Pakistani Military Developments/feb-june 09

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by A.V., Feb 18, 2009.

  1. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Pakistan’s Self-Defeating Army

    Pakistan’s Self-Defeating Army

    Rajesh M. Basrur and Sumit Ganguly
    NEWSWEEK
    From the magazine issue dated May 4, 2009

    Rather than serve as a bulwark against chaos, the Army has helped destabilize Pakistan. For far too long, the myth that Pakistan's army is the only thing holding the country together—and keeping the terrorists at bay—has held sway in Washington. Now two bills making their way through Congress suggest the United States is finally starting to reconsider these assumptions. Both bills would set benchmarks that Pakistan has to meet in order to keep qualifying for U.S. economic and military assistance. But the two measures don't go far enough. Pakistan will never be saved from the threat of religious extremists until it fundamentally restructures its deeply dysfunctional government. And that will require addressing the overwhelming influence of the military on Pakistani politics.

    In four critical ways, the Army has undermined constitutional governance in Pakistan ever since Mohammed Ali Jinnah led it to independence some 60 years ago. First, repeated coups have ensured that civilian governments never developed firm roots. Second, successive military rulers, in attempts to boost their legitimacy, have promoted religious radicalism, either directly (as in the case of Zia ul Haq, who did this over the span of a decade) or by marginalizing mainstream political parties and allowing the religious right to fill the vacuum (Pervez Musharraf's strategy before his ouster last year). Third, the Army became and remains a parasite feeding on the body politic by extracting "rent" in the form of land, bureaucratic appointments and other spoils of office in exchange for supposedly keeping Pakistan safe.

    Finally, in a misbegotten quest for "strategic depth" against India, the Army has promoted the radicalization of Afghanistan, which has now spilled back onto its own territory and spun out of control. All of these missteps point to the same conclusion: rather than serve as a bulwark against chaos, the Army has helped to destabilize Pakistan. There's only one way to turn things around today: demilitarize Pakistani politics.

    Doing so won't be easy. While there is significant popular support for democracy in Pakistan, the country's mainstream civilian parties have hardly distinguished themselves in their brief periods at the helm, and the current government of Asif Ali Zardari is no exception. Still, the military bears most of the blame for blocking the evolution of a true democratic process. And such a process—for all its inevitable flaws and inefficiencies—is the only way Pakistan will ever get a government truly responsive to the needs of its ordinary citizens, and one likely to crack down on the Taliban, which most Pakistanis disdain.

    So how can Pakistan's government be "civilianized"? Useful lessons can be drawn from the democratization of other Praetorian states. The first thing to recognize is that depoliticizing the Army won't mean weakening it. Pakistan's senior officers must know that they have never been less popular than they are today; returning to their barracks for good would be the best way to revive their prestige.

    This process has in fact already begun. It was started by the Army itself in early 2008, when the new chief of staff General Ashfaq Kayani forbade officers from holding civilian posts in government. But much more needs to be done. Parliament and the prime minister must steadily assert themselves to limit the Army's involvement in internal affairs. The military will resist. But the recent victory of the lawyers' movement—which forced the government to restore the Supreme Court's former chief justice, who'd been deposed by Musharraf—shows that civilians can take on the generals and win. Over time, the civilian government must shift national-intelligence functions from the military to a civilian organization, curb the reach of the infamous Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) and strip the military of its responsibilities for maintaining security inside Pakistan, giving that duty to a paramilitary force governed by the ministry of Interior (as in neighboring India). Such a step was critical to the transitions from military to civilian government in Chile in 1990 and Indonesia in 1998.

    Pakistan's nuclear infrastructure, meanwhile, should be split into military and civilian components, both under civilian authority. And most important, civilians must begin making critical national-security policy decisions. Implementation should still fall to the military, which should also retain a voice in defense policy—but not the final one.

    While some of the generals are likely to object to any reduction in their powers, it's in their own interests to accept a fundamental change. Letting the Army maintain a degree of autonomy regarding its internal functions should also help bring it around. And Washington can contribute by demanding reforms of the sort outlined above. Contrary to popular belief, the U.S. has a great deal of leverage over Pakistan thanks to the enormous amounts of aid Washington disburses (likely to total $7.5 billion over the next five years). Making these changes may still seem like a tall order. It is. But Pakistan's problems at this point are massive in scope—and so must be the solution.

    Basrur is associate professor at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Ganguly is a professor of political science and is director of research at the Center on American and Global Security at Indiana University.

    To Save Pakistan Get the Army Out of Politics | Newsweek International Edition | Newsweek.com
     
  2. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Daredevil please have a look in to the existing thread before opening new ones.
     
  3. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  4. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    This is an important article I thought I'd share with you. It reveals some intricate details about the workings of the Pakistani army- particularly with respect to its operations in the frontier- written by a Pakistani journalist named Kamran Shafi who has access to some unimpeachable grassroots sources:


    Bad news and worse

    By Kamran Shafi
    Tuesday, 28 Apr, 2009 | 02:03 AM PST

    [​IMG]


    IN a brave statement, the COAS has said that the army ‘has the resolve to fight and eliminate militancy from the country.’ And that what all of us understood to be the helplessness of the fifth largest army in the world facing a vastly outnumbered and ill-equipped bunch of thugs was actually an ‘operational pause’.


    One should have liked to believe the COAS of an army that has forever boasted that but for it Pakistan should have long hence disappeared from the face of the earth, and which has therefore expropriated the lion’s share of our poor country’s treasury. He will forgive us if we don’t click our heels and do a merry jig, for the record of the Pakistan Army is bad. Read on.


    But first to the ISPR’s clarification (Dawn, April 21) which tried to debunk my article ‘The march of the Taliban’ (April 14) in which I had said that the Swat Taliban, riding in 10 double-cabins and bristling with arms, had been observed driving from Daggar in Buner to Swat via Swabi, the Motorway and Mardan. The ISPR states that this is not true.


    Quite apart from the fact that I have gone back to my impeccable sources who assure me the Taliban marched in exactly the fashion I had described, could the ISPR kindly tell us why anyone should believe it, considering its track record? Could it also please clarify its locus standi in the matter? Why did the Frontier government not make the clarification?



    Or is it at all possible that the army is at long last beginning to realise that if the Taliban are showing naked and brutal force all over the Frontier, and thence surely will show it in the rest of Pakistan, it has much to answer for, for not effectively fighting them in Swat?


    We can only live in hope, for very soon after my piece was published, there were reports that the Taliban — ragtag, wearing broken chappals but also web equipment (freely available in Hayatabad’s Amreekan market where pilfered Nato and US army equipment is sold) — were within striking distance of Tarbela dam and also of Islamabad the Beautiful. Intriguingly, the Taliban’s foremost supporter, Maulana Fazlur Rehman, a most important pillar of Asif Zardari’s federal government made this claim.


    But what gives in Swat? The reports are not encouraging, to say the very least. Mullah Radio goes on preaching violence and hate from his FM radio station which has still not been taken out despite the DG ISPR himself assuring us many weeks ago, before the army put its hands up in Swat, that the ‘equipment’ to find the source of FM broadcasts had finally been acquired by the army. Well, where is it then?


    There is far worse news. An army convoy has been blocked by the Taliban just outside Mingora and sent back! Is this the way that an army that pretends to be well-trained and equipped and which says it is capable of taking on all comers behaves when confronted by a gang of criminals?


    And worse still. There is talk of a general amnesty for the Swat renegades, no matter what their crimes against humanity. Crimes such as decapitation; robbing graves and shooting up corpses and hanging them after decapitating the dead bodies; slaughtering women school teachers and 70-year old ex-servicemen. Amnesty for these Yahoos, sirs?



    What is wrong with everyone? Must the Pakistani state debase itself in this manner? Must it prove again and again that it is mendacious enough to let its own monsters do what they will to whomever they will, and that it will then help them get away with it? Must the Pakistani nation, whose misfortune it is to live under this cruel and mindless state, be dishonoured to the extent that whilst murderers and executioners and thieves and robbers, many of them foreigners, are given ‘amnesty’, thousands of its poor brothers and sisters languish in its awful jails awaiting trial for petty offences such as gambling Rs.10 in a game of cards, and other such ludicrous misdemeanours?


    Who came up with this particular jewel of an amnesty for the Swat criminals please? They not only brought mayhem and death to that valley, but also took up arms against the state. Surely treason of the first order, what? And yet an amnesty is being considered for them? If you must give the Yahoos amnesty, then please open the gates of all the jails in Pakistan and release those who are lesser criminals.


    In the meantime, back at the ranch, instead of constantly monitoring the deteriorating situation in Swat and Buner and, (breaking news) in Battagram of Mansehra district where NGOs have stopped work after being threatened, the ‘agencies’ have made a menacing call or two to some ‘unfriendly’ media people. In addition, the ISPR, when rebutting or complaining about the media actually copies its communications to the directorate general of the ISI! What does the ISI have to do with the media?


    So then, bad news all around. To the extent that even in these fraught times, the army high command is fixated on acquiring more and more land. A recent article in The News by the good Asim Sajjad Akhtar who has done excellent work on the way the army treats its tenants on the farms it leases (not owns, please note) from the Punjab government — leases which have run out in many cases — tells us that as recently as the end of 2008 GHQ was exchanging letters with the Punjab Board of Revenue asking for another 100,000 acres!Which reminds me: considering the need of the army high command for more and more land, why not allot 500 acres of Frontier/central government land in every town in Swat where its senior officers can build holiday homes and cottages?


    PS. In 1897 in what was then British India, the Malakand Field Force numbering approximately 6,200 all ranks, but led from the front by Sir Bindon Blood, defeated 15,000 tribesmen armed in same fashion, except for two Maxim machine guns and a battery of mountain artillery. No helicopter gunships, no tanks, no armoured cars.


    [email protected]



    DAWN.COM | Columnists | Bad news and worse
     
  5. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Five policemen kidnapped, 11 suspects arrested in Swat

    Updated at: 2210 PST, Tuesday, April 28, 2009

    [​IMG]


    SWAT: Five policemen have been kidnapped while security forces arrested 11 suspects here on Tuesday.

    According to sources, militants attacked a police checkpost located in the outskirts of Mingora and kidnapped three policemen.

    Earlier, unidentified gunmen fired on a police party in Bahrain area injuring one while another policeman was abducted. Security forces arrested 11 suspected militants from Fizzaghat checkpost and shifted them to an undisclosed location.


    Five policemen kidnapped, 11 suspects arrested in Swat
     
  6. Flint

    Flint Senior Member Senior Member

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    PA's New Offensive

    Heavy Fighting Enters Third Day in Pakistan


    By CARLOTTA GALL and SALMAN MASOOD
    Published: April 30, 2009

    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Heavy fighting raged for a third day in Pakistan’s northwest province as civilians flooded from the area and the Pakistani military reported some gains in pushing back Taliban insurgents.

    The Pakistani military secured mountain passes to the west and south of the district, Buner, 60 miles from the capital, according to its spokesman, Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas, who spoke at a news briefing at the military headquarters in Rawalpindi. Helicopter gunships also rocketed Taliban positions in the north of Buner, where the militants had apparently fortified positions in areas adjoining their stronghold in the Swat Valley.

    While government forces consolidated control of Buner’s main town, Daggar, General Abbas said it could still take another week for the operation to clear the whole district of militants, as the military was proceeding slowly to defuse booby traps and avoid civilian casualties.

    The militants continued to unleash attacks, hitting a checkpost belonging to government paramilitary forces from the Frontier Corps in northern Buner, and seizing several police stations across the region, including two in the upper reaches of Swat.

    Suicide car bombers also tried to hit government troops in the south of Buner but were destroyed before they could reach their targets, General Abbas said. Some 50 members of the police and paramilitary forces were still being held hostage by the Taliban in Buner.

    Still, the government and the military repeated their support for the peace agreement forged in February with militants, under which the government agreed to install Shariah Islamic courts throughout seven districts in the Malakand region, including Swat and Buner.

    “The army has faced extreme criticism in the last two to three months, but we think that the peace agreement is a good agreement,” General Abbas said. “If peace can be brought in the region without further destruction, then it will be a victory for all. But the other side is violating from Day 1. We have kept informing the government of the violations.”

    Maulana Sufi Muhammad, who helped negotiate the accord for the militants, said the government had violated the peace agreement and warned that continuing the military operations would further inflame the militants and increase the spread of the Taliban.

    “The government has violated the peace deal by starting military operations and sending troops to the area,” he told a meeting of elders in the district of Dir, where the Taliban have also been active. He called on the government to re-establish peace and said that if that failed, he would make the same demands for Shariah law from a future government.

    Compounding Pakistan’s problems, ethnic gang warfare raged in the southern port city of Karachi, leaving more than 30 people dead in two days of street violence. Meanwhile, officials warned of a tense situation in the southwest, in Baluchistan Province, where the government has failed to calm public anger over the killing of three nationalist leaders.

    In Karachi, paramilitary rangers were deployed to stem the street violence. Some 34 people have been killed and 42 people injured in the violence, which began when a group of gunmen opened fire on an outlying settlement in the north of the city, local news agencies reported. About 20 vehicles were torched, local reporters said.

    Karachi, a sprawling city of some 14 million, and a melting pot of Pakistan’s ethnic groups, has for decades been racked by ethnic, gang and drug-related violence. Concerns have grown recently that radical Islamists and Taliban sympathizers have established an increasingly aggressive presence in outlying Pashtun neighborhoods and frequently clashed with supporters of the MQM, a secular, immigrant-based party that dominates many of the central urban neighborhoods.

    Carlotta Gall reported from Islamabad, and Salman Masood from Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
     
  7. Flint

    Flint Senior Member Senior Member

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  8. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Well, PA is incapable of fighting Talibans or insurgents in one on one basis but rather are only capable of using gunships and heavy artillery indiscriminately and kill more civilians and destroy their property than the Talibans. This in turn creates more internally displaced persons and perfect recruitment ground for the Talibans. A good example for this kind of offensive is Loe Sam, where PA has destroyed the entire town and lead to massive numbers of internally displaced persons and never resettled them in the same or other place and creating a lot of resentment among the people.
     
  9. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    I totally agree with you Dare Devil , the use of Heavy Weapons including Heavy Artillery as well as Helicopter Gunship will solve nothing but destruction of homes and creating Humanitarian problem, forcing thousands fleeing their homes.

    The link of a report from Hindu:

    http://www.hindu.com/2009/05/01/stories/2009050155360900.htm

    Regards
     
  10. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    Here is an analysis from Najmuddin A Shaikh former Foreign Secretary of Pakistan in Daily Times, Pakistan

    The link and the analysis from Daily Times follows:

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009\05\01\story_1-5-2009_pg3_2


    ANALYSIS: Taking back Buner and Dir —Najmuddin A Shaikh

    The army, hopefully, will not stop its operation until it has disarmed the Taliban. But to be able to continue this operation, the army and the government will need public support and for that the media has to play a far more constructive role than it has been inclined to play so far

    By the time this column appears, the Buner operation will have been on for 72 hours. The ISPR spokesperson, during his press conference, played taped conversations between warlord Fazlullah and his commanders in Buner, where Fazlullah is asking them to stage a fake withdrawal and lie low with their arms.

    This clearly indicated that the Taliban had no intention of withdrawing from the area. The Taliban incursion had also brought Uzbek and other foreign militants into Buner; some reports, perhaps exaggerated, suggested that militants from southern Punjab too were present in there.

    The Lower Dir operation will also continue since reports from the area suggest that few of the 35,000 or more people who fled the fighting have been able to return and the sound of gunfire still reverberates in the area. The Taliban are said to be in control of the eastern part of the district that links up with Swat and they are also said to be running a training camp in one of the many mountain valleys that make up Lower Dir.

    In Swat, unconfirmed reports suggest that the Taliban have kidnapped five members of the Tablighi Jama’at, and have also taken four policemen hostage in other parts of Swat.

    It seems that the provincial government’s efforts to locate Sufi Muhammad and to resume negotiations regarding the appointment of judges for the Darul Qaza have remained fruitless. The Sufi been incommunicado since Saturday, casting doubts on the efficacy of the role that he and his TNSM were to play in ensuring peace in Swat after implementation of the Nizam-e Adl. Army action in Swat in the near future appears inevitable or at least should be, given the clear indications that have now been received from Maulvi Sufi Mohammad and his deputies that they want far more than the Nizam-e Adl.

    Lala Afzal Khan, the ANP politician from Swat, is right in claiming that this deal will collapse and that the only answer is military action against the Taliban.

    Meanwhile in Karachi, widespread violence erupted after a series of smaller incidents, with many localities affected and more than 25 persons killed. Initial reports suggest that the show of force arranged by the Rangers and the police in the affected areas did not have the intended effect. A minister has claimed that the prime minister has issued shoot to kill orders to law enforcement authorities in Karachi and that there are hopes that the situation will improve soon. That is optimistic.

    There is little doubt that the violence in Karachi is linked to the situation in the north. There is also little doubt that in the days to come, the Taliban and their cohorts, in a bid to reduce the pressure in the north, will increase the number of suicide attacks and the general incitement of violence and intimidation throughout Pakistan.

    Civil society has become more aware of the “existential” threat that the Taliban pose to Pakistan. Recent demonstrations in Lahore and planned demonstrations in Karachi and other major cities bear testimony to this. But as one Swati said to me bitterly some months ago, there was an even greater awareness in Swat when Talibanisation started. The people were prepared to resist the Taliban with force of arms but as Taliban power grew and as the authorities remained indifferent, the will to resist drained away. Political leaders, with the notable exception of Afzal Lala, fled the area; policemen resigned or refused to, in the absence of support, tackle the well armed and well protected men of Fazlullah.

    Two questions now arise. Will the military operation be sustained and taken to its logical conclusion — the disarming of the Taliban and a dialogue thereafter? And will the people remain steadfast at a time when the economic crisis has added to the ranks of the unemployed and when dissatisfaction with the government is high?

    President Zardari has issued a statement calling upon “the entire nation to give pause to their political differences...rise to the occasion and give full support to our security forces in this critical hour.” This is a plea that will find strong backing when he meets with Presidents Obama and Karzai in Washington on May 5. It will be to the Americans and our other allies that we will have to look for the economic support that can mitigate in some measure economic difficulties and for the equipment the military will need to pursue its current campaign. That assistance, particularly economic, is sorely needed. We need to create more employment opportunities especially in FATA.

    This raises a further question. Can the current wave of anti-Americanism be brought under control or will the media continue to flog the view that America is using the war on terror as a pretext for engineering the disintegration of Pakistan and getting hold of our nuclear assets?

    In recent days, the tone of the commentators has changed somewhat but it is far from certain that they have absorbed fully the danger that Talibanisation poses, or that this Talibanisation is independent of developments in Afghanistan, or that not only the USA and its western allies but also such close friends of Pakistan like China and Saudi Arabia have expressed concern about the perceived inability of the government to counter the Taliban.

    The flogging video created a reaction that even the most sympathetic of commentators could not condone initially, but since then many have termed the video a forgery or a conspiracy to derail the Swat deal. In our current state of denial, perhaps this explanation will be accepted.

    What we need to bring to the attention of the people is the exact nature of the system that the Taliban want to bring not only to Malakand Division but to all of Pakistan and then of course to the rest of South Asia. Yesterday I had the horrific experience of watching a video online that has apparently been circulated by the Taliban to show how they deal with alleged spies. Suffice it to say that it depicts the sort of cruelty that is totally unacceptable even in the most violence prone society.

    Perhaps this video is a forgery though it has an air of authenticity about it. Perhaps it depicts acts of common criminals who have found the Taliban label a convenient cover for their activities. But those of our commentators who do not have conveniently short memories should recall for the benefit of their viewers that Taliban rule in Afghanistan meant the flogging of any woman in Herat and Kabul who dared venture out of her home without a “mehram” male escort and the caning of the Pakistani football team when its members appeared on the Kandahar football field wearing shorts.

    Perhaps they should be highlighting more the introduction of the same system in Taliban-controlled Swat along with the signs that have appeared all over Swat: barber shops banning the shaving of beards and the banning of women’s presence in female tailoring shops.

    The point is that Buner and Lower Dir do indicate that the penny has dropped for all power centres in Pakistan and they are determined to fight this menace with all the means at their disposal. The army, hopefully, will not stop its operation until it has disarmed the Taliban. But to be able to continue this operation, the army and the government will need public support and for that the media has to play a far more constructive role than it has been inclined to play so far.

    A long and difficult struggle lies ahead. It remains to be seen if we, the people of Pakistan, have the resolve to sustain this fight; and most importantly, if the media will help sustain it.

    The writer is a former foreign secretary
     
  11. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    The PA has just now started to fight a Counter Insurgency war. So I thnk they need a few advice from people who have already fought a counter insurgency war. The mid and low level Pakistani army officers must be willing to fight the Taliban. The Taliban has a lot of contacts within the army which is going to be a huge hindrance. The ISI is also flooded with the Pashtuns who are also pro-Taliban. we must first see how the offensive is going to turnout. There is going to be humanitarian crisis. The Pakistani Army must pull its act together and fight whole-heartedly and not dilly dally with their objectives. No breather must be given to Taliban which is more effective in reorganizing itself.
     
  12. Flint

    Flint Senior Member Senior Member

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    Militants offering stiff resistance: Pakistan

    Nirupama Subramanian

    Karachi riots a conspiracy to divert attention, says MQM


    ISLAMABAD: The Pakistan Army is still battling to establish control over Buner in the North-West Frontier Province where the Taliban militants have taken an entire village hostage, said the military spokesman on Thursday.


    Security forces have taken control of Daggar, the district headquarters, but the militants were offering stiff resistance in other places in the district, said Major-General Athar Abbas, head of the Inter-Services Public Relations, at a press conference.

    The Taliban is also holding “hostage”, he said, the entire population of a village in Buner called Sultanwas.


    Security forces are said to have taken control of some heights in the district and are using helicopter gunships and artillery to target hide-outs in Buner. He said the militants “were seen counting their dead”, but did not put a number to the Taliban casualties.

    The security forces have established control in lower Dir. According to Major-General Abbas, “the people are taking a sigh of relief that the militants have been cleared from the area”. Curfew has been relaxed in the area for a few hours in the daytime.

    Thousands of people fled the Dir area just prior to the operation and have continued to leave both Dir and Buner over the last two days.

    Of 50 paramilitaries and police abducted by the militants, Major-General Abbas confirmed only that 18 had been recovered.

    It is not clear how or where these security personnel were found. He did not answer a question on what efforts the military was making to recover the remaining hostages.
    Black Thunder

    Security forces began an operation codenamed Black Thunder in these areas on Tuesday, and the military spokesman expressed the optimism that they would end by the end of this week.

    The Pakistani forces have drawn up a list of more equipment to tackle the militants effectively. Included are high-speed attack helicopters, communication and night vision equipment and surveillance devices.

    In Swat, he said, it was the effort of the government and the security forces not to take any step that would endanger an accord between the government and the militants, but also noted that the Taliban was in “gross violation” of the controversial agreement.

    “The government and the security forces are acting with utmost restraint and patience because if peace can be achieved without further bloodshed or destruction, that is best,” he said

    “But the militants are not honouring whatever they have agreed for. Terrorism, terrorising the people of the area is continuing unabated, and we consider this a gross violation of the peace deal,” he said.

    The provincial government, meanwhile, appealed to Sufi Mohammed, the cleric with which it controversially agreed to set up sharia courts in Swat and six other districts making up Malakand division in order to buy peace with the Taliban, to make contact with government representatives.

    The ANP-led provincial government and the cleric are at loggerheads over the appointment of judges to the sharia courts. The government’s nominees are not acceptable to Sufi Mohammed, and vice versa.

    Unrest also gripped Karachi, Pakistan’s commercial hub, with more than 30 people killed in ethnic rioting over Tuesday and Wednesday between the city’s Urdu-speaking majority and the Pashtun groups.

    Muttahida Qaumi Movement leader Farooq Sattar said the riots were a conspiracy to divert attention from the Taliban’s activities, which posed the biggest threat to Pakistan.

    The MQM is Karachi’s dominant political party and represents Urdu speakers. It has long warned that Karachi is in imminent danger of being “talibanised”.
     
  13. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    This is indeed our war

     
  14. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  15. Flint

    Flint Senior Member Senior Member

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    Pak must destroy Taliban in two weeks time: Petraeus



    Washington, May One (PTI) Virtually putting Pakistan on notice, the US has said it is looking for concrete action by the government there to destroy the Taliban operating out of its territory in the next two weeks before determining its next course of action.
    Gen. David Petraeus, Commander of U.S. Central Command, has told U.S. Officials the next two weeks are critical to determining whether the Pakistani government will survive, Fox News reported.

    Petraeus made this assessment in talks with lawmakers and Obama administration officials this week, individuals familiar with the discussions told the TV channel.

    "The Pakistanis have run out of excuses" and are "finally getting serious" about combating the threat from Taliban and Al Qaeda extremists operating out of Northwest Pakistan, the general is reported to have told the officials.

    The TV network reported that Petraeus also said wearily that "we've heard it all before" from the Pakistanis and he is looking to see concrete action by the government to destroy the Taliban in the next two weeks before determining the United States' next course of action.

    The Obama Administration is currently focussed on propping up the Pakistani government and military with counter-insurgency training and foreign aid.

    The network said Petraeus and senior administration officials believe the Pakistani army, led by Chief of Staff Gen. Ashfaq Kayani, is "superior" to the civilian government, led by President Ali Zardari, and could conceivably survive even if Zardari's government falls to the Taliban. PTI
     
  16. K Factor

    K Factor A Concerned Indian Senior Member

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    Well, else what?

    The $ 10,000,000,000 package is being discussed in USA, so they need to show that they are doing something. Thats it. Had they been serious, they would have sent in the real PA, not the Frontier Constabulary (Paramils) to Buner and Dir.:((
     
  17. venkat

    venkat Regular Member

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    Dont trust the drama!
     
  18. Vinod2070

    Vinod2070 मध्यस्थ Stars and Ambassadors

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    Is it a town in Bajaur? I know they pretty much levelled the Bajaur town, displacing hundreds of thousands of civilians but the town is still with the Taliban!
     
  19. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    They are totally going wrong way, the way they were going that they are fighting a war not any counter terror operation,what will happen, that can be some how predicted.

    1. Using Heavy Gunship and Heavy artillery will destroy human habitats in the area.

    2. Millions of Homeless( that are hapenning now).

    3. More Civilians killed rather than Talibans.

    4. Humanitarian crisis like Northern Sri Lanka.

    5. No Military Solutions , as I see Pakistan Army simply can not evict Taliban from Buner.

    6. Again restart of Negotiations.

    7. Withdrawal of Pakistan Army , virtually acknowledging Taliban control in Buner leaving future of Pakistan danger.

    Above prediction is my personal opinion and every respected member has his/her view on this.
    I will be very happy if each of my prediction proves wrong in coming days , and the outcome is opposite to my prediction.

    Regards
     
  20. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Yes, its a town in Bajaur. Here is a link to what happened in Loe Sam Bajaur.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/11/world/asia/11pstan.html

    An excert from above link

     

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