Small arms of India

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by A.V., Oct 11, 2009.

  1. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    Re: INSAS Rifle, LMG & Carbine

    This Thread is exclusively for side arms mate,,,,,,,,
     
  2. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    everyone love X95 so do i, but anyone has care to check how much does it cost, small example is that scope for X95 cost 1400 USD. Just imagine what rifle along with scope cost.
     
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  3. shom

    shom Regular Member

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  4. shom

    shom Regular Member

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  5. shom

    shom Regular Member

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  6. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    We have developed in a good pace for assauolt rifles and carbines ,,, but what about our side arms Kunal Da,,, we should try our hands in it. Because after Browning High Power we dont even produced any side arms under licence also. What a shame. We must research on a very effective side arm.
     
  7. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    My favorite crew weapon, no longer issued to tankers.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    For my Favorite Ewald Sir,,,
    M3 submachine gun
    The M3 was an American .45-caliber submachine gun adopted for U.S. Army service on 12 December 1942, as the United States Submachine Gun, Cal. .45, M3.[5] Compared to the Thompson submachine gun, the M3 was cheaper to produce, lighter, more accurate, and was also chambered in .45 ACP.[5] The M3 was commonly referred to as the "Grease Gun" or simply "the Greaser", owing to its visual similarity to the mechanic's tool.[6]
    Intended as a replacement for the .45-caliber Thompson series of submachine guns, the M3 and its improved successor, the M3A1 began to replace the Thompson in first-line service in late 1944 and early 1945. Due to delays caused by production issues and approved specification changes, the M3/M3A1 saw relatively little combat use in World War II.
    Design details

    The M3 was an automatic, air-cooled blowback-operated weapon that fired from an open bolt. Constructed of plain .060-in. thick sheet steel, the M3 receiver was stamped in two halves that were then welded together.[5] The M3 was striker-fired, with a fixed firing pin contained inside the bolt. The bolt was drilled longitudinally to support two parallel guide rods, upon which were mounted twin return (recoil) springs. This configuration allowed for larger machining tolerances while providing operating clearance in the event of dust, sand, or mud ingress.[17] The M3 featured a spring-loaded extractor which was housed inside the bolt head, while the ejector was located in the trigger group.[18] Like the British Sten, time and expense was saved by cold-swaging the M3's barrel.[5]
    [edit]Operating mechanism


    A diagram of the M3 illustrating function.
    The M3 operating sequence is as follows: the bolt is cocked to the rear using the cocking handle located on the right side of the ejector housing. When the trigger is pulled, the bolt is driven forward by the recoil springs, stripping a round from the feed lips of the magazine and guiding the round into the chamber. The bolt then continues forward and the firing pin strikes the cartridge primer, igniting the round, resulting in a high-pressure impulse, forcing the bolt back against the resistance of the recoil springs and the inertial mass of the bolt. By the time the bolt and empty casing have moved far enough to the rear to open the chamber, the bullet has left the barrel and pressure in the barrel has dropped to a safe level. The M3's comparatively low cyclic rate was a function of the relatively low pressure generated by the .45 ACP round, a heavy bolt, and recoil springs with a lighter-than-normal compression rate.[citation needed]
    [edit]Features


    M3 receiver markings
    The gun used metal stamping and pressing, spot welding and welding extensively in its construction, reducing the number of man-hours required to assemble a unit. Only the barrel, bolt and firing mechanism were precision machined. The receiver consisted of two sheet metal halves welded together to form a cylinder. At the front end was a knurled metal cap which was used to retain the removable barrel. The cold-swaged, rifled barrel had 4 right-hand grooves. M3 and M3A1 submachine guns could be fitted with an optional, detachable flash hider, though none saw any service in World War II.[19] A later production flash hider designated Hider, Flash M9 was produced in time to see service during the Korean War. It proved popular in combat, as frequent night engagements emphasized the need to reduce flash signatures on small arms. In Korea, U.S. soldiers equipped with automatic weapons were taught to look above the flash of their weapon during night firing, a tactic that sometimes prevented the detection of crawling enemy infiltrators and sappers.[citation needed]
    Projecting to the rear was a one-piece wire stock made from a formed steel rod that telescoped into tubes on both sides of the receiver. Both ends of the stock were tapped and drilled so that it could be used as a cleaning rod. It could also be used as a disassembly tool or as a wrench used to unscrew the barrel cap.[citation needed]
    The M3's Cocking handle assembly was located on the right-hand side of the receiver on the ejector housing, just forward and above the trigger, and consisted of nine parts.[17] As the handle is pulled to the rear, a pawl rises to engage a notch in the bottom of the bolt, pushing the bolt to the rear until it locked back on the sear.
    The fixed sights consisted of a rear aperture sight preset for firing at 100 yards (approximately 91 m) and a front blade foresight. All M3 submachine guns were test-fired for accuracy at a distance of 100 feet (30 m).[5] With the sights set at six-o'clock on a bullseye target, each gun was required to keep four out of five shots within or cut the edge of a three-inch (76 mm) bulls' eye to meet accuracy requirements.[5]
    The weapon's only safety was the hinged ejection port dust cover. This cover had a projection on the underside that engaged a notch on the bolt, locking it in either its forward or rearmost positions. The M3 had no mechanical means of disabling the trigger, and the insertion of a loaded magazine would load the gun. With receiver walls made of relatively thin-gauge sheet metal, the M3/M3A1 were subject to disabling damage if dropped on an open dust cover - the covers bent easily, negating the safety feature. Dropping the gun on a sharp or hard surface could dent the receiver enough to bind the bolt.[citation needed]
    The M3/M3A1's 30-round magazine was the source of complaint throughout the service life of the weapon.[20][21] Unlike the Thompson, the M3 fed from a double-column, single-feed detachable box magazine which held 30 rounds and was patterned after the British Sten magazine; the single-feed design proved difficult to load by hand, and was more easily jammed by mud, dust, and dirt than double-column, double-feed designs like the Thompson.[22] Additionally, the feed lips of the single-feed design proved more susceptible to feed malfunctions when slightly bent or damaged. Plastic dust caps were later issued to cover the feed end of the magazine and keep out dust as well as protect the sensitive feed lips
    Shooting the M3 Grease Gun - YouTube
    M3 ''Grease Gun'' Shooting by SkilledAmateur - YouTube
     
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  9. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Sir, I picture you with a swagger stick. :)



    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Abhi9

    Abhi9 Regular Member

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  11. Somreet Bhattacharya

    Somreet Bhattacharya Regular Member

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    @Kunal Sir: As for the sterling..isn't it pretty bulky with the silencer on when it come to maneuvering in closed places...??
     
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  12. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    If you ask my view I would say that though it is heavier than any of the carbines at present and it is bulky too,, but it is not at all expensive and the officers and JCOs have used it for many years so they have lots of experiences and practice which makes them perfect. On the war field I dont think that it will matter much as the mass and bulkiness would be equalized with the experience. The Indian Army uses its sterlings as parts of their body....
     
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  13. shom

    shom Regular Member

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  14. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    Beretta 92:-
    [​IMG]
    screenshot windows
    The Beretta 92 (also Beretta 96 and Beretta 98) is a series of semi-automatic pistols designed and manufactured by Beretta of Italy. The model 92 was designed in 1972 and production of many variants in different calibers continues today. The United States Armed Forces replaced the Model 1911A1 .45 ACP pistol in 1985 with the military spec Beretta 92F, the M9.
    Although only 5,000 copies of the original design were manufactured from 1975 to 1976, the design is currently produced in four different configurations (FS, G, D and DS) and four calibers:
    92 series in 9×19mm Parabellum
    96 series in .40 S&W
    98 series in 9×21mm IMI
    98 and 99 series in 7.65mm Luger
    History

    The Beretta 92 pistol evolved from earlier Beretta designs, most notably the M1922 and M1951. From the M1922 comes the open slide design, while the alloy frame and locking block barrel (originally from Walther P38) were first used in the M1951. The grip angle and the front sight integrated with the slide were also common to earlier Beretta pistols. Perhaps the Model 92's two most important advanced design features appeared on its immediate predecessor, the 1974 .380 caliber Model 84. These improvements both involved the magazine, which featured direct feed, that is, there was no feed ramp between the magazine and the chamber (a Beretta innovation in pistols), and the magazine was a "double-stacked" high capacity design - a feature originally introduced in 1935 on the 9mm FN/Browning "Hi-Power".[1]
    The Beretta 92 first appeared in 1975[2] and was designed by Carlo Beretta, Giuseppe Mazzetti and Vittorio Valle, all experienced firearms designers on the Beretta design team.
    [edit]92
    Production began in May 1976, and ended in February 1983. Approximately 7,000 units were of the first "step slide" design and the rest were of the second "straight slide" type. The total production was 52,000. (Note: the total number of units produced as well as "step slide" units produced is frequently misquoted in other sources. For example: 1. Blue Book indicated total number produced as 5,000, a number 10 times smaller than actual production! 2. berettacollection.com website states "approx. 5000" to the number of "step slide" units produced which is close but off by a few thousand.)
    [edit]92S
    In order to meet requirements of some law enforcement agencies, Beretta modified the Beretta 92 by adding a slide-mounted combined safety and decocking lever, replacing the frame mounted manual thumb safety. This resulted in the 92S which was adopted by several Italian law enforcement and military units. The later relocation of the magazine release button means these models (92 & 92S) cannot necessarily use later magazines, unless they have notches in both areas.
    [edit]92SB (92S-1)
    The extremely rare 92SB, Initially called the 92S-1, was specifically designed for the USAF (US Air Force) trials (which it won), the model name officially adopted was the 92SB. It included the changes of the 92S, added a firing pin block (thus the addition of the "B" to the name), and relocated the magazine release catch from the bottom of the grip to the lower bottom of the trigger guard.
    92SB Compact (1981–1991), shortened barrel and slide (13-round magazine capacity). It was replaced by the "92 Compact L".
    [edit]92F (92SB-F)/92G
    Main article: M9 pistol
    Beretta modified the model 92SB slightly to create the 92SB-F (the "F" added to denote entry of the model in U.S. Government federal testing) and, later, the 92G for French Government testing, by making the following changes:
    Design of all the parts to make them 100% interchangeable to simplify maintenance for large government organizations.
    Modified the front of the trigger guard so that one could use finger support for easier aiming.
    Recurved the forward base of the grip to aid aiming.
    Hard chromed the barrel bore to protect it from corrosion and to reduce wear.
    New surface coating on the slide called Bruniton, which allegedly provides better corrosion resistance than the previous plain blued finish.
    [edit]92FS
    The FS has an enlarged hammer pin that fits into a groove on the underside of the slide. The main purpose is to stop the slide from flying off the frame to the rear if it cracks. This was in response to reported defective slides during U.S. Military testing.
    COurtesy:- wikipidia
     
  15. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    [​IMG]
    photo sharing websites @Kunal Biswas dada ,, which segment of the Indian Army uses Beretta 92FS? Couldnt find any details regarding this. Though I got this pic from Internet, i wonder this pic might have been taken in some joint exercises with United States.
     
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  16. shom

    shom Regular Member

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  17. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    That is a M9 of USMC, An exercise with Indian Army..

     
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  18. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    Yes, It is..

    Weight is not an big issue but its length is for sure..

     
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  19. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    When I visited in Equipments page of Indian Army in Wikipidia I found Beretta92 is used in indian army ,, whereas when I visited the beretta 92 page I found it is only used by our Manipur Police,,, Is it used by our army????
     
  20. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    Beretta handgun are not used by Indian Army nor Glocks..

    High-power all the way..
     

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