Pakistan political discussions

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by A.V., Feb 16, 2009.

  1. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    yes good question.:D
     
  2. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Taliban_bombs_made_with_British_electronics_report_999.html

    Taliban bombs made with British electronics:

    Some roadside bombs used by the Taliban in Afghanistan include electronic parts that originally came from Britain and were supplied by British Muslims, the Daily Telegraph reported Saturday.

    According to the newspaper, which did not cite its source, the devices, which were used to activate bombs via remote control, were either sent to sympathisers in neighbouring countries or carried in by volunteers who flew to Pakistan and crossed the border into Afghanistan.

    It reported that an explosives officer told British Foreign Secretary David Miliband of the findings while the minister was in Afghanistan on a two-day visit this past week.

    "We have found electronic components in devices used to target British troops that originally come from Britain," the unnamed officer told Miliband during a briefing.

    Miliband subsequently asked how the parts would have reached Afghanistan, the officer replied that they had either been sent there or had been physically carried into the country by Britons.

    "The insurgents in Afghanistan have changed their tactics meaning they now use more and more improvised explosive devices than before," a Ministry of Defence spokesman in London said.

    "IEDs pose a significant threat to the safety of our forces and we are looking at ways we can improve protection from them."

    There are around 8,300 British soldiers in Afghanistan as part of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), many of whom are based in Helmand, where the Taliban is waging a bloody insurgency against Western and Afghan security forces.

    Last month, Defence Secretary John Hutton signalled he was considering boosting the number of British troops and equipment there, saying his top priority was protecing the country's soldiers against IEDs used by the Taliban.
     
  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    bangladeshi article on iran -pakistan tensions

    http://newsfrombangladesh.net/view.php?hidRecord=248341

    Pakistan - Iran tensions who is Behind?

    There was no justification of attack on Pakistan embassy in Tehran and burning of Pakistani flag by some Iranian thugs and enemies of friendship between the two countries in front of police? There is no doubt that Shia-Sunni clashes in tribal areas of Pakistan are work of enemies of Pakistan . It is an internal matter no one should take sides and get into the trap of Iranian Shia Left and Pakistani stooges. Unfortunately if Iran has foreign agents in hundreds current numbers in Pakistan might be in thousands? Pakistan has its own problems and so is Iran ? Pakistanis have always been tolerant and had inclusive approach never put religious beliefs in choosing its politicians.

    According to news reports on 18th February 2009, “protesting against Shia-Sunni clashes of Parachinar, hundred or so Iranians attacked Pakistan Embassy in front of the security services and police. They held placards saying “Death to Wahabies”, “Death to Taliban”, “Death to Yazidyaat”, “Death to America ” “Death to American allies”, etc.

    This development is rattling some Sunni Arab governments, but for Washington , it could be a chance to build bridges with the region's Shiites, especially in Iran ”.

    Those who have been shouting anti-Taliban slogans in Iran and burning Pakistan flag must know that it was half Iranian Shia, Benzair Bhutto who supported, nurtured and created Taliban with the support of her foreign masters. Benazir’s minister Nasser Ullah Babur use to call Taliban ‘my boys’. She apologized for creating and supporting Taliban at London School of Economics in front of large a gathering in May 2007. Religion in politics does not matter in Pakistan ? Iran should be careful with its Shia Left and Right!

    Pakistan's Shias are very well integrated with full liberty to practice their faith in harmony with the majority Sunni population. There are approximately 14000 registered Sunni and 380 Shia madrassas in Pakistan , which are functioning peacefully according to the Ministry of Religious Affairs.

    ZA Bhutto was Shia introduced in politics by Skandar Mirz (who was from the line of traitor Mir Jafar) a staunch Shia currently buried in Mashhad – Iran. His Iranian wife Naheed Skindar Mirza was wife of Iranian Military Attaché in Islamabad whom SM started an affair before her divorce. She was instrumental in 2nd Marriage of Zulifqar Ali Bhutto with Nusrat Isphani mother of Benazir.

    Benazir Bhutto was married by a Shia Imam to Asif Zardari but people of Pakistan elected Ms Bhutto and her father prime minister of Pakistan twice and her husband President. Third re-launching of Benazir Bhutto (and now Zardari) had a Shia dimension too? The Americanized Shia President Zardari is behaving and dressing like Iranian leaders? Benazir and Zardari’s links with Zionist lobby and complete reliance on foreign actors, Benazir Bhutto’s murder investigation by UN is a clear sign of mistrust on Pakistani institutions?

    PPP was formed in the house of a Shia, Dr Mubshar Hassan, Bhutto’s finance minister according to reports. MQM also formed and overly represented in leadership by the mostly leftist Shias like John Elia, Raees Emrovhee, Shanshaha Hussain, Abbas Kumeli, Haider Abbas Rizivi and many others. Both the above parties are in complete patronage of India and US! Senator Mushahid Husain the brain of former ruling party PMLQ, Faisal Salah Hayat former interior minister, SM Zafar former law minister, lawyer Naeem Bukhari (reportedly used by Gen Mushraf to sack CJP Iftikhar Chaudhry), Dr Shireen Mazari, spokesperson of Imran Khan’s PTI, Prof Mehdi Hassan, Naseem Zahra, Hasan Askri Rizvi also come from Shia background.

    Does Sunnis in Iran have same high positions, liberties, and freedoms as Shias in Pakistan ? For example many known and reported Shias of Pakistan are in high political and government positions doing their jobs without any problems. President Asif Zardari, Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani, Information Minster Sherry Rehman, Governor State Bank Saleem Raza, Secretary Defence Athar Ali, DG ISPR Maj Gen Athar Abbas brother of renowned journalists Azhar Abbas (Former GEO TV- DAWN TV), Mazhar Abbas (AFP), and Zafar Abbas (BBC). Former Pakistan ’s ambassador to US Abida Hussain her daughter newly elected Senator Kalsum Imam, Senator Faisal Raza Abidi, Faisal Sabzwari, Sind Chief Minister, deputy speaker Sind Assembly Shela Raza PPP and many others. So when, ‘Khurshid Kasuri former Foreign Minister said to the Iranian Foreign Minister, "Pakistani Shias are not like Sunnis in Iran". He meant the above?

    Since 2001, US policy is quite focused on Shias and Sunnis. On the one hand US siding with Shias in Iraq and Afghanistan against Sunnis but on the other hand supporting Sunnis in Middle East against Shia Hezbollah and Syria ? Interestingly the wizard of the US policy on Shias and Sunnis is Vali Nasar son of Husain Nasr who was close to Shah of Iran. He is Professor at the US Naval Postgraduate School, an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He tells people what they want to hear not what they should know!

    Vali Nasr wrote in Foreign Affairs, July/August 2006, ‘When the Shiites Rise’, “By toppling Saddam Hussein, the Bush administration has liberated and empowered Iraq's Shiite majority and has helped launch a broad Shiite revival that will upset the sectarian balance in Iraq and the Middle East for years to come. This development is rattling some Sunni Arab governments, but for Washington , it could be a chance to build bridges with the region's Shiites, especially in Iran ”.
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    continued


    The great game of weakening Pakistan was going on for few years but now it has taken pace and no one seems to be bothered? Main features of the game are (1) Humiliation of Pakistan armed forces, (2) Taking over nuclear assets (3) Installing minority group people in powerful positions, which Zardari is already doing. (4) Use minority groups as collaborators? It did not fully work in Iraq but did bring chaos and destruction?

    Zafar Hashmi in an article published on 11th January 2005 titled, ‘The Shia Strategy in Iraq and Pakistan ’ wrote, “The two most repressive governments from the Shia point of view i.e. the government of Taleban and the regime of Saddam Hussein have disappeared. He wrote, ‘The only way to prevent suicide bombings is through intelligence gathering of the enemy or in other words we have to infiltrate SSP and keep an eye on their activities. If some of our brothers join and infiltrated SSP or LJ then we can keep track of their activities and plans. Any intelligence that we gather on SSP or LJ can be simply passed to the Pakistani security agencies who are closely working with the Americans. In this way we neither have to kill, attack, injure, or hurt anybody. All we are doing is passing the information and the rest is done by the agencies themselves.

    Its about time we drop the slogan of 'Death to America ' once and for all. We haven't achieved anything through such hollow slogans. We should stop living in this Utopia and face the reality. Its time we close the foreign front against America and concentrate on the local enemy whose sole aim is the destruction of the Shias in Pakistan . MailScanner has detected a possible fraud attempt from "www.iranian.com" claiming to be "http://www.iranian.com/Opinion/2005/January/Shia/index.html”

    Professor Vali Nasr, while addressing at a program on ‘America and Islam after Bush’, organised by The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life on December 8, 2008 said, ‘ Post-Saddam Iraq is the first Shia Arab state in history. That represents a major turning of the tide. What the U.S. did in Iraq was to showed a path to empowerment for the Shia, first through regime change and secondly through elections”.

    The News reported on 28th July 2008, that (mostly Shia), “The Hazaras in Quetta have been targeted repeatedly in the past. They suffered casualties which have been sectarian and ethnic biased”. It is reported that the Americans are using Shia Hazars as interpreters in Afghanistan against Taliban and that could have led to attacks on them?

    The use of Shias as collaborators is nothing new in the history. Both Mir Sadaiq who betrayed Tipu Sultan and Mir Jafar, who betrayed Sirajudullah in the Battle of Plassy in Bengal , supported and collaborated with British invaders were Shias. Fall of Bengal was the key to the 200 years British rule in India ? Historically, “Vengeful Shiites volunteered help to the Mongols in Mosul and other places along their march. The caliph’s vizier, or chief minister, was himself a Shiite of uncertain loyalty. Islamic opinion afterward held that the vizier, al-Alkamzi, vilely betrayed the caliph and conspired with the Mongols; an exhortation in Muslim school books used to say, “Let him be cursed of God who curses not al-Alkamzi.” As fighting began, Hulagu, acknowledging the importance of Shiite support, prudently posted guard detachments of a hundred Mongol horsemen at the most sacred Shiite shrines in Najef and Karbala wrote Ian Frazier April 25, 2005 in The New Yorker.

    “ Iran may be bombastic but Pakistan has the Bomb”, wrote Douglas Bloomfield in The Jerusalem Post on 3rd September 2008, “ Iran may boast of great strides in its pursuit of nuclear, missile and satellite technology, but analysts say its progress is no match for its overblown rhetoric. But Pakistan doesn't need to boast. It already has a stockpile estimated at 60 or more nuclear warheads and North Korean ballistic missiles and US-made F-16s to deliver them.”

    No country should take sides on the basis of religious beliefs because Shias and Sunnis co-existed for hundred of years all required is to save themselves from abuse and keep their house in order ? No doubt there would be minor religious tensions but internationalising them is like asking for trouble? What is happening in Kuram Agency now or in the past, Iranians have no control over it and they have their own big problems too. When tensions between Catholics and Protestants were at the height in Northern Ireland , Britain did not ask Italian Catholic Pope to intervene or sign an international Catholic - Protestant peace deal? We never saw any protest outside British Embassy in Vatican ( Rome ) when Catholics and Protestant riots broke out in Northern Ireland ?
     
  5. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Why there should be any arbitration it's bi lateral dispute and should be sorted out in that way only. Asking for outside help clearly shows the weakness from other side.
     
  6. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    now the things are coming out in open: Is it civil war?

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009\02\23\story_23-2-2009_pg7_4

    Waziristan Taliban set up shura to wage jihad

    * Pamphlets call for holy war against Obama, Zardari, Karzai

    By Haji Mujtaba

    MIRANSHAH: The Taliban in Waziristan announced forming a ‘Shura Ittehadul Mujahideen’ (Council of United Mujahideen) on Sunday to wage jihad ‘in an organised manner’.

    Pamphlets distributed in the Miranshah Bazaar and other areas of the agency headquarters said the forces led by Mullah Muhammad Omar and Osama Bin Laden were fighting against ‘infidels’ led by US President Barack Obama, Pakistani President Asif Zardari and Afghan President Hamid Karzai.

    They quoted verses of the holy Quran calling people to fight a holy war against ‘infidels’, who they said were killing innocent Muslims.

    The announcement was made by Taliban leaders Hafiz Gul Bahadur, who is the Taliban emir in North Waziristan, Baitullah Mehsud, the top Taliban commander in South Waziristan, and Maulvi Nazir, the chief of Taliban in Wana, who said they wanted to “stop the infidels from carrying out acts of barbarism against innocent people”.
     
  7. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Isn't this is un islamic?
    http://in.news.yahoo.com/139/20090223/874/twl-taliban-targets-uk-with-heroin-calls.html

    Taliban targets UK with heroin, calls it 'chemical-jihad'

    Mon, Feb 23 02:55 PM

    London, Feb. 23 (ANI): In a bid to wage a "chemical jihad" on Britain, the Taliban has planned to flood the UK streets with heroin. And to carry their terrifying mission forward, they are using hate-filled Muslim gangs as heroin dealers.

    Pakistan and Afghanistan based Al-Qaida and Taliban warlords have directed their dealers a task to sell a six billion pounds of heroin to non-Muslims.

    The Taliban's two-faced chemical attack is not only aimed at killing many with heroin, but also to collect massive sums to sponsor future terror attacks.

    The Daily Star quoted a senior security source, as saying, "the Afghan poppy fields are probably the biggest financial contributor to al-Qaida and the Taliban. The UK's heroin trade is increasing at an alarming rate and most of the cash helps arm terrorists with bombs and guns."

    Already, the US has been targeted by the Taliban in a similar evil scheme, which mirrors a terror plot in the new James Bond novel 'Devil May Care'.

    Taliban linked drug peddler Haji Baz Mohammed generated 17 billion pounds by pouring heroin into North America between 1990 and 2005.

    He told a US court, "Selling heroin was a jihad because they were taking Americans' money and the heroin was killing them".

    With a whopping thirty tonnes of heroin smuggled into Britain every year, the UK undoubtedly is the top target of the fanatics.

    Heroin is grown in the Afghan badlands and bought for 1,500 pounds per kilo in Pakistan. It's finally sold on Britain's streets between 30 to 50 pounds per gram.

    Often, the Asian gangs operating in South London, Luton, Preston, Manchester, Leeds, Oldham, Birmingham and Bradford sell heroin in the backs of cabs or over kebab shop counters.

    One such cabdriver revealed a lot about the spreading heroin attack in the UK.

    "Poppy fields between Pakistan and Afghanistan. The big bosses have Taliban and al-Qaida connections and we're often told only to deal it to non-Muslims. They call it -chemical jihad and hope to ruin lives while -getting massive payouts at the same time.

    The drug gangs have already spread misery in thousands of lives. Greg Yates is one of 280,000 addicts in the UK. Huddled up and shaking on a bridge near Luton rail station, the 42-year-old former mechanic told us his 80 pounds-a-day habit had destroyed his life.

    "I can't function without the hits. I've lost my job, my home and my family. Heroin has killed me," he sobbed. (ANI)
    ANI
     
  8. ahmedsid

    ahmedsid Top Gun Senior Member

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    These ******** should Burn in hell for Ruining the lives of Innocents! My God what has the World Come to! Chemical Jihad! What next? anythings Next! Anythings Possible!
     
  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    That jihad has been going on for decades what was the reason in the past? greedy jihad?
     
  10. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    ok so what you have to say about this then: :)

    http://thenews.jang.com.pk/daily_detail.asp?id=163004

    Nizam-e-adl: what next for the Taliban?
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009
    Asad Munir

    Only time will tell whether the peace deal signed in Swat bears fruit and brings lasting peace to the valley. In this regard, however, it may be worthwhile to give readers a background into the origins of the Taliban in Pakistan. Also, it will be seen that the nizam-e-adl regulation agreed to now is similar to what Sufi Mohammad's Tehrik-e-Nifaz-e-Shariat Mohammadi (TNSM) had announced on its own way back in November 1994. Coincidentally – or perhaps not – that was also the month when the Taliban captured Kandahar.

    Mullah Omer started his Taliban movement with less than 50 madressah students and after the fall of Kandahar, thousands from Pakistani madressahs rushed to join the new force and by December 1994 he had a force of 12,000. A new phenomenon had been created in Pashtun society – that of madressah students and mullahs, with guns in their hands, ruling the Pashtuns. In Pashtun society no clear role is defined for religious functionaries in the social system. Government officials posted in these areas and the Maliks/Khans are considered leaders, who get legitimacy from the authority they exercise on behalf of the state, with religious functionaries given a limited role of dealing with rituals.

    Throughout the region's history, the religious leaders had wanted a greater role for themselves in decision-making and that is why the area often saw uprisings led by religious personalities. The latter had hold of the leadership as long as the war/jihad was on but once the conflict was over, it reverted to the Maliks and Khans. The present Talibanisation is not just a movement for enforcement of Sharia; the mullahs want power, authority and a defined role in decision making in the social system of Pashtun society.

    Events and political happenings in Afghanistan have always had some impact on NWFP in general and FATA in particular. The Durand line divided many tribes, and out of the seven tribal agencies, six have tribes on either side of the Durand line.

    As for Swat, it is neither a tribal area and nor does it border Afghanistan – so the question arises that why has it become a stronghold of extremists. Being a fertile area it always attracted invaders. Till the 10th century most of the population were followers of Buddhism and were very peaceful and docile people. In the 16th century the Yousafzai tribe captured the valley. The area was divided between various sub-tribes. There was no central system of administration and the tribes resolved their disputes themselves. Except for a few years of central rule, this system continued till 1917, after which different tribes elected a central leader and Swat emerged as an independent state. In 1926, the British accepted the state of Swat and the ruler was offered the title of Wali-e-Swat. He formed his own central administrative system with two types of courts functioning in the State. Courts headed by the religious scholars, known as qazi courts, and judicial courts headed by the area tehsildars. The qazi courts dealt with cases of divorce, inheritance and some other minor cases involving Sharia while all other disputes were referred to the tehsildar court. The appellate forum was that of a hakim, and a final appeal could be made to the wali. All this process took only one month. In those times the social problems were also not very complex so generally, the population was getting free and speedy justice.

    Dir and Bajaur were annexed by Pakistan in 1960 while Swat was merged in Pakistan in 1969. In 1975, these former independent states were declared as Provincially Administered Tribal Areas (PATA). These areas were then conferred the status of districts which meant that they also got district administration and police force. The judicial system, however, was based on jirgas and the executive authority of district magistrates. In 1992, on a petition of lawyers, the PATA regulations were abolished by the courts. However, surprisingly no alternative system was put as a replacement and this created a judicial void which created unrest in the general public.

    And it was this void which then created the seeds for the Nov 1994 uprising by the TNSM. This led to violence and the TNSM took control of six districts. New rules for traffic were introduced and all kinds of transport were forced to move on the right side of the road, the left being deemed un-Islamic.:D This resulted in numerous road accidents. Men were made to wear watches on the right hand. :D A sitting MPA of the PPP, the then ruling party, was killed. It took the law-enforcement agencies more than a month to dislodge the militants and to regain control of these areas.

    As for the TNSM, it was formed by Sufi Mohammad in 1988. He himself is a simple and peaceful man who does not preach violence except in the way of jihad against non- Muslims.:eek::confused: However, he does not have the leadership qualities and capabilities to control large movements. In the 1994 movement, besides the TNSM, many other elements also joined in and they included gangs of car-lifters, the timber mafia, farmers who had disputes with Khans, loan defaulters, smugglers and many other anti-social elements. Because of the violence, the then provincial government introduced the Nizam-e-Adal regulation in Malakand division in December 1994 and established qazi courts thereafter in 1995.

    Besides the TNSM factor, there are other actors in Swat. In the aftermath of 9/11, many of the foreigners who fled Afghanistan crossed over to Pakistan and took refuge in many parts of the country. Quite a few landed up in Swat and they were joined by others more recently after the recent military operation in Bajaur agency. Another factor that may have contributed is the landless farmers who, during Bhutto's era, took possession of lands which belonged to the Khans of the area -- Matta tehsil of Swat was the most affected in this regard.

    In case a focused strategy is evolved and pursued to a logical conclusion, the situation in both, FATA and Swat can be brought to normalcy if the following steps are taken: To develop consensus of civil society, all political parties, the media and all segments of society and the general public need to be educated that Talibanisation is a real and serious threat to the country and that if nothing is done to stop its advance then the anarchy will spread across the length and breadth of the country.

    As for Sufi Mohammad's demand for the establishment of an appellate court, this has already been done now. It should be noted however that the Adal act was already in place and so the establishment of an appellate court is not exactly a major milestone. One effect that the government will be hoping for is that Fazlullah may be sidelined or isolated to some extent because the people will see Sufi Mohammad as being the motivating force for the new system. At the same time, however, the governments should continue with targeted operations which should be conducted against the real terrorists through accurate intelligence. Once an area is cleared of militants, troops should remain stationed in it, so as to re-take control over all troubled areas in the district.

    The office of the DC/district magistrate should be restored with its original powers. This will allow the return of local administration. Compensation should be paid immediately for damage caused to public and private property. Special funds should be provided by the federal government for reconstructing all damaged and/or destroyed schools. An army garrison should be established in Swat and should have the size of a brigade. The headquarters of the Swat Scouts should be shifted from Warsak to Kanju. The scouts should be reorganized into five wings corps and also FC posts should be set up in all suitable areas. The strength of the police force should be increased and the Frontier Constabulary should be deployed wherever required.

    The local people who are against the present violence should be provided security. Their resistance against the militants can be maintained only if they believe that the government is serious in eliminating the Taliban. Also, the judicial system should be made more effective by taking suitable steps for making provision of justice both speedy and affordable.

    Negotiations with terrorists should be held on a two-point agenda: that they surrender and lay down their arms and that their leaders give an undertaking that they will not run a parallel administration and not interfere in the state's domain. If these conditions are accepted, and a monitoring system put in place confirms that they are being adhered to then a general amnesty to those not involved in heinous crimes could be considered.



    The writer is a former brigadier who served as chief of military intelligence and of the ISI for NWFP, FATA and the Northern Areas. He also commanded the Dir Scouts and raised and commanded the Swat Scouts. Email: [email protected]
     
  11. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    taliban are winning the fight against USA/NATO,Pakistan and afghanistan with pakistani surrender and NATO countries pulling out they will win in the end.
     
  12. ahmedsid

    ahmedsid Top Gun Senior Member

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    No My friend, For me, I believe Evil Never Triumphs, Yes it will have Successes but in the End only Good will win. its a Classic case of Good Vs Evil.

    Pakistan is making me nervous to be frank with all the damn reports of ceasefires etc etc coming out. I dont know whats in store.

    I say USA should not be allowed to be defeated in Afghanistan, Atleast for the sake of the Widows and Barbers!
     
  13. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Ahmed a taliban victory will change the whole southeastern neighborhood it has implications for India,pakistan,afghanistan,iran,china and central asia. The surrender by pakistan is already one victory for them.
     
  14. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://mypetjawa.mu.nu/archives/196499.php

    U.S. delays payment to Pakistan for 'fighting taliban'

    Pakistan hasn't received any 'aid money' from the US since last May because Pakistan does little in the way of fighting the taliban. The most recent example is how Pakistan surrended to the taliban in the SWAT region and agreed to implement shariah law.

    If Pakistan was receiving money from the US for fighting the taliban shouldn't the money tap been shut off back in 2002?

    From RTT News

    Pakistan has not received any money from the U.S. for the last nine months for rendering its military services to fight the Taliban and Al-Qaida in the restive tribal areas bordering Afghanistan, media reports say.

    Shaukat Tarin, the financial advisor to Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, said Thursday Pakistan's latest reimbursement bill of $1.35 billion for eliminating sanctuaries of Islamist insurgents conducting cross border raids on NATO forces in Afghanistan has been delayed.
     
  15. ahmedsid

    ahmedsid Top Gun Senior Member

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    Yes the Implications will be HUGE! I mean man, it will be like Apocalypse! Iran is already edgy, China is cunning, who knows what they are upto, Pakistan..... Well some guys tell that their President is nuts and Want the Military to overthrow him when he says the Taliban is a threat. As for India, We will be affected the most! God Forbid this ever happens.
     
  16. mehwish92

    mehwish92 Founding Member

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    This is definitely not a good sign for India. With the taliban now only a few hundred kilometres away from Indian territory, we have a lot to be worried about. It is in India's national interest to make sure that Pakistani gov't deals with these people and keeps them isolated.
     
  17. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Can you please tell me what is the difference between the terrorist organizations fighting inside India and Taliban. In my view they all are same.
     
  18. ahmedsid

    ahmedsid Top Gun Senior Member

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    there is no difference Nitesh, Both are Murderers, both kill Innocents and churn widows and orphans! Both are Evil, I see no Difference!
     
  19. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    my point was regarding we need to worry and all as Taliban is closer. I say we are fighting them only all along. So nothing new. Apart from politically recognition
     
  20. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2009-02-23-pakistan_N.htm

    Pakistan's slump creates security risks
    Posted 3h 7m ago

    By Paul Wiseman, USA TODAY
    FAISALABAD, Pakistan — The mob was hungry.

    Police had stopped hundreds of jobless Pakistanis from marching on the offices of the Faisalabad electric company, which they blamed for daily power outages. So the protesters went after the Treats bakery instead.

    They hurled rocks through the windows and stormed the place, beating anyone who tried to stop them, throwing the owner down a flight of stairs, looting the cash register and grabbing cookies, cakes and loaves of bread. "They put their anguish on us," store manager Muhammad Shafiq recalls. "Whatever food they found, they ate it."

    A month later, some of the windows at Treats haven't been repaired. Customers have returned, but many employees bear physical scars from the assault. Worst of all, Shafiq fears poverty is rising so fast in this city of 2 million people that conditions are ripe for another riot. "The unrest will continue," he predicts, "until the problems are solved."

    The lingering tensions in Faisalabad highlight how, in the early days of the Obama administration, the global economic crisis is making combustible countries such as Pakistan even more of a security risk to the United States and its troops abroad. The fear here, and in other parts of the Muslim world, is that unrest over soaring unemployment and food shortages could cause unpopular governments to collapse, resulting in more support for militant organizations such as al-Qaeda or the Taliban. "If the economy goes down, the militants benefit," says retired army lieutenant general Talat Masood, a prominent Pakistani political analyst. "If the economy was strong, many things would take care of themselves."{Seems like a ploy to get more money rather then doing something for economy}

    Even before the economic mess took hold, Pakistan was one of President Obama's biggest foreign-policy headaches.

    Despite receiving more than $11 billion in U.S. aid since the 9/11 terror attacks, its fragile government has been unable to stop Islamic extremists based on its soil from launching attacks in neighboring Afghanistan, where Obama announced plans last week to send an additional 17,000 U.S. troops to combat the growing Taliban insurgency. Pakistani militants also were responsible for November's assault on two hotels and other landmarks in Mumbai, India, which killed 170 people and raised the prospect of war between the two nuclear-armed rivals.

    Now, as the financial crisis chokes off trade and the flow of money to all corners of the world, "a lack of job opportunities may increase the incentives for many young Pakistani men to join militant groups," {Like till now they were coming from Mars}according to a recent report by the Center for American Progress, a Washington think tank. The report also warned that support for beleaguered Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari "could quickly erode."

    Obama has urged Pakistan to do more to eradicate "safe havens" for militants, and earlier this month he sent Richard Holbrooke, his new special envoy to the region, to Islamabad to press for action. Pakistani officials responded by asking for more military funding and urgent economic aid.:sAni_monkey:

    Pakistan's economy is slowing dramatically — from growth of 6% or more in recent years to just 0.6% in 2008 and a projected 2.4% in 2009, according to HSBC bank. And in a country with a youthful and rapidly growing population of 173 million, anything less than 3% growth amounts to a recession, Pakistani economist Mohsin Khan warns.

    Meanwhile, the government is so strapped for cash that it has fallen behind on payments to power companies, leading to the electrical blackouts that sparked the riots in Faisalabad and have chilled economic activity even further.

    The fallout from the blackouts was clear one recent day outside a factory in Faisalabad, where Muhammad Ashiq and some weary colleagues were waiting next to a pool of stagnant water, hoping the electricity would come back on. Since the outages started eating into the plant's working hours, Ashiq's previous wages of 6,000 Pakistani rupees a month — about $75 — have been cut in half.

    "It is terrible," Ashiq says. Half his reduced income goes to rent on his house, and the soaring cost of electricity takes up most of the rest.

    As food prices also rise, Ashiq has been getting his groceries on credit, but shopkeepers have begun cutting off cash-poor workers and the unemployed. He doesn't blame them: "They are broke," he says with a shrug. "We are broke."

    Poor feel squeeze

    The situation was similar 230 miles to the north in Rawalpindi, twin city to the capital Islamabad. Machinist Muhammad Shafiq (no relation to the store manager in Faisalabad) was sitting in the chilly darkness of his engine repair shop, waiting for the power to come back on. "We are doing nothing," said Shafiq, 62.

    Such stories help explain why, in a survey conducted last fall for the International Republican Institute (IRI), a U.S.-funded pro-democracy group, 73% of 3,500 Pakistani adults said their personal finances had deteriorated over the previous year, and 59% expected things to get worse.

    Asked to name the country's No. 1 problem, 58% picked inflation and 12% chose unemployment. Just 10% of those polled cited the recent wave of suicide bombings that has hit Pakistani cities as militant groups try to destabilize the government.

    Pakistan's poor have been particularly squeezed. Shoppers are paying 2½ times as much for wheat as they did in April 2007, according to the government. Palm oil, which is instrumental for cooking here, has tripled in cost during that time.

    The economic distress has hit hard in Faisalabad and the surrounding countryside. This is Pakistan's heartland and the center of its textile industry, which accounts for more than 60% of the country's exports. Workers in their traditional shalwar kameez— tunics worn over baggy pants — pour in from the countryside to take jobs weaving, sewing and dyeing fabrics.

    When work is plentiful, they send the bulk of their earnings back to their families. These days, work is scarce and getting scarcer. In the village of Fakharabad, unemployment is running at 80%, estimates Muhammad Anwar, a former factory manager who lost his job in December.

    People there are not accustomed to poverty: Muhammad Mushtaq, 21, had earned $100 a month — a decent salary here — for the previous four years. He lost his job in early January, and now his family is getting by on homegrown wheat and on credit from Fakharabad's general store.

    "We're starving to death," Mushtaq says. "How can I be happy?"

    Anwar sees even more problems ahead: "Because of the abrupt, increasing and severe joblessness, problems could emerge," he says. "Young guys can turn to crime."

    Anwar says that, because they follow a moderate form of Islam, Fakharabad villagers haven't been lured by Islamic militant groups. Even so, patience with the government in Islamabad is waning: "The entire economy is in crisis, and the government is sleeping," says Ejaz Ahmed, owner of a Faisalabad cotton-cycling plant.

    continued in next post.........................
     

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