NY Times Square bomb attempt

Discussion in 'China' started by ajtr, May 2, 2010.

  1. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    even if higly educated people with a good background & 'a decent life' are falling prey to these terrorists, we need to seriously think whats going on & how's its going on....
     
  2. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    Faisal Shahzad, the 30-year-old son of a retired air force officer who migrated from Pakistan and became a US citizen last year, has been charged with five counts of terrorism for trying to bomb Times Square on Saturday night.

    Pakistani and US investigators are now trying to piece together how and why the son of an affluent family could have turned his back on the prospect of a comfortable life in the United States to plot mass murder.

    US President Barack Obama was to meet his national security team Thursday, including Defence Secretary Robert Gates, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, top intelligence and counter-terrorism officials.

    Anne Patterson, the US ambassador to Islamabad, has consulted Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari and top cabinet ministers about the search for leads into the US investigation and will have further meetings in the coming days.

    The State Department spokesman said Washington has received a "full and complete pledge" of co-operation from Pakistan.

    "We will be exchanging information as the investigation is ongoing," Philip Crowly said. "Whatever leads are generated here in the United States ... we would fully expect Pakistan to follow up on."

    The Washington Post said the Obama administration was preparing to deliver to Pakistan a detailed request for urgent and specific assistance on the case by the end of the week.

    "When a formal request would be made, then proper investigations would be launched," Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik told reporters in comments broadcast by Express TV.

    The main question now is whether Shahzad acted alone, had outside help or was acting on behalf of a larger group either in Pakistan or elsewhere.

    "So far no concrete evidence has yet linked him to any group in Pakistan," a senior security official told AFP on condition of anonymity.

    The official said security agencies had been questioning his relatives and friends in Islamabad, Karachi and Pabbi, in northwest Pakistan close to Peshawar where Shahzad grew up in a middle-class family.

    The only group to claim responsibility for the plot is Pakistan's Taliban, which if found to be true, would mark a radical departure for a faction that concentrated its suicide and car bomb attacks at home.

    A US drone war has heavily targeted Taliban and al-Qaeda-linked leaders in Pakistan's tribal belt and the Pakistani Taliban leader, Hakimullah Mehsud, appeared in videos released this week threatening to attack US cities.

    "They're not going to sort of sit and welcome you (to) sort of eliminate them. They're going to fight back," Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi told CBS, saying the bomb plot could have been "retaliation".

    US newspapers citing American officials said there was growing evidence that the Pakistani Taliban helped to train Shahzad on how to make a bomb.

    The New York Times cited officials as saying that there were strong indications that Shahzad knew some members of the group and that they probably had a role in training him.

    According to the US criminal complaint, Shahzad admitted to receiving bomb-making training in Waziristan, a fortress of Taliban and al-Qaeda linked militants with increasingly overlapping associations and ideology.

    Pakistani militant groups, principally Tehreek-e-Taliban, but also Jaish-e-Mohammad and Lashkar-I-Jhangvi, have a presence in the area. It is also a hotbed of Afghan, Arab and central Asian fighters.

    But the Pakistani military, which has earned praise in the United States for a series of assaults on the Taliban, warned that it has yet to establish a link between the Pakistani-American and Waziristan.

    "Until and unless the link is established, it will be premature to say that he had gone there," army spokesman Athar Abbas said

    He also questioned the capability and reach of the Pakistani Taliban to strike within the United States.

    One theory touted by analysts is that Shahzad may have received limited training, but not been a full member of a militant faction.

    Officials have described him as co-operative during two days of questioning and the bomb was poorly rigged, which analysts have used to suggest that he had only basic technical proficiency and was amateur.
     
  3. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    Pakistan's Taliban claimed responsibility for the attempted bombing on Saturday and a U.S. official said investigators see "plausible links" between Pakistani-American Faisal Shahzad, the main accused, and the group but had not yet made a final determination.

    Reconstructing his path to Times Square may be impossible given the complexity of Pakistan's mosaic of militant groups, many of which are united only by hatred for America and its allies.

    For one, al Qaeda, which supports the Taliban, has changed since the September 11 attacks.

    It's no longer a tightly knit group, but rather an organization that inspires global jihad, and is in some ways even more dangerous, analysts say. Its ties to Pakistan's Taliban and other groups around the world have become more fluid.

    Gone are the days when CIA analysts could draw up clear charts connecting Osama bin Laden to his deputies, commanders, foot soldiers and affiliated groups, security experts say.

    "We can no longer determine the precise makeup. The traditional al Qaeda or Taliban no longer exist. There are vague ties between groups," said Kamran Bokhari, South Asia director at the STRATFOR global intelligence firm.

    Officials say Shahzad received bomb-making training in a militant camp in Pakistan, which once nurtured groups to fight Soviet occupation in Afghanistan, a strategy that critics say backfired and created a hydra-headed monster in Pakistan.

    Who may have hosted the former 30-year-old financial analyst from the U.S. state of Connecticut may never be known.

    Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), the Taliban Movement of Pakistan, is an umbrella group which may not have a central command after Pakistani army crackdowns and a punishing U.S. drone strike campaign.

    Speculation grew that someone new may be in control after the Taliban's particularly ruthless leader Hakimullah Mehsud was reported killed in a U.S. drone missile strike in January.

    WHO IS WHO?

    He re-appeared alive in videos posted on the Internet on Sunday and threatened suicide bombing attacks in major U.S. cities, signaling the group had become highly ambitious.

    "It is hard to know who Shahzad may have connected with. It could have been a smaller group within the TTP that decided to act independently," said political analyst Hasan Rizvi.

    U.S. prosecutors said Shahzad, the son of a retired Pakistani vice air marshal, had admitted to receiving bomb-making training in a Taliban and al Qaeda stronghold in Pakistan.

    In an example of the complexities, Qari Hussain, the Pakistani Taliban suicide bombing trainer, praised an attack in the United States, apparently referring to Times Square.

    On Wednesday night, an official Taliban spokesman said the group had no connection to the failed attack.

    The contradiction is not surprising given Pakistan's alphabet soup of militant groups, many believed to have al Qaeda links.

    There are Taliban -- both Afghan and Pakistani -- and Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), which is blamed for the 2008 attack in Mumbai which killed 166 people and has international networks.

    The list goes on.

    A senior security official said Shahzad may have links to the banned Jaish-e-Mohammad militant group through a friend, Muhammad Rehan, who was reportedly detained on Tuesday in Karachi.

    The group, also linked to the Taliban and al Qaeda, is dedicated to fighting Indian forces in Kashmir and has been designated a foreign terrorist organization by the United States.

    Unlike LeT, one of the more cohesive of the Pakistani groups, Jaish-e-Mohammad is believed to have splintered and gone rogue. It has been blamed for attacks inside Pakistan and tied to plots either in Britain or by British citizens inside Pakistan, including the murder of U.S. journalist Daniel Pearl in 2002.

    A new generation of militants with different priorities is appearing in Pakistan, analysts say, raising questions over whether old alliances between the military and its intelligence services and Islamists have frayed.

    In one possible sign of that, a former Pakistani intelligence officer turned campaigner for Islamist causes was found dead in last week, shot in the head and chest, security officials said.

    Khalid Khawaja was seized in March with another former colleague from the country's main ISI spy agency and a journalist. Militants later said they had kidnapped the three, whom they accused of spying.

    Pakistan media had reported they were kidnapped by a previously unknown militant group called the Asian Tigers.

    "Groups are emerging every day and you have not heard of them. I can only presume that intelligence agencies, American and Pakistanis, are equally...confused," said Taliban expert Ahmed Rashid.

    "Look at the re-appearance of Hakimullah. I mean he was presumed dead. That means that intelligence all around is very poor, not just Pakistani, but also American."
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    In many ways this Individual position can be an analogy to his homeland Pakistan. He was suffering economic hardship similar to his nation he like the nation refuses to work and suffer the pain of correcting this. His house was foreclosed similar to USA taking over the country of Pakistan and turning them into a client state ,he was educated had a master's degree and worked an entry level job similar to many pakistanis who are educated but no longer have an industrial or economic base to provide a living. He wanted the easy life like the Pakistani government wants the easy money from USA , he turned to terrorism for his failure like the government using terrorism as a bargaining chip on every issue that concerns Pakistan, he blamed USA for his troubles same as his nation. This individual is a perfect analogy for his nation/government he had the potential to do many thnigs but in the end he chose the terror path.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
    Singh, ajtr and Armand2REP like this.
  5. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    i agree what ever he did was bad, but it in no way can 'generalize a society', the thing is getting messy & the mess is growing bigger & bigger, you cannot generalize a whole society just because of acts of a frustrated individual who went bonkers, there are thousands of over seas Pakistanis who are working their way through thick & thin & are earning money for the survival just like the citizens of every third world country
     
  6. sunnyv

    sunnyv Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    I am worried - India is the trump card that these outfits to use as last resort .
    A dedicated attack on India will force- India to do some talking to Pakistan , and Pakistan likewise will ease pressure on Taliban and relocate its troops towards Indian side . Thats the aim of these outfits.

    I hope nothing such happens and next upcoming talks with Pak Gov go well , so that core issues could be resolved.
    A destabilized Pakistan is the worst thing that India could think off.
    Its the Americans who have created this trouble for themselves and Indians as well.
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    EG this was an educated person living in the a nation which offers the most opportunity in the world, he was from a high ranking family, let me ask you what makes and individual who has everything like this turn to terrorism? What you said is true there are many hard working pakistanis living abroad but one individual like this erases everything they do. Why does a young man a father,a husband from a wealthy family living in the land of milk and honey turn to terrorism?? I asked this question after the UK tube attack where they were born British citizens and they succesfully carried out their attack. There are a few reasons which i can thinkk of that makes an individual like this behave like this, he was raised by his parents to view terrorism and jihad as a good thing, he was raised in a society which view people who behave like this as martyrs, his family had similar views and raised him on a diet of hatred, he has a twisted view of the world , he views his actions as something acceptable in his religion , these are just a few things but I am not saying all Pakistanis living abroad are like him but there are enough pakistanis like him abroad to give the rest a bad name. I will give you an example of how all pakistanis suffer for the few like him, a pakistani friend recently told me when his family was arriving from Europe to USA at the airport they spent 3 hours being screened because of racial profiling and many bags were going to be arriving after further screening.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
  8. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Emo, maybe he studied textbooks which Zia created, bashing India and Indians. Education has a lot to do with all of this, but madrassa education of Pakistan. There are madrassa in India too, but minus the hate.
     
  9. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    he was living in United States of Ameica, what about the Pakistani born & brought up in UK, are they also reading the 'hate books'?

    they are misguided the mosques etc they are present in the foeign countries they get brain washed & do the things which destroy their very own lives & as i said before gone the days of Madrassa Educated Terrorists, they are moving towards a new breed
     
  10. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    One has to go back to 1947 and understand that this is a country that was created and based itself on religion, everything is viewed from an angle of Islam. Local/regional cultures have been suppressed infavour of a single Islamic and homogeneous society. So what is required is a new Pakistani identity where diversity is not stifled rather encouraged for a basis of a new identity. A critical study of History is necessary.
     
  11. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    (CNN) -- The ranking Republican on the House intelligence committee says "there probably is a strong link" between Times Square car bombing suspect Faisal Shahzad and the Taliban in Pakistan.

    Rep. Peter Hoekstra told CNN's American Morning on Thursday that he has drawn that conclusion from a number of sources.

    "If this is accurate, it would be a game-changer," Hoekstra said.

    "We're going to get much more aggressive and perhaps more creative in terms of how we gather intelligence to find the plots and find individuals to stop them," he said
    .

    He said his committee, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, will be getting an official briefing later Thursday.

    According to a law enforcement source with knowledge of Shahzad's questioning, the suspect made a practice run in Manhattan the day before he allegedly tried to blow up a car bomb in Times Square.

    Last Friday, Shahzad drove his white Isuzu from Connecticut through Times Square, where he staked out potential locations for the following night's planned attack, the source said. He then parked the Isuzu several blocks away from Times Square, though the precise location was unclear, and took a train back to Connecticut, the source said.

    Separately, authorities in Pakistan have rounded up a number of people for questioning, as U.S. law enforcement officials sought Wednesday to piece together Shahzad's actions and motivations.

    Iftikhar Mian, the father-in-law of the suspect, and Tauseef Ahmed, Shahzad's friend, were picked up in Karachi, Pakistan, on Tuesday, two intelligence officials said.

    An intelligence source said Wednesday that Muhammed Rehan, an associate of Shahzad, also was detained Tuesday.

    New details began to emerge on how Shahzad made his way to Times Square on Saturday night.

    With his recently acquired Pathfinder loaded with his makeshift explosives, Shahzad drove southbound along Manhattan's East River on FDR Drive to the 49th Street exit, the law enforcement source said.

    Shahzad then pulled over and reached into the Pathfinder's rear compartment where he attempted to set into motion the process needed to set off the homemade bomb, the source said.

    The source, who did not explain how Shahzad had attempted to set off the bomb, said he then took a number of turns and wound up entering Times Square by driving south down Seventh Avenue.

    It's unclear why Shahzad left the Pathfinder's engine running and hazard lights blinking.

    But because of an incredible goof, Shahzad couldn't use his escape car. He had accidentally left the keys to that vehicle in the Pathfinder that he thought was about to blow up, the source said.

    He apparently went to a train station, where he boarded a Metro North train back to Connecticut.

    Another law enforcement source told CNN that investigators found a train receipt used by Shahzad that is stamped about 7 p.m., a half hour after a witness notified authorities that the car in Times Square was filing with smoke.

    Sources say investigators believe he ran to catch the train that pulled out around 7 or 7:15 Saturday night.

    The source added that police investigators have discovered a surveillance video of Shahzad walking in Shubert Alley -- which runs between 44th and 45th streets just west of Broadway -- moments after witnesses saw the smoky SUV. In the video he is wearing a white baseball cap.

    In Islamabad, Pakistan, a senior Pakistani official said Wednesday that Shahzad's associate Rehan allegedly was instrumental in making possible a meeting between Shahzad and at least one senior Taliban official..

    The official told CNN that Rehan drove Shahzad on July 7 in a pickup truck to Peshawar, Pakistan. At some point, they headed to the Waziristan region, where they met with one or more senior Taliban leaders, the official said.

    Rehan is believed to have links to the militant group Jaish-e-Mohammed, which is close to al Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban, the official said.

    Several officials in Karachi said Rehan was picked up in Karachi's North Nazimabad district. They said others were taken into custody for questioning on Wednesday, but could not say how many, who they were or where they were seized.

    Meanwhile, efforts to determine what may have motivated the suspect continued. An official familiar with the investigation said Wednesday that Shahzad felt Islam was under attack.

    Any grudge Shahzad may have held against the United States appears to have developed recently, according to a senior U.S. official who is familiar with the investigation but not authorized to speak publicly.

    The investigation has found nothing to indicate that Shahzad had any long-standing grudge or anger toward the United States, the official said.

    "What we know is, the dynamic appeared to have changed in the last year," the official said.

    Investigators have not determined whether Shahzad had any training from Pakistani groups in anything, the source said.

    Additionally, the official suggested, detentions in Pakistan have been carried out to collect information and not because officials had reached any conclusions about their guilt or ties to any groups.

    "They are reaching out to people, bringing them in and doing their due diligence, but 'arrest' suggests a strong connection to the guy. While anything is possible, they haven't arrived at any conclusion," the source said.

    The official added that there was nothing to indicate the suspect is from an extremist family.

    Asked whether Shahzad was a "wannabe" who may be inflating his contacts, the source said, "It is going to take a little more time for the investigation to gel."

    Investigators have uncovered no evidence that the suspect had U.S.-based associates related to the plot, a federal law enforcement official said Wednesday.

    Investigators believe he handled the logistics himself, from purchasing the car to buying the materials for the bomb, the official said.

    Investigators are looking for any associates who may be overseas, the official said.

    The federal law enforcement official said Wednesday that Shahzad was still cooperating with the FBI and had waived his right to a lawyer. The official did not provide details about what Shahzad has been saying.

    Shahzad, 30, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Pakistan, was arrested late Monday at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport after boarding a flight bound for Dubai, United Arab Emirates. His final destination was to have been in Pakistan.

    When authorities tracked him down, Shahzad apparently was unsurprised. "Are you NYPD or FBI?" he asked. A Customs and Border Protection agent exposed his badge and said, "CBP," an administration official said.

    In Washington, State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley told reporters that "the Pakistanis are fully cooperating in the investigation. They recognize, as we do, that this is a shared responsibility and a shared threat."

    The charges paint him as a terrorist who received explosives training in Pakistan's volatile Waziristan region, where government forces have been working to root out Taliban militants. The Pakistani Taliban, a major militant group in the region, praised the suspect but denied any link to him.

    Shahzad has been charged with attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction, acts of terrorism transcending national boundaries, and three other counts in connection with the incident. If convicted, he faces up to life in prison.

    Shahzad admitted he drove a Nissan Pathfinder into Times Square on Saturday night and attempted to detonate the vehicle, which was packed with gasoline, propane tanks, fireworks and nonexplosive fertilizer, according to a complaint filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in New York.

    Court documents said that after receiving bomb-making training in Pakistan, Shahzad returned to the United States via a one-way plane ticket February 3.

    Upon his return, Shahzad qualified for secondary, or more detailed, screening under Customs and Border Protection criteria and was interviewed, the administration official said.

    He told immigration officials that he had been visiting his parents in Pakistan for the previous five months, according to the documents. He also told officials that his wife remained in Pakistan.

    CBP, following protocol, sent a report to the FBI and other intelligence agencies that included Shahzad's passenger information, the official said. Included in that report were phone numbers associated with his travel, when he bought his ticket and when he filed a customs form, the official said.

    The court documents show that Shahzad apparently maintained contact with people in Pakistan after returning to the United States.

    He received 12 phone calls from his country of birth in the days leading up to the incident -- five on the day he bought the Nissan Pathfinder used in the attempted attack. Those calls ceased three days before the failed bombing, the documents show.

    Authorities began focusing on Shahzad after tracing the sale of the Pathfinder to him.

    Shahzad's father, Bahar Ul Haq, is a retired senior officer in the Pakistani air force. The former air vice marshal lives in the Peshawar suburb of Hayatabad, according to Kafayat Ali, whose father is a first cousin of Shahzad's father.

    Shahzad lived at his father's house in Hayatabad when his father was posted in Peshawar, Ali said. Shahzad, his elder brother Amir and their two sisters moved with the father and received their education in the cities where the father was assigned.

    Ali said Shahzad's hometown is Mohib Banda, a village about 78 miles (124 kilometers) northwest of Islamabad. Ul Haq has farmland in Mohib Banda, and Shahzad and his siblings visited there during vacations and to attend relatives' weddings.

    Ali said Amir is a mechanical engineer living in Canada, where he is married and lives with his family. Both sisters are married; one is a doctor and the other is a housewife.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
  12. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Living in US for 10 years right? But yeah you are right. So what to do now, close down all mosques in Europe and US? This is not a solution. Infact critical elements from those mosques should be weeded out and eliminated.
     
  13. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    NY bomb suspect had links with Pak Taliban, Kashmir terror group: Pak

    KARACHI/BEIJING: Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik said on Thursday he thought it unlikely that a Pakistani-American arrested over a failed plot to bomb New York's Times Square had acted alone.

    Investigations in Pakistan have uncovered possible links between Faisal Shahzad, 30, the Pakistani Taliban and a Kashmiri Islamist group, officials and news reports said.

    "According to the available information he says it was his individual act," Malik told Reuters in an interview during a visit to Beijing. "I would not tend to believe that."

    Pakistani security officials told Reuters that Shahzad, who is suspected of driving an explosives-laden SUV into Times Square on Saturday, was close to Jaish-e-Mohammad, a group fighting Indian forces in the disputed territory of Kashmir and which also has ties to al Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban.

    "The people who have been picked up do have links to Jaish and have also been in touch with Shahzad during his visits here," a Pakistani security official in Karachi told Reuters.

    The official was referring to Mohammad Rehan, a friend of Shahzad, who was detained on Tuesday after leaving the Bat'ha Mosque in Karachi. Other associates, including Shahzad's father-in-law, have also been detained in Karachi, according to CNN.

    The mosque is said to have links to Jaish and neighbours tell of visits by its leaders.

    US investigators are also taking a "hard look" at possible ties between Shahzad and the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), the Taliban Movement of Pakistan, a US official said Wednesday.

    "It is a known fact that the mosque (in Karachi) has been a recruiting ground for Jaish and many people have been sent to the tribal areas (home to the TTP) for training," a second Pakistani security official told Reuters.

    The official said several men recruited through the mosque had fought against the military during recent offensives against the TTP.

    "It may not be a surprise if the people associated with the mosque, or those who come here for recruitment, are linked with the TTP," he said.


    The US official agreed. "TTP is entirely plausible but we're not ruling out other groups," the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

    If confirmed that the Taliban in Pakistan sponsored the attempted bombing in New York, as it claimed over the weekend, it would be the group's first attack on US soil.

    PARENTS WHEREABOUTS UNKNOWN The United States had asked Pakistan for help in investigating the failed bomb plot, the Washington Post reported on Thursday, and is preparing a detailed request for urgent and specific assistance to be presented by the end of the week.

    Pakistan was ready to give them "every help, full support" to bring the culprits to justice, Malik said.

    The United States has also asked to interview Shahzad's parents, the Post reported, quoting a Pakistani official who said their whereabouts are still unknown.

    Shahzad was arrested on Monday night after he was removed from an Emirates plane at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport that was about to depart for Dubai. He had been on his way back to Pakistan.


    Shahzad, who was born in Pakistan and became a US citizen last year, has been charged with attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction and trying to kill and maim people within the United States as well as other counts.

    US prosecutors said Shahzad, the son of a retired Pakistani vice air marshal, had admitted to receiving bomb-making training in a Taliban and al Qaeda stronghold in Pakistan. A law enforcement source said investigators believed the Pakistani Taliban financed that training.

    Shahzad waived his right to an initial court appearance within 48 hours of his arrest and other US constitutional rights, a US official and sources said. He faces life in prison if convicted of the charges against him, unless he negotiates a lesser sentence in exchange for cooperation.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...hmir-terror-group-Pak/articleshow/5899003.cms
     
  14. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    I never said 'close all mosques' emo6
     
  15. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    An attack will force India to wage a full scale war. It is rather unfortunate that we have increased our threshold of pain.

    The aim of these outfits is to usurp power.

     
  16. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    faisal shezad is of same breed as that of omar sheikh,prof.hafiz saeed,osama bin laden,al-zawahiri,mohd.Atta and his 9/11 gang,daud gilani aka david headley, Tahawwur Hussain Rana, Ramzi Ahmed Yousef and many others are the big fish these were all highly educated and were from rich background and the main thing being all had relationship with pakistani army and ISI.The madarssa educated poor cadre like kasab are just foot soldiers.
     
  17. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Are we slow today ?

    He is from a liberal privileged background. His form of escapism was terrorism. He was not a hardened jihadi but he was disturbed enough by the circumstances to kill lives of hundreds of innocents and then escape back to Pakistan leaving behind his wife and children/

    Now, in which world would a person besieged by problems commit terrorism ? There has been a fundamental change in teh thinking of an average Pakistani. They can justify killings of others and sympathy and kinship with terrorists whom they also called the Soldiers' of God. THis is a malaise which is eating up into the Pakistani society and is clearly as a result of Pakistani ideology being essentially Islamic ideology.
     
  18. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Forget the mosques... close all the Madrasas and make them public schools with a liberal curriculum.
     
  19. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Like the ones in which Faisal Shahzad studied ? Atleast they will turn out to be dumb terrorists like him..
     
  20. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    dont close mosque but sure keep tab on mullahs who gives inflammatory speeches during juma prayers.That one reason of brain washing masses.
     

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