the atmosphere of confidence and trust in this process".:ranger: Claudia Salerno said: "We are shocked by the brazen attack against our group by Hedegaard – it is incredible that she has chosen to accuse our group of blocking progress."

    Talks had been inching towards a conclusion, with participants reporting "productive" meetings and "modest progress". The negotiations were meant to lay the groundwork for a crunch meeting in Paris in late 2015, at which governments are supposed to sign a new global treaty on climate change, to come into force from 2020, which would be the first to include commitments on emissions from both developed and developing nations.

    Before this can happen, it is crucial thatall countries set out national targets on emissions well in advance of the Paris talks, so that other participants can assess the targets – which would lay out cuts into the 2020s and beyond – and can see whether they are sufficiently ambitious to head off dangerous levels of climate change.

    The US, the EU and many other rich and poor countries see such a programme as essential. But as the talks dragged on into extra time in Poland's national football stadium on Friday night, there was still no consensus.

    Salerno's outburst underlined the fractious nature of the talks, and the new divisions between some rapidly emerging economies, some of them with large fossil fuel interests, and other developing countries that have more to lose from the effects of climate change.

    The spokesman for Hedegaard said some countries wanted to portray the talks as divided between the developed and developing world. "It's not like that. It is the willing versus the unwilling."

    The EU and US are also anxious to ensure that rapidly growing economies – especially China, which is now the world's biggest emitter of C02 and second biggest economy – take on responsibilities for their emissions, which they did not under the Kyoto protocol.

    In another strand, the highly contentious issue of "loss and damage", by which developing countries stricken by the effects of severe weather would receive assistance, was moving towards compromise.

    That would involve a mechanism for channelling funds to vulnerable countries when they suffer natural disasters related to global warming. This is very different from the "compensation" that some developing countries want from the rich world, and which rich countries have ruled out, but they may accept this compromise as it would allow them to receive funding when disaster strikes.

    Ed Davey, the UK's energy and climate secretary, said: "I think we will be able to reconcile these views."

    Warsaw climate change talks falter as EU and developing countries clash | Environment | The Guardian
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2013
  16. I_PLAY_BAD

    I_PLAY_BAD Regular Member

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    India must not accept to legally binding emission cuts.
    Global warming is predominantly due to developed/industrialized nations and they are responsible for reducing it.
    India can contribute but not at the cost of her development.
    Developed nations are trying to put a check on the developing nations so that their hegemony extends for few more decades and India gaining collective support from all other parties must oppose this seriously.
    What happened to the $100 Billion in aid and technology transfer to support poor nations to tacke Global warming?
    If developed nations do not act fast then the end of human civilization is imminent.
     

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