Russia to discuss - All the interesting things, achievements and fun

Discussion in 'Europe and Russia' started by gadeshi, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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    No, Bumerang is narrower and has completely different chassis and powerplant module.
    And of course it has different unmanned combat modules.
     
  2. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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  3. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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    Ros Prom Resource Company has mastered all-composite shipborn artillery turrets covers for A-190 (100mm) cannon mounts for Russian Navy corvettes and MRK (small missile ships):
    http://sdelanounas.ru/blogs/76820/
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  4. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    Next gen wound-healing bandage ready for market in Russia
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    21 Apr '16
    NAPOLI, a portfolio company of the RVC Seed Fund, has plans to bring to market later this year the next generation of its biodegradable wound bandage called “ChitoPran.” Like its first generation, the new bandage is made of the nanofibers of chitosan, a natural material found in the sea, but it also contains active medicinal substances.

    NAPOLI is said to have succeeded in adding to the bandage a special enzyme that is believed to be able to effectively clean wounds. The new technology may give surgeons a unique “bandage-scalpel” to treat necroses and prevent scarring; the new material is said to be soluble and replaceable by the natural tissue in the body as the wound heals.

    The bandage disappears and requires no removal after the wound healed, which helps protect a patient from unnecessary pain and the wound area from further irritation. The ChitoPran is believed to not only treat wounds but to also save doctors time for surgery and hospitals their overall costs.

    The high-tech bandage is said to positively impact all aspects of wound healing. It can reportedly step up regeneration processes, alleviate pain, and help prevent scarring.

    NAPOLI was set up in April 2014 by Ivan Afanasov, a Moscow Lomonosov State University alumnus majoring in chemistry. His team had a fairly advanced solution in its portfolio right out of the gate and soon raised $60,000 in investment from the RVC Seed Fund and Biotechpharm, a private company. It took the team less than three years to move its solution from a lab idea to a market-ready product.
     
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  5. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    Russo-American team makes cheap bendable solar panels
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    14 Apr '16
    Scientists at MISiS, one of Moscow’s top technology universities, in partnership with U.S. colleagues from the University of Texas at Dallas, have come up with a flexible solar panel that is said to be just 30% of the cost of silicon panels, portal Hi-tech.mailreported.

    While Si-based solar panels are rigid and fragile, and silicon and gallium arsenide required for production are costly and toxic, at the core of the new bendable solar panel technology are thin-film elements based on perovskite, a hybrid metal-organic compound.

    With the silicon solar panels, production costs about $300 per square meter. The new flexible technology makes it possible to produce a square meter for $100, with the competitive advantage growing exponentially with the manufacture of large quantities of the product. The new hybrid perovskite material is fairly easy to come by; it is obtainable from industrial chemical organic compounds and salts of some widespread metals.

    The MISiS technology enables a solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency of about 15% now. The developers hope to reach 20+% in a near future.

    According to Prof. Anvar Zakhidov, the project leader at MISiS, they put active layers of solar elements from liquid solutions on thin substrates. This means that the new solar panels can be placed everywhere, including roofs and building façade walls, casings of household electronics, etc., and even “energy curtains” can be made for homes and cars using the technology. The panel is applicable to a wide variety of materials, which also pushes overall costs down.
     
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  6. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    In Russia, new approach to wireless energy transmission developed
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    3 Feb '16
    Researchers working on metamaterials at the St. Petersburg University of IT, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO) in partnership with colleagues at Girikond, a local research institute, have shown that using ceramic dielectrics can lead to developing efficient wireless energy transmission systems, portal Science & Technologies RFreported.

    In a lab experiment, the developers are said to have been able to light up a LED bulb at a 20-30cm distance without any wires.

    “It’s but pioneering work; but the system does already work for a 20cm distance and 1W capacity,” ITMO research fellow Polina Kapitanova was quoted as saying.

    According to the scientist, her colleagues at Girikond have come up with new samples of ceramics with an augmented dielectric permittivity and reduced losses, which is expected to help increase distances for energy transmission and also shift to megahertz range operating frequencies that are not harmful to man.

    In 2007, a research team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology conducted a similar experiment and lit up a 60W bulb at a 2.5m distance by using two copper coils interacting with each other in resonance. At ITMO, the scientists replaced the coils with dielectric ceramic resonators which are said to enable the excitation of magnetic fields with reduced losses of energy
     
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  7. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    St. Pete’s tensometric solution boosts generator efficiency and brings about new gauges
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    22 Nov '15
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    St. Petersburg-based innovative company SmS Tenzotherm Rus has developed a brand new line of electricity metering devices and electrical power sources. A resident of the Skolkovo innovation hub outside Moscow, the company is making next gen resistance strain gauges and an array of other semiconductor sensing devices, as well as thermoelectric generators, based on samarium sulfide (SmS), a rare-earth semiconductor with distinctive properties. Using SmS is expected to triple the efficiency of conventional thermoelectric generators, and with a much wider range of output resistance and operating temperatures compared to the current competition the strain gauges will be in demand in sectors as diverse as solar and nuclear energy, aerospace, construction, and mechanical engineering.

    Samarium sulfide (SmS) has been known as a semiconductor since the 1960s, but for a long time the substance was off the radar of this country’s research think-tanks. Just a few years ago a research team of the A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute in St. Petersburg—the only Russian scientific institution working in this field at that time—discovered the unique properties of the material, including that of effectively converting heat into electricity.

    Now a St. Petersburg innovative business, SmS Tenzotherm Rus, wants to put the discovery to economic use by developing a new base material for semiconductor sensors and thermoelectric generators flawless enough to match the current level of global engineering and compete internationally.

    Tensometric products

    SmS Tenzotherm Rus is working on a range of advanced samarium sulfide based tensometric products, including resistance strain gauges, pressure resistance gauges, pressure meters, force transducers, displacement pickups and other devices that the developers say will “show no deficiencies while maximizing the advantages that conventional semiconductor sensors have.”

    The firm’s flagship product is the resistance strain gauge, a resistor whose resistance is variable and depends on a degree of its strain. The device helps measure the deformation of elements that are mechanically tied with it.

    Next gen thermoelectric generators

    The St. Petersburg company also hopes to make the most of the exceptional properties of the rare-earth substance to develop an innovative line of electrical power sources, primarily thermoelectric generators, with twofold or even threefold efficiency compared to today’s generators.

    Thermoelectric materials used in the thermoelectric generator enable direct conversion of heat energy into electricity.

    SmS Tenzotherm Rus earlier claimed that using samarium sulfide tensometric technology had already brought about a 40-50% boost in generator efficiency.

    Researchers and economists are said to believe that with thermoelectric generator efficiency reaching 15%—a substantial increase from today’s less than 10%—this new line of SmS-based generators will compete with a lot of current energy sources, potentially swelling the global thermoelectric module market to a few billion dollar value.

    SmS Tenzotherm Rus' resistance strain gauges, too, is a development to keep tabs on. With a much wider range of output resistance and operating temperatures compared to the current competition the gauges are likely to be in strong demand in sectors as diverse as solar and nuclear energy, aerospace, construction, and mechanical engineering.
     
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  8. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    Russia pushes its STT-MRAM next gen memory program
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    17 Mar '16
    Crocus NanoElectronics, a portfolio company of Russia’s nanotech giant, Rusnano, and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), a leading Russian technology university, have launched a joint research program in an effort to develop a next gen STT-MRAM magnetic memory and test production technology for that, Rusnano announced.

    The partners expect to jointly develop new materials, design devices, and come up with new modeling and control methods. If they pull it off, the groundwork will be laid for the production of STT-MRAM-based items on the premises of Crocus NanoElectronics.

    The Spin-Transfer Torque Magnetic Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM) technology is built around the idea of transferring spins for re-saving memory cells. Using this effect in making conventional magneto-resistive memory helps reduce electrical current required for storing data in a cell, and enables production to 90-to-22 nanometer design rule and lower.

    The international majors manufacturing DRAM dynamic memory all push their own STT-MRAM development programs, as they believe the technology is most likely to replace DRAM in a near future.

    Crocus NanoElectronics is Europe’s only company, and one of the world’s few, to provide a commercial hub to manufacture magnetic tunnel structure based memory and sensors to 90/65 nanometer design rule on wafers 300mm in diameter.
     
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  9. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    Cutting-edge Russian solutions for mobile medicine
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    20 Apr '16
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    Today we’ll take a brief look at two interesting biomed projects. These are IT-enabled, and their developers in St. Petersburg and Siberia’s Omsk tap into cloud computing and other software solutions to help patients monitor their health status and interact with their physicians via mobile technologies for rapid real-time analysis of the key data.

    A multiformat network from Siberia

    The project pushed by a team of Omsk-based IT developers in Siberia calls for the development of a multiformat network for biomed data exchange. According to the developers, their approach utilizes cloud computing for automatic data analysis and computer-aided diagnosis on a real-time basis. A server installed in a local diagnostics center would serve as the base hardware component of the system.

    The software and hardware complex also enables medical specialists to hold video conferences and consultations. Another purported advantage is helping physicians conduct remote IT-enabled doctor’s rounds and even serve patients on a remote basis. Adding navigation capabilities is reportedly possible to track mobile patients’ whereabouts.

    The key beneficiaries would be both resident patients and outpatients living in far-flung localities and therefore unable to visit diagnostics centers.

    The Omsk network primarily features portable health status monitors capable of detecting life-threatening conditions, especially those in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and immediately alerting doctors to the dangers by transmitting data via a wireless channel. Other hardware components include communicators based on patients’ smartphones or dedicated tablet PCs at nursing aid posts; broadband communications terminals; and a cloud computing center for diagnosing cases and generating recommendations.

    Mobile medicine from St. Petersburg

    As the Omsk team unveils its multiformat checkup and analysis network, another group of IT enthusiasts from St. Petersburg State University with a strong background in mathematics and mechanics is coming up with their own version of a similar solution for mobile medicine.

    The St. Petersburg developers are absolutely confident that mobile medicine has the potential to drive the entire biomed sector and raise ample investment, and have put together an international Russo-Swiss effort aimed at creating component software for remote mobile-based monitoring of a patient’s organism.

    They say that the key partners in their endeavor are manufacturers of medical devices and developers of medical information systems and social networks. They view systems integrators as the primary market for their end product.

    Their product incorporates a multiplatform mobile software solution for wireless transmission of data from medical devices and data storage in a dedicated cloud. The St. Pete team is reportedly using a whole array of data transfer technologies, including Bluetooth, BLE, NFC and ANT+. To manage the cloud, special server software has been developed. The system also includes an application platform interface (API) for integration with third-party information systems, and a demo web-based portal.

    The St. Pete-originating software is believed to support a range of sensors including monitors and meters for ECG, oxygen saturation, weight and fetal monitoring, blood pressure or blood glucose, with the possibility to easily add others. Based on the technology, a set of branded and highly customized solutions for real-time health monitoring data processing can be developed, the developers said.
     
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  10. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kazan microwaves for new nonmetals production—safer and cost-effective
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    2 Apr '15
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    Oleg Kouzbit, Online News Managing Editor

    Scientists from Kazan National Research Technological University, Tatarstan, have offered the nonmetallic minerals sector a new production technique. Microwaves are coming to replace electrical current and ignition used now in conventional toxic-hazardous methods. The researchers claim that the technology saves production costs, leaves little waste in the process compared to traditional blasting, and helps produce higher-quality material. It could also be very helpful for other purposes, such as housebreaking, slum clearance, or rock fragmentation on construction sites.

    In a bid to improve the blasting method of producing nonmetallic minerals, Russian companies’ favorite for decades, the Tatarstan researchers have developed an innovative explosive detonation technique that uses radio-wave emission rather than conventional ignition or electrical current.

    The developer

    Kazan National Research Technological University (KNRTU) is one of the oldest higher educational institutions in the Mid-Volga area. Set up in 1890 as Kazan Industrial College, KNRTU has evolved into a university that ranks tenth out of Russia’s 159 technology universities. It runs 99 academic departments.

    The university is a player in the innovation field in Tatarstan and Russia as a whole, collaborating with universities and businesses from more than 20 countries.

    How the innovation works

    With the new approach, a whole new set of opportunities may open up in production of basalt, granite, sand, clay and other well-known minerals widely used in construction for centuries. Ironically, current techniques to produce these materials, readily available in many areas across the planet, are still far from cost-effective.

    In the KNRTU technology, special holes are bored in rock mass where ammonium nitrate is placed in a special explosive mixture. The holes are then thoroughly tamped with sand and polymers. When exposed to targeted microwave radiation, the explosive mixture blazes up, causing a sharp increase in pressure and subsequent cleavage of rock.

    Emission power can be carefully controlled and an amount of explosives chosen to make sure the blast effectively splits the rock mass while keeping down dust formation and fragmented waste.

    Alternatives: pros and cons

    The technique is believed to bring about results similar in rock fragmentation power to what is known as air cushion, a traditional method that calls for the pumping of air inside rock strata through specially drilled holes, with rock mass then destroyed by overpressure. However, air cushion is much costlier, experts say.

    Another alternative way of producing nonmetals is conventional blasting with electrical current or ignition—the one that the Tatarstan innovation may come to replace. It is considered the cheapest as of today, and most widespread.

    With this economical and widely used method, why bother with any improvement?

    There’s a good reason for that, the Kazan researchers think. In an explosion, about 30% of rock turns into useless dust and the remaining 70% is shattered into cracked fragments of various size. It is a low-quality product that requires further on-the-spot processing, with a lot of unrecoverable waste to be simply thrown away. Most explosives used in standard blasting are toxic and hazardous to personnel.

    Testing and proving

    To see if their invention is really a cut above that old routine approach KNRTU put it to the test. Ammonium nitrate and diesel fuel—a mixture that is not explosive unless hit by radio-wave emission—were placed into holes made in 600x600x600mm concrete blocks. After tamping, the blocks were exposed to 1,200W microwaves at a frequency of 2.45GHz. Two minutes later the researchers saw several large monolithic pieces with few or no cracks.

    With an increase in emission power cleavage time shortened and resultant fragments got smaller.

    Following the experiment, the researchers claimed that the technology was relatively inexpensive, leaving little waste in the process compared to traditional blasting and helping produce higher-quality material. It could also be very helpful for other purposes, such as housebreaking, slum clearance, or rock fragmentation on construction sites.
     
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  11. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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  12. charlie

    charlie Senior Member Senior Member

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    nice documentary ...................
     
  13. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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    Chechen Republic special forces members have completed its first Arctic expedition:

     
  14. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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  15. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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  16. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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  17. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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  18. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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  19. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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  20. gadeshi

    gadeshi Senior Member Senior Member

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    Russian combat exoskeleton:
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