Siachen Glacier : The Highest battleground on Earth

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by A.V., Mar 11, 2009.

  1. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    [​IMG]

    Manning MMG post at siachen ..
     
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  2. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    See How our Brave soldiers are getting Drinking Water at Siachen Glacier
    #RESPECT
    #JAI_HIND

     
  3. captscooby81

    captscooby81 Senior Member Senior Member

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    :hail::hail: respect to them .. cant we airdrop them drinking water once a week . This looks so depressing .


     
  4. IBRIS

    IBRIS Senior Member Senior Member

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    I'm going to walk on the thin limb here, and admit that government or our armed forces are not equipping our jawans properly. They shouldn't be slipping on ice if they had proper spiked boots, the water should not be collected in gasoline cans instead should be in ice coolers or insulated backpacks so they don't have to carry those big gasoline cans on shoulders. They should have proper jack hammers, handheld drilling machines or chainsaws to cut ice. Someone is not thinking right somewhere and I think it's not the soldiers deployed on glacier it's those stubborn high ranking officers down bottom in there comfortable warm barracks.
     
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  5. SADAKHUSH

    SADAKHUSH Senior Member Senior Member

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    Someone should or I will try to send this to PMO ASAP. It is not acceptable as technology is available to drill for water instead of the tools they were using.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2017
  6. captscooby81

    captscooby81 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Plzzz do that but expect no response from is twitter handle better share it to Arnab s republic twitter handle if he share then sure PMO will see it .. This video might been a old one too we don't know things have improved but i will be little sceptical if they say things might have changed ....

     
  7. SADAKHUSH

    SADAKHUSH Senior Member Senior Member

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    I have a friend retired from Army and his son served on the posting at Siachen besides my brother in law and sister visited the troops. I will find out from them and take next step.
     
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  8. Prashant12

    Prashant12 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Soldiers At High Altitudes Can Now Feel Warm, Combat Frostbites

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    Soldiers sometimes have to be at high altitude with sub-zero temperatures for prolonged periods of time. To keep warm, they use a variety of strategies. This could include warm clothing, using heat packs, or electric blankets. But, they do not provide comprehensive solutions.


    While warm clothes do prevent loss of body heat, they fail to generate any heat on their own, hot water bottles fail to retain the heat for long durations and electric heating pads or blankets require electric supply which has a risk of causing skin burn and thus making them unfit for prolonged use.


    Now, scientists at the Defense Laboratory Jodhpur (DLJ), and the Indian Institute of Technology-Jodhpur (IITJ) have designed a new combination of previously known materials that could help save soldiers and those living in cold regions from adverse events such as frostbite and hypothermia.


    The scientists, have made this new combo-material using sodium acetate trihydrate and ethylene glycol that can retain significant amount of heat for long . The combo-material is a type of ‘phase change material’, that have been previously used for making thermal management devices for regulating human body temperature, reducing temperature fluctuations inside buildings, and for storing solar energy.


    Sodium acetate trihydrate is known to make efficient heat packs. But, it has several disadvantages. For example, it is hard and lumped, with sharp edges that makes it prone to puncture or damage during use. Also, it provides heat at nearly 57 degree Celsius as opposed to a temperature of 40degree Celsius, which is required to manage frostbites.

    The scientists at DLJ and IITJ have now found that it can be made more flexible and its heat retention time could be increased by about 10% by adding ethylene glycol and thus made suitable for thermal therapeutic applications like for frostbites.


    The scientists, Ambesh Dixit, Rohitash Kumar, SumitaVyas, and Ravindra Kumar have published their results in a recent issue of science journal Nature’s Scientific Reports.


    “Novel ethylene glycol and aqueous sodium acetate trihydrate composite phase change materials with enhanced thermo-physical properties have been designed and developed. It is a promising material for applications such as body warming, building heating under adverse conditions and seasonal solar thermal energy storage”, they said in their report.


    Mohammed Farid, professor at the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, New Zealand, who is not connected to the study but works with similar materials agrees that, “scientists have improved the performance of the materialthrough modifications. It will also make it more comfortable to use”, he says. (India Science Wire)

    http://theindiasaga.com/defence-sec...altitudes-can-now-feel-warm-combat-frostbites
     
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  9. Prashant12

    Prashant12 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Army jawan posted in Kargil and Siachen to get indigenous equipment soon


    New Delhi: Very soon Army personal deployed above 12000 feet from the sea level will be provided with Indigenous equipment which so far has been imported.

    Army posts in Siachen, Kargil and many more such places are above 12000 feet where they have to face extreme cold weather conditions. The government has been planning to purchase indigenous products from very long time. The indeginisation programme taken up by the ministry and the Army has been able to save money to the tune of Rs 250 to 300 crore per Annam to the government exchequer.

    Generally an Army personal are given special clothing above 9000 feet height but for the Army personnel posted at 12000 feet and above these clothing are necessary as they are life saving. Siachen, Nathu La, Bumla, East Laddakh and Kargil are some of areas where negotiating with the prevailing weather condition without these clothing and equipments are impossible.

    Army sources told One India that the government has to cough up Rs 600 to 800 crore on purchase of these special clothing and equipments so the process of Indigenisation was started by the government as both the government as well as the Army wanted to do this.

    The Army has adopted the revenue model for purchasing these cloths and equipments as these things are already being used by the Army. As per sources Thermal Insole, snow goggle, rucksack and face mask have already been Indegenised and now Extreme Cold Weather Clothing System (ECWCS) has to be Indegenised which was earlier made of animal fur that the news company is offering is made up of synthetic stuff. In two-three month's time they will be ready for the use of the Armed forces.

    Sources informed that for indgenisation of these products 23 firms participated in it with their products and in two days time reports will be out that which product has passed the required test, which has failed and why has any company failed the test? Every thing will be told to them.

    Army sources also informed that there are many other products that has to be indigenised and the Army is working on it. They are Modular Glovs, Tugger Shoes, Multi-Purpose Boot, Sleeping Bag, Cramp On and Carabina. To make these things indegenous system is being made transparent and soon every equipment will be indegenous. However, some other sources informed that some of the equipment are so specialised that making them by Indian companies will definitely take time before it is approved from the uses of Army.

    https://www.oneindia.com/india/army...en-get-indigenous-equipment-soon-2696303.html
     
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  10. zebra7

    zebra7 Regular Member

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    I tell you the 2 most important and vital thing required in sachin and can don't freezes.
    1. Xxx rum
    2. Kerosene

    The biggest enemy is the environment. And average weight loss is 15 kg after 6 month of deployment.
     
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  11. Moroboshi

    Moroboshi Regular Member

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    About time. Cold weather apparel are low hanging fruit that should have been made in India starting a long while back. It ain't rocket science. But of course no kickbacks to babus from Swiss or wherever the fuck we used to get them from before.
     
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  12. Prashant12

    Prashant12 Senior Member Senior Member

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    BRO constructs bridge to Siachen under Project HIMANK


    LEH: The Border Roads Organisation (BRO) today threw open a vital 35-meter bridge in Ladakh region of Jammu and Kashmir that will ease vehicular movement to the base camp of Siachen Glacier, the world's highest battlefield.

    "The BRO has removed a major travelling bottleneck in Leh by constructing a 35-meter long 'Chamesahn' bridge, under Project HIMANK, which will lead it to the base of Siachen Glacier," a spokesman of the BRO said.

    He said Project Himank successfully undertook the challenge of constructing the bridge on Khalsar-Sasoma road, an important axis connecting Nubra Valley to Siachen Glacier base.

    He said the bridge on Chamesahn Lungpa stream, which was completed in a limited working window, was possible due to meticulous planning, timely mobilization and innovative employment of resources.

    The spokesman said the increase in flow in Chamesahn Lungpa stream during summers and the movement of large volume of both tourist and military traffic over the existing temporary bailey bridge provided limited connectivity on Khalsar-Sasoma road.

    "The limitation has been overcome after BRO engineers and personnel built the bridge, which is the first among series of seven bridges to be constructed on Khalsar-Sasoma road. It has provided a major relief by improving traffic movement for local villagers and military personnel, besides tourists going to the scenic Panamik village," he said.

    The bridge was inaugurated by Lt Gen Harpal Singh, Director General Border Roads, and declared open for use by security forces and civilians of Leh-Ladakh region.

    General Singh, who is on a week-long visit to the Ladakh sector, addressed officers and subordinates of Project Himank and appreciated them for their grit and determination while maintaining these highest and most difficult roads.

    https://economictimes.indiatimes.co...under-project-himank/articleshow/64732773.cms
     
  13. Chinmoy

    Chinmoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Air drop drinking water in Siachen??? And then increase the load further on guys when they make a return to base camp?

    Cost effect is one factor which you need to keep in mind along with survival while delivering ration to posts like this.
     
  14. Chinmoy

    Chinmoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Ice coolers or insulated back pack sounds good, but as I said, increase load on individual soldiers. Moreover these kind of ice collection is not done too far from camps for Jerrycan are not a bad choice as optimum use of any asset at places like this is first priority for any soldier.

    As far as handheld drilling machine chainsaw or jack hammers are concerned, these are bad idea over here. I have seen simple torchlight and genset breaking down in couple of minutes at 15000 feet altitude.
     
  15. Manish Khan

    Manish Khan Regular Member

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    According to the latest news of The Economic Times:

    The Border Roads Organisation (BRO) today threw open a vital 35-meter bridge in Ladakh region of Jammu and Kashmir that will ease vehicular movement to the base camp of Siachen Glacier, the world's highest battlefield.

    "The BRO has removed a major travelling bottleneck in Leh by constructing a 35-meter long 'Chamesahn' bridge, under Project HIMANK, which will lead it to the base of Siachen Glacier," a spokesman of the BRO said.

    He said Project Himank successfully undertook the challenge of constructing the bridge on Khalsar-Sasoma road, an important axis connecting Nubra Valley to Siachen Glacier base.

    He said the bridge on Chamesahn Lungpa stream, which was completed in a limited working window, was possible due to meticulous planning, timely mobilization and innovative employment of resources.

    The spokesman said the increase in flow in Chamesahn Lungpa stream during summers and the movement of lar ..

    The spokesman said the increase in flow in Chamesahn Lungpa stream during summers and the movement of large volume of both tourist and military traffic over the existing temporary bailey bridge provided limited connectivity on Khalsar-Sasoma road.

    "The limitation has been overcome after BRO engineers and personnel built the bridge, which is the first among series of seven bridges to be constructed on Khalsar-Sasoma road. It has provided a major relief by improving traffic movement for local villagers and military personnel, besides tourists going to the scenic Panamik village," he said.

    The bridge was inaugurated by Lt Gen Harpal Singh, Director General Border Roads, and declared open for use by security forces and civilians of Leh-Ladakh region.

    General Singh, who is on a week-long visit to the Ladakh sector, addressed officers and subordinates of Project Himank and appreciated them for their grit and determination while maintaining these highest and most difficult roads.
     
  16. Prashant12

    Prashant12 Senior Member Senior Member

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    ISRO telemedicine nodes for soldiers in high-altitude areas


    In a major effort to improve emergency medical support to soldiers posted in high-altitude areas, especially Siachen, the Integrated Defence Staff of the Defence Ministry and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) signed a memorandum of understanding on Friday to set up telemedicine nodes in critical places across the country.

    “ISRO will establish 53 more nodes in the first phase over and above the existing 20, in various establishments of the Army, Navy and Air Force across the country,” a defence official said.

    In Siachen

    As part of this, in addition to a functioning node on the Siachen glacier, four more nodes are being established to enable medical consultation between soldiers deployed on the glacier and medical echelons in the rear.

    During winter months, many of the remote posts are cut off for several months because of adverse terrain and extreme weather, making emergency evacuation near impossible. Communication through satellite-enabled telemedicine nodes will be a paradigm shift in the delivery of lifesaving health care till the weather clears up and movement is possible.

    This joint initiative by ISRO and the Armed Forces Medical Services will transform the reach of telemedicine to soldiers, airmen and sailors in remote and isolated posts, the official added.

    https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/isro-telemedicine-nodes-for-soldiers-in-high-altitude-areas/article24774110.ece
     
  17. Prashant12

    Prashant12 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Isro to provide healing touch to Siachen soldiers


    NEW DELHI: In an effort to provide emergency medical treatment to security forces deployed in remote areas like Siachen Glacier, Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) has recently signed an agreement with the defence ministry for setting up telemedicine nodes.

    The space agency will establish 53 more nodes in the first phase to the existing 20 set up for the Army, Navy and Air Force across the country.

    Explaining the significance of these nodes, Isro chairman K Sivan told TOI, “In remote areas like Siachen Glacier, there is no permanent hospital or medical centres for security personnel. Through our satellite-based telemedicine programme, we can provide medical services to soldiers deployed in these far-flung areas. We set up small telemedicine hubs in these areas and link them to big hospitals in cities through our Gsat-series communication satellites. Specialist doctors in these hospitals interact with ailing or injured soldiers and prescribe them medicines. The prescribed medicines are then provided to ailing soldiers from the medicine stock stored in that place.”


    A memorandum of understanding (MoU) for telemedicine nodes was signed on Friday between development and education communication unit (DECU) of Isro, Ahmedabad, and Integrated Defence Staff (Medical), defence ministry, in Delhi.




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    The highest battleground in the world, Siachen remains cut off during winter due to extreme climatic conditions and difficult terrain. Soldiers have to brave freezing temperatures, which drop to minus 60 degrees Celsius. Besides the enemy, jawans have to face challenges like avalanches and landslides at such icy heights. The only mode of evacuation from these posts during medical emergency is by helicopters, and this also may not be feasible for days at times. In such a difficult condition, communication through the satellite-enabled telemedicine nodes is a boon for soldiers.

    Sivan said, “Isro is setting up these nodes not only for security forces deployed in remote areas, but also for rural people who can’t come to cities to avail of medical services during medical emergency. Specialist doctors from big hospitals like AIIMS, who can’t visit these areas on a short notice, provide medical services to the needy through our telemedicine programme.”

    Isro, which initiated the telemedicine programme in 2001, has now spread its telemedicine network to regions like Ladakh, Andaman & Nicobar Islands, Lakshadweep Islands, northeastern states and tribal districts of states like Kerala, Karnataka, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, West Bengal, Odisha, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Punjab and Rajasthan.

    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com...-to-siachen-soldiers/articleshow/65553992.cms
     
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  18. 12arya

    12arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    Col. Narendra ‘Bull’ Kumar, the Unsung Legend Who Secured Siachen For India
    Here’s the story of how mountaineering legend Col. Narendra ‘Bull’ Kumar almost single-handedly ensured India’s presence at Siachen in 1981.
    by Sanchari Pal February 24, 2018, 12:21 pm

    In the world of the Indian Armed Forces, he is known as ‘Bull’ Kumar. Colonel Narendra Kumar earned this unusual moniker when he charged at his six inch taller and tougher rival during his first boxing match at the National Defence Academy. His opponent and senior, Sunith Francis Rodrigues, went on to win the match and later become the Chief of Army Staff.

    Col. Kumar, on the other hand, lost the bout but the nickname stuck. And he has more than lived up to it. Like a bull in a rodeo, the short and stocky army man loves a challenges and goes at it with a relentless single-minded focus, irrespective of its ramifications.

    These qualities is perhaps why Col. Kumar almost single-handedly ensured India’s presence at Siachen in 1981, that too without spilling the blood of any soldier in the snowy realm.
    Here’s the untold story of how how he accomplished this extraordinary feat.

    [​IMG]
    Col. Narender ‘Bull’ Kumar
    Photo Source

    It all started with a German mountaineer and an American map. In the late 1970s, Col.Kumar was in charge of the High Altitude Warfare School in Gulmarg (which was also the mountain warfare school of the Indian Army).

    A German explorer — with whom Kumar had earlier traversed the upper reaches of the Indus river in Ladakh — showed him an American map of northern Kashmir that marked the Line of Control (LoC) much further to the east than he expected.

    Realising that the US appeared to have cartographically ceded a large chunk of eastern Karakoram (including the Siachen glacier) to Pakistan, a furious Col. Kumar bought the map and sent it straight to the Director General of Military Operations.

    Alarm bells ringing loudly in his head, he also volunteered to organise an expedition to the area to “correct the map”. Realising the need to cut through red tape and get to work, the recon mission was thus termed a ‘practical training session’ for students.

    Soon after, Col. Kumar headed into uncharted territory with a team of students from the High Altitude Warfare School. It was the first Indian expedition into the heart of Siachen — the largest alpine glacier on earth that has nearly two trillion cubic feet of ice.

    Beginning at the snout of the glacier, Col. Kumar and his team slowly but steadily made their way up the massive bulk of unforgiving ice. On the way, they had to navigate tricky crevasses and stay ahead of avalanches while braving temperatures that dipped to a numbing -50 degrees Celsius.
    [​IMG]
    Siachen (Representative Image)
    Photo Source

    What should be noted here is that these incredibly brave men did all this without any maps or hi-tech equipment. All they had was a rough idea of the ridges and peaks that had been named by the British decades ago.

    However, news of this expedition soon leaked across the border. By the time Col. Kumar’s unarmed team reached the icy source of Siachen, Pakistani fighter jets had started flying over them, firing coloured smoke!

    This and the trash that the team had found along the way — Pakistani cigarette packs, food cans and climbing gear — convinced him that the Pakistanis had been stealthily trying to entrench their claim on Siachen. Taking this trash and photos of the hovering jets as proof of Pakistani incursions, the team returned to base.

    Despite this recon report, it took Col. Kumar a while to convince his seniors about the seriousness of situation. It was not until early 1981 that he finally got the go-ahead to map the entire glacier, all the way from the snout to the Chinese border.

    And so Col. Kumar returned to Siachen, this time becoming the first Indian to climb the Sia Kangri —at 24,350 feet, this peak offers stunning views of the sprawling glacier. He came back with a detailed ‘sit-rep’ (situational report) that was immediately dispatched to Indian Army’s headquarters.
    [​IMG]
    Col. Kumar at the Sia Kangri peak at Siachen
    Photo Source

    The next year, he wrote about his exploration of Siachen in the popular magazine The Illustrated Weekly of India, in effect staking India’s claim. Realising that the Indian Army was now clearly involved, Pakistan ramped up its stealthy bid to secure Siachen for itself.

    It might have succeeded (in creating a formidable Pak-China corridor controlling the Karakoram Pass and threatening Ladakh) if the Indian intelligence had not learned of some interesting purchases made by Pakistani Army in London in 1984 — bulk orders of specialized mountain clothing.

    Recognizing the strategic threat, India immediately dispatched troops of Kumaon Regiment to the Siachen for control of the glacier and the neighbouring peaks in the Saltoro range. Under Operation Meghdoot, IAF choppers pushed themselves to their maximum capabilities to air-drop soldiers at Bilafond-La (that translates to “Pass of the Butterflies” in Balti language).

    And this is how India established a crucial military foothold in what would go on to become the world’s highest battlefield, beating Pakistan by a week. Their most important weapon? The detailed maps, photographs and videos made by Col. Kumar and his team.
    [​IMG]



    In the years that followed, a key army post on the glacier was named Kumar Base, making Col. Kumar perhaps the only living Indian army officer to enjoy this extremely rare honour.

    Incredibly, securing Siachen for India is just one (though extremely important) notch in Col. Kumar’s towering list of achievements.

    The soldier-mountaineer (who lost four of his toes to frostbite in 1961) is the first to scale Nandadevi (1964), the first to put India on Everest (1965) and first to climb Kanchenjunga from its toughest north-east face (1976) — a mountaineering feat described by The British Alpine Journal as ‘far more difficult than the Everest ascent’.

    [​IMG]

    Photo Source

    A life-long friend of Tenzing Norgay, Col. Kumar has also entered the oxygen-depleted death zone above 8,000 m more than twenty times. In fact, every time he did this, the feisty soldier had to sign a non-liability certificate (because of his disability) saying that he absolve the government of all responsibilities should anything happen to him!

    Unsurprisingly, this mountaineering legend is one of the most highly decorated officers in India. Narendra ‘Bull’ Kumar is the only colonel awarded the Param Vishisht Seva Medal (PVSM) distinction in all three services (normally accorded only to generals). He has also been honoured with the Padma Shri, the Kirti Chakra, the Ati Vishist Seva Medal, the Arjuna Award and the IMF Gold Medal by the Indian Mountaineering Foundation.

    Furthermore, Col. Kumar is a winner of the McGregor Medal, awarded by the United Service Institution of India for the best military reconnaissance, exploration or survey in remote areas in the country. With this, he joined the illlustrious ranks of Sir Francis Younghusband (who explored the northern crown of Central Asia and India) and Major General Wingate (who conducted guerrilla recon missions deep in Burma).

    Yet, few people in Indian know about Col. Kumar’s pioneering contributions to both mountaineering and national security. Its time we give him the respect and recognition he truly deserves.
     
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  19. Prashant12

    Prashant12 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Army recovers snow-stuck helicopter from Siachen Glacier, sets new record

    The chopper was stuck at 18,000 feet and recovering it from there is a world record of sorts because India is one of the very few countries in the world who operate helicopters at such high altitudes




    The Indian Army has created a world record of sorts as its pilots and technicians successfully recovered a helicopter which was stuck in snow at an altitude of 18,000 feet at Siachen Glacier in Jammu and Kashmir.

    The helicopter was brought back safely to the Siachen base camp with the help of infantry troops deployed there.

    According to sources in the Army, an ALH (Advanced Light Helicopter) Dhruv, on an air maintenance sortie at the 74-km-long Siachen Glacier, developed a snag and had to be landed around a post called Khanda in January this year.

    The pilots managed to land safely on soft snow but could not reach the helipad there, the sources said.

    Though the chopper landed safely, the overnight snow resulted in its falling sideways.

    Attempts were made to recover it but there was no success till July, they said.

    The attempts were successful in July when the technicians and pilots of the Army ALH squadron 203 in Leh managed to put new parts on the chopper and bring it back safely to the Siachen Glacier base camp.

    “I know the pilots and technicians who were involved in this operation. Knowing these people as I have headed this Army Aviation Corps for a couple of years, all I can say is that nothing is impossible for these men from Indian Army,” former Army Aviation chief Lt Gen P K Bharali (retd) told ANI on Tuesday.

    The chopper was stuck at 18,000 feet and recovering it from there is a world record of sorts because India is one of the very few countries in the world who operate choppers at such high altitudes.

    The Cheetah and Chetak choppers, which are French-origin machines in the Indian Army, fly at around 23,000 feet.

    The French military also doesn’t use them for such extreme operations where the margin of error is very thin.

    https://www.hindustantimes.com/indi...-new-record/story-uFkOgEeB8A5zV6UUCLe20O.html
     
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  20. Chinmoy

    Chinmoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    IMG_20181226_125523.jpg
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    IMG_20181226_125540.jpg
    Pics courtsey Col Ravi Prakash.
     

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