NY Times Square bomb attempt

Discussion in 'China' started by ajtr, May 2, 2010.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    This seems like an excuse prepared for him if he got caught to coveniently blame it on something US was doing so he can kill innocent Americans. He should have just joined the taliban while he was there being upset as he was about the drone attacks; drone attacks are ok with the pakistani government so even that excuse will not cut it.

    http://www.welt.de/international/article3989333/Facts-on-U-S-drone-attacks-in-Pakistan.html

    The United States has shrugged off Pakistani protests. It says the missile strikes are carried out under an agreement with Islamabad which allows Pakistani leaders to decry the attacks in public. U.S. officials said last month the United States had given Pakistan data on militants in the Afghan border area gathered by surveillance drones in Pakistani airspace under an agreement with Pakistan
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
  2. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Lol if pakistani army and govt. says that we are doing drone attacks then they will be skinned alive first by their public hence you get a lot of orchestrated shouting from the roof tops that america is doing drone attacks against pakistani govt.'s will.the situation is same as like india is stealing our waters in chenab and indus just to blame their own incompetence of water mismanagement on india.And as Christine fair said that pakistanis are congenial liars,they repeat a lie so many times so that with passage of time their own dumb public considers it as truth and started believing in conspiracy theories.like the drone attacks,indus water stealing etc.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
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  3. thakur_ritesh

    thakur_ritesh Administrator Administrator

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    With these elites taking to terror and with the amount of venom spewed by certain Pakistanis living overseas on Pakistani forums one is forced to wonder how many of these are in fact an active or a passive part of all these terror groups and were these proclaimed elite terrorists ever a part of these forums whom we might have then thought as liberal modern thinkers, it just keeps getting so murky by the day!
     
  4. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    Pakistan has institutionalized TERROR as a way of life. There are so many of these nut-cases in Pakistan that the country itself is becoming a major threat to the whole western world.

    The only way to fight this menace is to profile everyone from has travelled to Pakistan regardless of what their passport says. Converts should be given very careful attention.
     
  5. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    This is nothing new.They somehow find ways to wriggle out by blaming thier incompetence on others.This is in every pakistanis genes. This is what Former pakistani captain Younis khan has to say when most ofthe countries team stop visiting pakistan for fear of being attacked like the srilankan team was attacked.

    so drone attacks as reason for bombing NYC is just the smoke screen.The main reason is that our Dear papa's lad was financially broke and his house went for foreclosure by the bank.but he is not used to such things in pakistan where u take loan and get it written off by the bank using your contact Through NRO.pakistanis are never used to payback the loans hence in america when the 1st time this thing happened he got angry on america and try to blow up times square(to understand this psychology of pakistanis plz refer Younis khan's story above ).hence The above reason of drone attacks is the convienet way out but then drone attacks are done using pak govt's approval which pak army and govt never tells its people.Or that peopele even after knowing it try to hide under under conspiracy theories.coz its the easiest way out of ostrich like attitude of burying ones head in sand.Shezad is highly educated and he is from military family now he must be really knowing that usa is doing drone attacks witjh pakistan's approval but then he has to blame it on america like any other pakistani.
     
  6. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Ritesh,

    Conspiracies spuned by elites/media/govt/army in pakistan is to keep its majority of downtrodeen population's attention away from them on to the phony external threahs like hindu/jews/or USA.The fact is there were naver land reforms in pakistan and some 90 odd elite families/zamindars control the majority of pakistani land/resources/economy and power through army which in itself act like instutionalised zamindar(read about that in Ayesha Siddiqa Military Inc.: Inside Pakistan's Military Economy).Today the situation in pakistan is that its society is highly jihadizaised with every military family has one relative as terrorist.There are some modern thinkers but then they too wriggle out under majority pressure and blame some phony enemies.
     
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  7. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    It was always pakistan poor afghanistan is just victim of 30 years of usa/pak terror.

    I doubt if ever afghanistan was or will be client state of india.but this is usa think tank/reporter we are talking about with their 60 years master-slave relationship with pakistan they think any relation between countries is like client and master.But then they have to somehow whitewash their sin to blame it on india isn't it?

    but but but....good bad taliban was the brain child of usa to negotiate in order to hide the failure of their incompetent army in afghanistan.
     
  8. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Why Pakistan Produces Jihadists


    Monday night's arrest of Faisal Shahzad, a 30-year-old Pakistani-American accused of planting a car bomb in Times Square on Saturday, will undoubtedly stoke the usual debate about how best to keep America safe in the age of Islamic terrorism. But this should not deflect us from another, equally pressing, question. Why do Pakistan and the Pakistani diaspora churn out such a high proportion of the world's terrorists?

    Indonesia has more Muslims than Pakistan. Turkey is geographically closer to the troubles of the Middle East. The governments of Iran and Syria are immeasurably more hostile to America and the West. Yet it is Pakistan, or its diaspora, that produced the CIA shooter Mir Aimal Kasi; the 1993 World Trade Center bomber Ramzi Yousef (born in Kuwait to Pakistani parents); 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed; Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl's kidnapper, Omar Saeed Sheikh; and three of the four men behind the July 2005 train and bus bombings in London. The list of jihadists not from Pakistan themselves—but whose passage to jihadism passes through that country—is even longer. Among them are Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri, Mohamed Atta, shoe bomber Richard Reid, and John Walker Lindh, the so-called American Taliban. Over the past decade, Pakistani fingerprints have shown up on terrorist plots in, among other places, Germany, Denmark, Spain and the Netherlands. And this partial catalogue doesn't include India, which tends to bear the brunt of its western neighbor's love affair with violence.

    In attempting to explain why so many attacks—abortive and successful—can be traced back to a single country, analysts tend to dwell on the 1980s, when Pakistan acted as a staging ground for the successful American and Saudi-funded jihad against the Soviet Union in Afghanistan. But while the anti-Soviet campaign undoubtedly accelerated Pakistan's emergence as a jihadist haven, to truly understand the country it's important to go back further, to its creation.

    Pakistan was carved out of the Muslim-majority areas of British India in 1947, the world's first modern nation based solely on Islam. The country's name means "Land of the Pure." The capital city is Islamabad. The national flag carries the Islamic crescent and star. The cricket team wears green.

    From the start, the new country was touched by the messianic zeal of pan-Islamism. The Quranic scholar Muhammad Asad—an Austrian Jew born Leopold Weiss—became an early Pakistani ambassador to the United Nations. The Egyptian Said Ramadan, son-in-law of Muslim Brotherhood founder Hassan al-Banna, made Pakistan a second home of sorts and collaborated with Pakistan's leading Islamist ideologue, the Jamaat-e-Islami's Abul Ala Maududi. In 1949, Pakistan established the world's first transnational Islamic organization, the World Muslim Congress. Mohammad Amin al-Husayni, the virulently anti-Semitic grand mufti of Jerusalem, was appointed president.

    Through alternating periods of civilian and military rule, one thing about Pakistan has remained constant—the central place of Islam in national life. In the 1960s, Pakistan launched a war against India in an attempt to seize control of Kashmir, the country's only Muslim-majority province, one that most Pakistanis believe ought to be theirs by right.

    In the 1970s the Pakistani army carried out what Bangladeshis call a genocide in Bangladesh; non-Muslims suffered disproportionately. Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto boasted about creating an "Islamic bomb." (The father of Pakistan's nuclear program, A.Q. Khan, would later export nuclear technology to the revolutionary regime in Iran.) In the 1980s Pakistan welcomed Osama bin Laden, Ayman al-Zawahiri and the Palestinian theorist of global jihad Abdullah Azzam.

    In the 1990s, armed with expertise and confidence gained fighting the Soviets, the army's notorious Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) spawned the Taliban to take over Afghanistan, and a plethora of terrorist groups to challenge India in Kashmir. Even after 9/11, and despite about $18 billion of American aid, Pakistan has found it hard to reform its instincts.

    Pakistan's history of pan-Islamism does not mean that all Pakistanis, much less everyone of Pakistani origin, hold extremist views. But it does explain why a larger percentage of Pakistanis than, say, Indonesians or Tunisians, are likely to see the world through the narrow prism of their faith. The ISI's reluctance to dismantle the infrastructure of terrorism—training camps, a web of ultra-orthodox madrassas that preach violence, and terrorist groups such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba—ensure that Pakistan remains a magnet for any Muslim with a grudge against the world and the urge to do something violent about it.

    If Pakistan is to be reformed, then the goal must be to replace its political and cultural DNA. Pan-Islamism has to give way to old-fashioned nationalism. An expansionist foreign policy needs to be canned in favor of development for the impoverished masses. The grip of the army, and by extension the ISI, over national life will have to be weakened. The encouragement of local languages and cultures such as Punjabi and Sindhi can help create a broader identity, one not in conflict with the West. School curricula ought to be overhauled to inculcate a respect for non-Muslims.

    Needless to say, this will be a long haul. But it's the only way to ensure that the next time someone is accused of trying to blow up a car in a crowded place far away from home, the odds aren't that he'll somehow have a Pakistan connection.
     
  9. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    i don't have time to go through whole thread & i am out of touch these days, some one please tell me what exactly is meaning of 'attempted use of weapon of mass destruction'(read it yesterday in a respectable newspaper), are they talking about dirty bomb??
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    To kill more than 10 people may be called mass killing and hence mass destruction. By that definition, all the big bombs will classify as weapons of mass destruction.

    Just that the US govt is going to make sure that all sorts of charges possible are put on Faisal to make sure he doesnt come out of jail for the rest of his life.
     
  11. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    I right now have the front page of 'The News',5th may, it says 'Shahzad has been charged with international terrorism & attempted use of weapon of mass destruction', blink blink

    plus


    'Court documents filed by the Justice Department on Tuesday evening called Shahzad's device "a weapon of mass destruction," and a sloppy-but-inventive IED wrapped with an SUV may have become just that.


    source
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
  12. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    i have to agree that most of the Pakistanis living abroad have more tendencies to become extremist, even i have noted that specially the Pakistanis from UK
     
  13. prahladh

    prahladh Respected Member

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    You read my mind. I asked my brother to shift room after he noticed some of his room-mates (pakistanis) in U.K had bin-laden & related pics in their cells. He didn't expect that from them since they behaved like typical students. Gotta be very careful now-a-days
     
  14. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    This line caught my eye:

    http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect...ternational/fear-grips-pakistaniamericans-550

     
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  15. DaRk WaVe

    DaRk WaVe Regular Member

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    For most of the Pakistanis born & brought up in UK, their parents really give a damn about them & many of them turn out to be 'tableegis' but with all the potential in the world to do something stupid if they ever got a chance, proper extremists, people who don't even keep a television in their rooms just because it was declared 'haram' by a Mullah whom they follow blindly can fall prey to any one without any problem as long as some one is using religion to misguide their already retarded minds


    exactly
     
  16. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    some nice spin work going on from pakistan

    Pakistani militants 'planning wave of strikes on US'



    NightWatch

    For the Night of 4 May 2010

     
  17. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Nothing new that india doesn't know

    NY bomb plot raises questions about Pak military-terror nexus


    WASHINGTON: Long in thrall of the Pakistani military for geo-political reasons, Washington is finally starting to examine that institution's ties to terrorism following the discovery that failed Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad also belongs to an elite 'fauji'/diplomatic family as did alleged Mumbai carnage facilitators David Headley and Tawassur Rana.

    Initial reports describe Shahzad as the son of Air Vice Marshal (retd) Baharul Haq, who retired from the Pakistan Air Force in early 90's and later was a senior official in the country's Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). His uncle Maj. Gen. Tajul Haq, is reported to have been inspector general of the Frontier Corps.

    If the family ties are confirmed, analysts says it follows the pattern of mediocre sons from some elite Pakistani families becoming terrorists, a development far removed from the clichéd image of indigent madrassa recruits that is often associated with Pakistani terrorism.

    Headley-Gilani's father was a civil service diplomat, while Rana came from a family of army officers, including brothers serving in the military. Both went to the elite Hasan Abdal Cadet College before migrating to the west.

    Ahmad Rashid, among the foremost experts on extremism in the region, said it was "truly extraordinary, from a Pakistani perspective, is that he (Shahzad) belongs to this country's true blue-blooded establishment" and warned that "US-Pakistan relations are likely to sour dramatically for the Pakistanis" if Shahzad is found to have been trained in bomb-making in Pakistan's badlands it has avoided cracking down on.

    "The fact that his father belonged to the country's ruling elite helped provide a cover that made it virtually impossible to detect his terrorist activities. The fact that he was determined to set off a bomb in the US rather than in Pakistan or in Afghanistan where Westerners have been recruited as suicide bombers makes him Pakistan's first global jihadist," Rashid explained in a commentary.

    In fact, there is now an ongoing re-examination of terrorists' profile in Washington, considering the terrorist groups' avowed intention of using recruits who can easily enter countries like the US and meld into western society. They are more likely to be wearing Dockers than dishdasha, and speak fluent English besides their native language. Some law-makers are talking of tightening immigration, visa, and citizenship rules to stop the infiltration of such 'elite' terrorists.

    While US law-enforcement authorities allowed themselves a brief moment of self-congratulation at the speed with which they zeroed in on Faisal Shahzad, the cold light of the morning has raised deeper questions about his entry to the U.S as a student, his assimilation or otherwise into American society, the process by which he acquired citizenship, and at what point did a 30-year old family man, a father of two infants, turn into a terrorist. Analysts have also noted that he earned an engineering degree (as did Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and Mohammed Atta) before going in for an MBA.

    Some of the answers to these questions lie in Pakistan, where, Shahzad has admitted in initial questioning, he received militant training. U.S investigators are now looking into whether he has ties to terrorist groups such as Tehreek-e-Taliban, Lashkar-e-Taiba, or Jaish-E-Mohammed, or whether he acted alone and was a lone wolf as he claims.

    Of particular interest is his transit through Dubai, which was also Mumbai massacre caser David Headley transit point. The fact that Shahzad gave his nationality as Kashmiri in his latest passport is also being scrutinized for whether he has ties with groups operating there.

    The Shahzad episode has also brought immense scrutiny on the Pakistani establishment, after a brief honeymoon period in which the Obama administration rhapsodized over its sterling role against terrorism. Leading analysts are asking hard questions, including whether the Pakistani military, the real power fronted by a dummy civilian government, has genuinely given up use of terrorism as covert policy given its decades-long neuroses about India.

    "The Pakistani government is still obsessed with the idea of an Indian domination of the region...That's what makes me skeptical that there's been a true strategic revolution in Pakistan... There are still people who believe that there are good terrorists and bad terrorists, and some you can work with to further Pakistan's goals," Newsweek's Fareed Zakaria said on CNN even as the Pakistani fan club in Washington DC kept a discreet silence.

    Describing Pakistan as an "epicenter of Islamic terrorism," an expression the Obama administration has avoided using of late, Zakaria said "it's worth noting that even the terrorism that's often attributed to the war in Afghanistan tends to come out of Pakistan, to be planned by Pakistanis, to be funded from Pakistan or in some other way to be traced to Pakistan," Pakistan's connection with terrorist groups, he said, goes back decades and has often been encouraged by that nation's military for strategic reasons.

    That's something successive recent US administrations have been leery of raising publicly given Washington's dependence on Islamabad to conduct the war not only in Afghanistan, but within Pakistan itself. But the near tragedy in Times Square is likely to jolt the Obama administration from its credulous thrall of what many analysts say is Pakistan's dodgy and selective fight against terrorism.
     
  18. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Pakistan receives $468 million from US security fund



     
  19. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Wow pakistani goes great length to generate conspiracies Following video is in urdu th e anchor tries to spin web of conspiracies from ajmal kasab sentencing to general kiyani's visit to usa for strategic dialog and NYC botched up bombimg.The bottom line the anchor draws is that india in order to spoil usa-pakistan friendship is maligning pakistan's name through its lobby in usa by relating NYC bombing to pakistan.Must watch video great spin work. =heheh

    Aaj kamran khan ke saath 4th may 2010 - part 2

     
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  20. sob

    sob Moderator Moderator

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    What a perfect Oxymoron : Disgruntled Jihadis: The fig leaf of Freedom Fighters is blown away once again by a Senior Pakistani Army officer.
     

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