Pakistan political discussions

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by A.V., Feb 16, 2009.

  1. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Govt frees 12 Taliban prisoners in Swat

    * Sharia implementation in Malakand from next week as govt-TNSM talks succeed

    Ghulam Farooq and Saleem Athar

    MINGORA: The government on Saturday released 12 Taliban prisoners after a meeting in Swat of a delegation of the Tehreek-Nifaz-e-Shariat Muhammadi (TNSM) and the NWFP government.

    Awami National Party (ANP) NWFP President Afrasiyab Khattak, provincial Information Minister Iftikhar Hussain, the Malakand division commissioner, and representatives of the TNSM and the local peace committee attended the meeting.

    Sharia: It was decided that sharia would be formally implemented in Malakand region, including Swat district, from next week after the government released the 12 Taliban, a spokesman for a pro-Taliban cleric said.

    They agreed to open the Qambar-Takhtaband road, Amir Izzat Khan, spokesman for TNSM chief Sufi Muhammad said.

    The spokesman said it was also decided that qazis would begin taking up cases under the Islamic law from March 12, three days prior to an earlier deadline of March 15 set by the TNSM chief.

    Earlier on Friday, NWFP Chief Minister Ameer Haider Hoti had said that his government would not free Taliban prisoners who were in the black and grey categories of security agencies, but had promised to release those falling in the white category.

    Official sources said no prominent Taliban was among the freed prisoners, who were set free at the Circuit House in Mingora.

    Meanwhile, unidentified men abducted six people from Saidu Sharif tehsil of Mingora, witnesses said.

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009\03\08\story_8-3-2009_pg7_13
     
  2. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    US to step up attacks on Pakistan as it forces Taliban to talk

    US to step up attacks on Pakistan as it forces Taliban to talk

    *The United States is planning to escalate aerial bombing raids on Pakistan's tribal areas in tandem with efforts to force moderate elements of the Taliban to the negotiating table, the Telegraph has learned.

    [​IMG]
    US President Barack Obama stands during Columbus Police
    Department graduation ceremonies at the Aladdin Shrine Center
    in Columbus, Ohio Photo: AFP / GETTY IMAGES


    By Dean Nelson in New Delhi and Ben Farmer in Kabul
    Last Updated: 7:35AM GMT 09 Mar 2009


    Officials in contact with the State Department said on Sunday that a new offensive would see a dramatic increase in Predator drone attacks on Taliban targets in defiance of Pakistani objections to cross-border attacks.

    President Barack Obama on Sunday admitted that the US military was pushing for talks with the Taliban, but officials consulted on the plans said the military conflict would be raised to new levels of intensity before talks could begin. "There will be talks but the Taliban are going to experience a lot of pain first, on both sides of the border," said one senior Western diplomat.

    There are hopes of establishing a "hammer and anvil" encirclement of the Taliban with the Pakistan Army expected to extend its bombardment of terrorist safe havens within the Tribal Area's Bajaur agency.

    President Obama told the New York Times that the United States was not winning the war in Afghanistan as he hinted at the possibility of talks with the Taliban insurgents. The US leader said General David Petraeus, one of the key strategists in the war on al-Qaeda and its allies, believed "part of the success in Iraq involved reaching out to people that we would consider to be Islamic fundamentalists.

    "At the heart of a new Afghanistan policy is going to be a smarter Pakistan policy," Mr Obama said. "As long as you have got safe havens in these border regions that the Pakistani government can't control or reach in effective ways, we're going to continue to see vulnerability on the Afghan side of the border.

    "And so it's very important for us to reach out to the Pakistani government and work with them more effectively."

    That new “smarter policy” has been assigned to former US ambassador to the United Nations, Richard Holbrooke, the architect of the Dayton Accord which ended the war in Bosnia. Mr Holbrooke has in turn appointed Afghan policy expert Barnett Rubin, who supports talks with the Taliban to solve the conflict, as his advisor, it was confirmed last night, subject to security clearance.

    In an article in Foreign Affairs magazine last December, Mr Rubin proposed a ‘grand bargain’ in which NATO would end military action if the Taliban agreed “to prohibit the use of Afghan (or Pakistani) territory for international terrorism”. Such an agreement would "constitute a strategic defeat for al-Qaeda,” he wrote."

    Pakistani officials are braced for more fighting in the border region. Lieutenant-General Talat Masood, an influential retired senior Pakistan Army officer, said: "There will no let up in drone attacks, and no let up on Pakistan to do more on its territory."

    Officials plan to augment intensified attacks with a new elite police force drawn from special forces to hold areas cleared of Taliban. There is also a blueprint for training and equipping the paramilitary Frontier Corps to fight an effective counter-insurgency campaign. Funds would be found for a humanitarian package to help tribal groups rebuild homes and villages destroyed in the cross-fire.

    An estimated 300,000 people have been displaced by helicopter gunship strikes in Bajuar alone. America will provide much of the resources and officials are developing guidelines to ensure the money does not get siphoned away by American consultancy firms.

    Royal Marine Lieutenant General Jim Dutton, deputy commander of Nato-led forces in Afghanistan, said that without a crackdown in Pakistan the Taliban was a much more determined opponent. "When there have been ceasefire deals on the eastern border with Pakistan, it's been easier for insurgents to move freely across the border," he said. "When they have felt they were under pressure from the Pakistani army, that freedom to move has been curtailed."

    Afghan President Hamid Karzai, last night welcomed President Obama's hint that dialogue with "moderate" Taliban leaders might be possible: "It is very good news. This is the Afghan government's long stand."


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...on-Pakistan-as-it-forces-Taliban-to-talk.html
     
  3. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Musharraf offers to become President again

    9 Mar 2009, 2009 hrs IST, PTI


    KARACHI: With the situation in Pakistan raising concerns, former military ruler Pervez Musharraf said he would consider becoming President again if he could play a useful role in the post even as he ruled out joining any political party.

    Musharraf also opposed US drone attacks in Pakistan's tribal belt but said the country should take action to kill and root out the foreign militants sheltering in the region bordering Afghanistan. "If I am offered the post of President and if I can be a useful President...then I will want to contribute to this country," Musharraf said. Addressing a news conference here on his return from a four-day visit to India, Musharraf however made it clear that he did not "want to be a useless President".

    He was answering a question about his remarks in India on the possibility of becoming President again. Musharraf, who resigned as President in August last year to avoid impeachment by the Pakistan People's Party-led government, said he had no plans to join any political party.

    "I am not joining any political party. In the current environment, I have no intention of joining politics. Frankly, I haven't given any serious thought to joining politics," he said in response to another question.

    Pakistan has been hit by stand-off between the PPP and the main opposition PML-N since the latter's leaders Nawaz and Shahbaz Sharif were barred by the Supreme Court from contesting polls and holding elected office.


    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...ecome_President_again/articleshow/4246650.cms
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    US Missile Attacks On Pakistan To “Dramatically Increase”: Report

    http://www.prisonplanet.com/us-missile-attacks-on-pakistan-to-dramatically-increase-report.html


    US Missile Attacks On Pakistan To “Dramatically Increase”: Report

    Officials briefed on the plans say Obama to raise military conflict to new levels of intensity

    Steve Watson
    Infowars.net
    Monday, March 9, 2009

    A British newspaper says that officials in contact with the US State Department have been briefed on plans to intensify military attacks on Pakistan, despite strong objections to the policy from the Pakistani government.

    A new offensive would see a dramatic increase in Predator drone attacks on Taliban targets, reports the London Telegraph, which says it learned of the plans from State Department contacts and senior diplomats.

    The report states:

    President Barack Obama on Sunday admitted that the US military was pushing for talks with the Taliban, but officials consulted on the plans said the military conflict would be raised to new levels of intensity before talks could begin. “There will be talks but the Taliban are going to experience a lot of pain first, on both sides of the border,” said one senior Western diplomat.

    Pakistani authorities have consistently voiced opposition to cross border missile strikes, which have killed hundreds of innocent civilians.

    Obama is seemingly oblivious to this given his statement last week that “it’s very important for us to reach out to the Pakistani government and work with them more effectively.”

    It seems that the new president is forging ahead with his campaign promise to shift the focus of the war on terror into Pakistan, stepping up the policy of unmanned airstrikes which have been ongoing for years.

    Obama has also recently beefed the U.S. military role in Pakistan beyond that pursued by the Bush administration and “expanded the covert war run by the Central Intelligence Agency inside Pakistan,” according to the New York Times, with an increase in missile attacks by drone aircraft.

    Pakistani officials also believe that the drones are taking off from Pakistani airfields, a claim that has been backed by chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Diane Feinstein.

    (Article continues below)

    US Missile Attacks On Pakistan To Dramatically Increase: Report obamadecept_340x169

    Obama recently demanded a total of around $800 billion in war funds and subsidiary costs just to cover the rest of 2009.

    He has also promised to to send at least 17,000, and eventually perhaps as many as 30,000, extra troops to Afghanistan - over seven years after the U.S. invaded in 2001.

    Meanwhile, despite public pronouncements by Obama that a plan to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq is in progress, the details of the agreement actually establish a permanent presence of a sizable occupying force of 50,000 troops in perpetuity.

    All this within just two months of Obama’s inauguration on the back of an election campaign won on the basis of changing the warmongering policies of the Bush administration!

    As alluded to in the London Telegraph report, the intensification policy comes via the new special U.S. representative to Pakistan and Afghanistan, Richard Holbrooke. A prominent member of the board of directors of the Council on Foreign Relations and a consummate insider, Holbrooke has been dubbed “Obama’s Neocon”.
     
  5. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  6. Triton

    Triton Founding Member

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    Pakistan to go ahead with IPI project even without India: Zardari

    Pakistan to go ahead with IPI project even without India: Zardari

    Related News:
    Daily Times: Pakistan to continue IPI project even if India quits: Zardari
     
  7. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    Would Iran still go ahead with the pipeline ??? I mean, India has serious concerns over the pipeline going through Pakistani territory... and, Pakistan is not the most stable nation in the world right now...

    I mean, how much gas can Pakistan\'s requirement be??? Definitely not as much as India\'s....

    Will this pipeline still be a feasible proposition given that it does not cater to its main target audience and that the demand from Pakistan may not be that much after all...
     
  8. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    NATO supply truck torched in Pakistan: Police

    NATO supply truck torched in Pakistan: Police

    QUETTA: Gunmen in Pakistan torched a truck carrying supplies for NATO forces in neighbouring Afghanistan, leaving its driver and a helper
    wounded, police said.

    Gunmen snatched the truck in Baluchistan province's Soorab, 200 kilometres south of Quetta, and set it ablaze after wounding the driver and his helper, senior police official Khaild Baqi said.

    "The injuries to the driver were serious, but his helper's condition is stable," Baqi said.

    Police chased the attackers and traded fire with them, but the search for them was continuing, he added.

    Baqi said some 150 truckers parked their vehicles to protest against the attack but that the authorities were negotiating to persuade them to continue their journeys.

    NATO and US-led forces in landlocked Afghanistan are hugely dependent on Pakistan for supplies and equipment, around 80 percent of which is transported through Pakistan.

    Nobody claimed the responsibility for the attack. Baluchistan has been rocked by a four-year insurgency waged by tribal rebels fighting for political autonomy and a greater share of profits from the region's natural resources.

    The province has also been hit by attacks blamed on Taliban militants.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...ed-in-Pakistan-Police/articleshow/4250870.cms
     
  9. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  10. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  11. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Pakistan_And_The_Ministry_Of_Jihadization_999.html

    Pakistan And The Ministry Of Jihadization

    by M.D. Nalapat
    Manipal, India (UPI) Mar 11, 2009

    Say this for Pakistan's army -- its aftershave works. It seems to reduce to blobs of helpless jelly the critical faculties of U.S. "experts" on Pakistan within the CIA, the State Department and the Department of Defense.

    Since the jihadization of the military by Pakistan's former president Gen. Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq in the 1970s, the officer corps has continued as a force multiplier for the numerous terror groups headquartered in urban and rural communities across the country.

    Except for Jehangir Karamat, the former chief of army staff who accepted his 1998 dismissal by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, no chief of army staff since Zia-ul-Haq (1976-1988) has paid heed to the elected civilian government of Pakistan in matters considered by the military to be within its purview.

    These include the portfolios of defense, interior, foreign affairs and now the prime minister's office, as well as subjects such as assistance to terror organizations and the nuclear deterrent. Such an arrangement has had the tacit acquiescence of every North Atlantic Treaty Organization country -- including those that specialize in delivering sermons on democracy and human rights.

    Despite the armed forces' control over areas considered key to the functioning of government in any major country, both India and the United Kingdom are enthusiastic in insisting that Pakistan remain within "value-based" forums like the Commonwealth. They also back every loan application Pakistan makes to the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, despite the kleptomania of its higher echelons. Admittedly, this trait of Pakistan is shared with many countries in the world, including India.

    As for the United States, no country has lavished more treasure on Pakistan -- not even the two runners-up in the "Santa Claus" sweepstakes, Saudi Arabia and China.

    The generals in Islamabad have found a new champion in U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., who seems eager to funnel billions of U.S. taxpayers' dollars to a state whose key functions are controlled by accessories of Jihad International.

    U.S. President Barack Obama has made a few comments about ensuring that the Pakistani military withdraws from jihad and from governance. However, Obama now seems to be following the lead of former U.S. President Bill Clinton, whose tenure saw a sharp rise in the influence of jihadists within the Pakistani military, helped along by complaisant U.S. envoys. It was during the Clinton presidency that Saudi Arabia and the United States helped the Pakistani army set up the Taliban.

    Sometimes hindsight produces clarity of vision, but in the case of Pakistan, the United States has seemed almost blind throughout four decades of involvement in the country.

    Since 2005, Pakistan's army has been using its multiple and credulous contacts within the U.S. policy and academic establishments to press its line of engagement with the "good Taliban." These are the people who believe women should neither study nor work, except in the house, and that minorities have the same "rights" as Jews did in Nazi Germany.

    By surrendering the Swat Valley to the Taliban, the army in Pakistan has created a safe haven for al-Qaida to continue its mission of converting the entire country into a safe haven for terrorists, as Afghanistan was under the Taliban.

    Expert at managing the media, Pakistan's military under Gen. Ashfaq Kayani -- an officer in the social and ideological mold of his hero Zia-ul-Haq -- has ensured a steady flow of reports in the Western media pointing out the obvious: that President Asif Ali Zardari is a playboy known to have made money through means other than saving a percentage of his official salary.

    What such commentaries fail to consider is that Zardari is a Sufi, whose family has been bred in the syncretic and moderate traditions of that philosophy, and that he has sought to delink the Pakistani establishment from the terror networks that operate today in the country with near impunity.

    With his prime minister, defense minister, interior minister and foreign minister taking orders from Kayani rather than from himself, Zardari has found his authority ebbing away. Despite Zardari's recent decision to endorse the army-sponsored deal with the so-called moderate Taliban in Swat, the embattled president is likely to be confronted by a slew of charges that Kayani hopes will force his resignation.

    Instead, it is Kayani's head that should roll. Under his watch Pakistan has abandoned even the pretense of fighting the Taliban and other terror networks -- a charade that former President Pervez Musharraf maintained to the military's great advantage.

    Pakistan's current president needs to appoint an army chief of his choice. He needs to ensure, through amendments to the law, that this appointee behaves not as an overlord but as a professional soldier, based on the U.S. model. Subsequently, jihadist elements should be ruthlessly winnowed out of the Pakistani army's officer corps, and the special privileges given to jihadists since the 1970s should be withdrawn in stages.

    Such surgery may seem drastic, but unless it is carried out, Pakistan will continue its descent into Talibanization. The bold and the beautiful in the country's urban centers will be swallowed up the way their counterparts in Afghanistan were during the 1990s.

    Kerry is wrong. Pakistan needs major surgery and not coddling. Unless the civilian government headed by Zardari is empowered by the international community to conduct such an operation, and unless Nawaz Sharif is warned away from his current flirtation with the military brass and their terrorist associates, within five years Kerry will need to convene a series of Senate hearings on "why Pakistan failed."

    Although his ignorance of ground realities in Pakistan is appalling, Kerry is regrettably hardly alone. Practically all of the NATO "experts" on Pakistan are as blind to the looming future as they were in the previous decade about the real nature of the Taliban.

    The civilized world is already in a war, and Pakistan is the major theater. Unless it gives battle now, the West will face a much more deadly battle within the next five years, just as the Allies did from 1939 to 1945, after they ignored the Nazi storm from 1936 to 1938.

    (Professor M.D. Nalapat is vice chair of the Manipal Advanced Research Group, UNESCO peace chair and professor of geopolitics at Manipal University. Copyright M.D. Nalapat.)

    (United Press International's "Outside View" commentaries are written by outside contributors who specialize in a variety of important issues. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of United Press International. In the interests of creating an open forum, original submissions are invited.)
     
  12. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009/03/12/story_12-3-2009_pg13_7

    Police taken hostage while arresting 3/3 suspect

    * Alleged terrorist’s neighbours disarm police, help Ali Shair escape
    * Advocate says villagers got furious after police opened indiscriminate fire, injured children

    By Rana Tanveer

    LAHORE: One of the suspects of the Liberty terrorist attack who was arrested managed to escape after his neighbours intervened and attacked the police party, eventually taking the police as hostages, :D Daily Times learnt on Wednesday.

    Sources said on directions of the Sahiwal district police officer (DPO), the City Chichawatni Police Station House Officer (SHO) Rao Shafqaat along with Elite Force personnel ;;), raided and arrested one Ali Shair from the jurisdiction of Renala Police Station in Okara. The police had wanted Shair for his alleged involvement in the 3/3 terrorist attack in Lahore and several other cases of murder and robbery. The Punjab government had announced Rs 600,000 as his head money.

    Police robbed: Police sources said they had arrested Shair but his neighbours succeeded in arranging his escape by taking the police as hostages after seizing their weapons. :sAni_monkey:They said the accused escaped with nine sub machine guns, one 444-bore rifle, two 30-bore pistols, a wireless set, six mobile phones, and Rs 50,000 in cash after robbing the police. :helpsmilie::D However, after intervention of other police officers, the hostages were released. They said over 200 people attacked the police with sophisticated weapons and took the policemen as hostages. They said the policemen were seen in torn uniform:drink: after the attack of villagers and were admitted at the Sahiwal District Headquarters Hospital for treatment.

    No case had been registered against the accused for attacking or robbing police officials until the filing of this report. Instead, Advocate Mehmood filed a first information report (FIR) against the station house officer (SHO) and nine unidentified policemen at the Renala Police Station for injuring his brother Asif.:35::D He said Asif was playing in the village when policemen opened indiscriminate fire and injured him. Mehmood said the act of opening indiscriminate fire had angered the people, who then attacked the police. He denied knowing Shair and alleged there was no criminal in sight.

    Renala Police Station moharrar Amjad Hussain said the injured police officials had not filed a complaint for registration of the FIR. He said SHO Rao Shafqaat was in the hospital after suffering serious injuries. He said the other policemen were in stable condition. The moharrar said the area had been declared a zone extremely unsafe for the police:D:sAni_monkey: but it still raided the area to arrest the criminal.
     
  13. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/mar/12/pakistan-benazir-bhutto
     
  14. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.telegraphindia.com/1090313/jsp/frontpage/story_10663480.jsp

    Pak vacuum worry
    SUJAN DUTTA AND JAYANTH JACOB

    New Delhi, March 12: Pakistan is a country at war with itself and even army rule cannot create a power centre that Delhi can talk to, inputs that went to a high-level meeting to draft a short-term response to the neighbour have suggested.

    The short-notice meeting of the cabinet committee on security was called by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh at his 7 Race Course Road residence today.

    The meeting followed reports that the regime in Islamabad was tottering after Pakistan’s army chief, General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, met Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani. Over last night and this morning, there has been a clampdown on protesters and police are arresting lawyers on a “long march” to Islamabad. ( )

    “Right now, it is the army versus Zardari; Zardari versus Gilani; Gilani versus Sharif and Zardari. Nawaz Sharif's political stock is improving but he has never been the best of friends with the army,” an officer in the Indian security establishment said.

    “Then there are the Taliban forces trying to carve out their own territories. Actually, it is everyone for himself, leaving us in New Delhi not knowing who to talk to and who to listen to,” he said.

    The officer did not mention the US, which announced millions of dollars in military aid to Pakistan that total just about Rs 15,000 crore short of the defence allocation of Rs 1.40 lakh crore for India’s armed forces.

    In public, Indian foreign minister Pranab Mukherjee said he expected Pakistan to sort itself out.

    The immediate concern for India is that there will not even be a “de jure” power centre to deal with.

    One of the drafts that went up to the cabinet committee on security, at which national security adviser M.K. Narayanan presented a paper, said Zardari, Sharif, the ISI and the army were contenders for power. As were different groups of the Taliban in Swat and Waziristan. Former dictator Pervez Musharraf is also seen as a contender though he has ruled himself out of a race.

    India is watching if Kayani will engineer a coup that will lead to army rule directly or whether he will foist a civilian leader, like General Moeen did in Bangladesh with a civilian chief adviser before he allowed elections in December 2008 after 23 months of effective army rule.

    The crisis in Pakistan runs so deep now, said an official, that even whipping up anti-India hysteria may not unite the forces within its elite.
     
  15. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Pakistan's only hope

    Pakistan's only hope

    Immediately after the terror assault on the visiting Sri Lankan cricket team in Lahore, several Pakistani politicians, media personalities and a
    former ISI chief tried to put the blame on India for the attack, claiming that it was a reprisal for Mumbai's 26/11.
    This was more than just an unthinking knee-jerk reaction; it was a galvanic twitch, a symptom revealing the deep-seated neural disorder that has afflicted Pakistan ever since its genesis and which, untreated, has now brought it perilously close to being if not a failed state at least one best put in quarantine.
    The real disease that is destroying Pakistan is not the Taliban; the Taliban both the 'bad Taliban' and the 'good Taliban', as the US would have it itself is a symptom of an underlying pathology: a monomaniacal hatred and fear of India.

    It is this single-point non-agenda that led to the birth of Pakistan; it is the same agenda that has dictated all its policies, in foreign and domestic affairs, for more than 60 years; it is the same agenda which today has brought it to the brink of political, social and economic bankruptcy, dreaded and shunned by the international community.

    When is Islamabad going to realise what it ought to have realised long ago: that far from being its most implacable enemy which has to be fought to mutual death if necessary, India ought to be, and could be made to be, its staunchest ally, its closest friend and its last and only hope of survival?

    If that sounds preposterous that is only because we in India have over the years of hostility possibly been almost, if not equally, brainwashed as Pakistanis into believing that perpetual ping-pong vendetta with our neighbour is part of our collective karma, engraved into our national genetic code.
    Far from being a utopian pipe dream, an 'Indi-Paki bhai-bhai' scenario is the only solution to Pakistan's escalating problems which threaten to plunge the whole region into catastrophic turmoil which could lead to nuclear Armageddon if extremist militias, swiftly gaining ascendancy there, wrest control of Islamabad's nuclear arsenal from the state and the army.

    Why should the people of Pakistan the politicians, the businessmen, the farmers, the students, the media commentators, as distinct from the army, the ISI, and the ISI-created terror militias which have now turned against their creators try to overcome their self-destructive paranoia about India? For several good reasons. It is widely acknowledged that the best antidote to Pakistan's life-threatening malignancies is a health-restoring infusion of democracy.
    In an embattled South Asia, from Sri Lanka, through Nepal and Bangladesh to Pakistan itself, India stands out as the lone beacon of democracy, about to embark on general elections which represent the biggest democratic exercise in the world.

    As a democracy and an open society where a vigilant media is quick to bring any dirty tricks to public light, India can't and wouldn't, through RAW or any other agency, export terror to Pakistan as Pakistan's ISI has allegedly been doing to India. Instead of trying to subvert Pakistan, it is in democratic India's best interests to ensure greater stability for its unruly and volatile neighbour, so that the cost of constant conflict that is crippling both countries can be brought down and both parties can get on with the daunting task of combating the global slowdown and protecting the interests of the aam aadmi on both sides of the border.

    Sceptics will say there isn't a hope in hell that Pakistan could ever bring itself to think of India as a potential friend instead of a predestined foe. And perhaps they're right. Perhaps there isn't any hope; only a mutually inflicted hell that both Pakistan and we must face. Are we, in Pakistan and in India, ready and willing to accept that?

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Subverse/Pakistans-only-hope/articleshow/4241668.cms
     
  16. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    67 Pakistanis were detained at Guantanamo

    Sixty-seven Pakistanis were detained at Cuba's Guantanamo Bay prison managed by Central Intelligence Agency of the US following the 9/11 terror attack, a minister has informed the National Assembly.

    According to a written reply submitted to the lower house of the parliament Thursday, 67 Pakistanis were taken to the Guantanamo Bay prison facility. However, as a result of the government’s efforts, so far, 62 of them had been released, Dawn News reported.

    Foreign Minister Makhdoom Shah Mehmood Qureshi provided the information in response to a question asked by Tariq Mehmood Bajwa, a member of the National Assembly.

    "Following the 9/11 terror strike, scores of Pakistanis were picked up by the law enforcement agencies and handed over to the US authorities and 67 of them ended up at the Guantanamo Bay," the report said.

    US President Barack Obama has ordered the closure of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp within a year.

    Former president General Pervez Musharraf in his memoir "In the Line of Fire" had accepted that the Pakistani government had earned millions of rupees as bounty after handing over alleged terrorists to the US officials.
     
  17. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    U.S. Keeping Close Eye on Pakistan says Adm. Mike Mullen

    U.S. officials are keeping a close watch on the current unrest in Pakistan, a country that is key to NATO’s efforts in Afghanistan, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said yesterday. Pakistani lawyers and activists are marching on Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan, calling for an independent judicial branch. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen said on PBS’s “Charlie Rose Show” that American officials are watching the events and the Pakistani government’s response closely.

    “I’ve been engaged from the standpoint of understanding what’s going on there, and I know that their people are concerned that this could degenerate into a situation that could very possibly generate a crisis, which may cause actions to be taken on the part of the military,” Mullen said.

    The possibility that the Pakistani military will move is remote right now, but it has taken a hand in politics before, Mullen noted. Former President Pervez Musharraf was a Pakistani army chief who took control of the country.

    Mullen has met with his Pakistani counterpart, Army Gen. Ashfaq Kiyani, 10 times since the chairman took office in October 2007.

    “He is committed to a civilian government; he is committed to the democracy that’s there,” Mullen told Rose. “And in my view, the last thing in the world he wants to do … is takeover as President Musharraf did.”

    The Pakistani military wants to stay out of politics, and Kiyani wants to do what is right, but is in a tough spot, Mullen said. “I’m just hopeful that doesn’t turn into another crisis in Pakistan,” he said.

    At the heart of the security uncertainty in Pakistan is the Taliban, which is using the country’s western border to rest and refit for combat against NATO forces in Afghanistan. The Taliban also are exerting control in the Swat Valley — formerly a tourist spot some 70 miles from Islamabad.

    Kiyani “recognizes that he has an extremist threat in Pakistan,” Mullen said. “They’ve lost many, many citizens. He recognizes there’s a serious extremist, terrorist threat inside his country and, in fact, his forces have fought very hard this year up in Bajaur, and Mohman, up on the western border.”

    The terrorist attacks in Mumbai, India, in November further complicated the situation, Mullen said. Terrorists are believed to have planned the attack in India’s financial capital from Pakistan, and the small-group attack chilled relations between the two nuclear-armed countries. Following the attack, Kiyani had to turn his attention to his country’s border with India.

    “He’s a chief that’s got threats coming from both directions,” Mullen said. In the U.S. perspective, diplomacy is needed for relations with India, and more troops are needed for the actions against the Taliban.

    Mullen said that many people around the world are worried about ties between Pakistan’s intelligence agency and the extremists.

    “They have been very attached to many of these extremist organizations, and it’s my belief that in the long run, they have got to completely cut ties with those in order to really move in the right direction,” the chairman said.

    Kiyani has appointed a new intelligence chief with the mission to bring the agency under control. Mullen said he is encouraged, but change will take time.

    The Taliban and al-Qaida safe havens in Pakistan are the most difficult problems facing the region, Mullen said.

    “We have this safe haven in a sovereign country that is threatening, plotting against Americans and other Western countries, and it must be eliminated,” Mullen said. “Ideally, that would come through the pressure that the Pakistanis bring to eliminate that threat.”

    But if the terrorists manage to launch an attack on the United States or its allies, that would change the equation. America and its allies would be forced to respond.

    “What we’re working hard on is trying to make sure that doesn’t happen,” the chairman said.
     
  18. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    US to go ahead with attacking terrorists inside Pak

    http://www.ptinews.com/pti\ptisite.nsf/0/9151AEE8A5AAE08C6525757900515B20?OpenDocument

    US to go ahead with attacking terrorists inside Pak: Mullen



    Lalit K Jha
    Washington, Mar 14 (PTI) United States would go ahead and hit high value targets inside Pakistan if Washington felt threatened from this part of the world, a top US military official has said.

    Admiral Mike Mullen, Chairman, Joint Chief of Staff, who interacts regularly with the Pakistani Army and its political leadership, told the PBS news channel that the US would go ahead and hit the high value targets inside Pakistan, based on actionable intelligence.

    He said the US would not hesitate in striking inside Pakistani territories if the next attack to the US came from this part of the world.

    Mullen said he has made this view of the Obama administration clear to the Pakistani leadership.

    I think he (Pakistani Army Chief, Gen Ashfaq Parvez Kayani) fully understands that, and its a conversation Ive had many times, not just with the military leadership, but also the political leadership, that any President of the United States would respond to an attack on US citizens, another attack coming out of the FATA to strike the United States, and any President would have no choice, Mullen said in an interview to the channel.

    They understand that very clearly, and they dont disagree with that. It makes sense to them. Thats certainly a solemn duty that we have here, he underlined. PTI


    strange that mullen is stating this to the pakistani army -as if they control the terrorists?
     
  19. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect...s-centcom-adviser-sees-pakistan-in-danger--za

    US CENTCOM adviser sees Pakistan in danger
    By Anwar Iqbal
    Monday, 23 Mar, 2009 | 01:44 AM PST |

    WASHINGTON: The Pakistani state could collapse within six months if immediate steps are not taken to remedy the situation, warned a top adviser to the US Central Command.

    David Kilcullen, who advises CENTCOM commander Gen. David H. Petraeus on the war on terror, urged US policy makers to focus their attention on Pakistan as a failure there could have devastating consequences for the entire international community.

    In an interview to The Washington Post published on Sunday, Kilcullen, who is credited with the success of the US troop surge strategy in Iraq, warned that if Pakistan went out of control, it would ‘dwarf’ all the crises in the world today.

    ‘Pakistan…hands down. No doubt,’ he said when asked to name the central front in the war against terror.

    Asked to explain why he thought Pakistan was so important, Kilcullen said: ‘Pakistan has 173 million people, 100 nuclear weapons, an army bigger than the US Army, and al-Qaeda headquarters sitting right there in the two-thirds of the country that the government doesn’t control.’

    He claimed that the Pakistani military and police and intelligence service did not follow the civilian government; they were essentially a rogue state within a state.

    ‘Were now reaching the point where within one to six months we could see the collapse of the Pakistani state, also because of the global financial crisis, which just exacerbates all these problems,” he said.

    ‘The collapse of Pakistan, al-Qaeda acquiring nuclear weapons, an extremist takeover -- that would dwarf everything we’ve seen in the war on terror today.’

    Kilcullen, an Australian anthropologist who advises governments on Muslim militancy throughout the West, disagreed with the suggestion that it was important to kill or capture Osama bin laden.

    He discussed two possible scenarios for catching the al-Qaeda leader. Scenario one is, American commandos shoot their way into some valley in Pakistan and kill bin Laden.

    This, Kilcullen said, would not end the war on terror and would make bin Laden a martyr.

    The second scenario: a tribal raiding party captures bin Laden, puts him on television and says, ‘You are a traitor to Islam and you have killed more Muslims than you have killed infidels, and we’re now going to deal with you.’ They could either then try and execute the guy in accordance with their own laws or hand him over to the International Criminal Court.

    ‘If that happened, that would be the end of the al-Qaeda myth,’ said Kilcullen.

    He said that three lessons learned in Iraq could also apply to Afghanistan. The first one is to protect the population. ‘Unless people feel safe, they won’t be willing to engage in unarmed politics,’ he argued.

    The second lesson is to focus on getting the population on America’s side and making them self-defending. And then a third lesson is to make a long-term commitment.

    Kilcullen said that the Obama administration’s policy of reaching out to moderate elements of the Taliban also had several pitfalls.

    ‘If the Taliban sees that we’re negotiating for a stay of execution or to stave off defeat, that’s going to harden their resolve,’ he warns.

    ‘I’m all for negotiating, but I think the chances of achieving a mass wave of people turning against the Taliban are somewhat lower in Afghanistan than they were in Iraq.’
     
  20. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    beans are spilling big time

    India Today - India's most widely read magazine.

    Taliban set for war against India from Pak soil
    Abhisar Sharma
    New Delhi/Swat Valley, March 25, 2009

    Every evening in Pakistan's Swat Valley an FM radio station screams out one Taliban fatwah after the other. Mullah Fazalullah, also known as Mullah Radio, the uncrowned monarch of Swat, issues his orders through his radio station.

    “India is our enemy,” says Md Bilal, leader, Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP).

    Shariah in Pak

    Bilal is the second-in-command of Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan. He is the right hand man of Maulana Fazlullah, and is believed to be the real brains behind the illegal FM Radio station in Swat.

    Speaking exclusively to Headlines Today, Mohd Bilal chalked out TTP's plan to enforce Shariah in the whole of Pakistan.

    “Shariah should be imposed in Pakistan”, said Md Bilal.

    Israel, America and India are Taliban's enemies, Bilal spells it out clearly. Bilal even goes on to say that TTP is ready to help Pakistan in case of a war with India, but that only if Shariah is imposed in all of Pakistan.

    Taking over

    While Pakistan government has been releasing Taliban terrorists in droves, ever since the peace deal was agreed upon in Swat, Bilal wants every single Taliban to be set free. Till then the man vows to carry on his crusade against the government of Pakistan.

    “All of us should be set free, we are slaves as of now,” said Bilal.

    Clearly for Asif Zardari the options are not too many and time is running out as the Taliban seems eager to take over Pakistan.
     

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