Nuclear Power in India

Discussion in 'Economy & Infrastructure' started by nitesh, Feb 22, 2009.

  1. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    True, but I think it'd be wrong to leverage that yaar !!! We need the money as much as they need the services... and, possibly if we didnt do it, they might net some east europeans to do it for them... I hear eastern europe is up and coming in the IT outsourcing thing...
     
  2. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    Anyways, lets keep it on topic... France Nuclear Deal with India

    I'll open another thread in the Economics section to discuss our Service sector industries and their threats and opportunities...
     
  3. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    Saran: India finalising sites for U.S.-origin nuclear reactors

    NEW DELHI: The Union Government is finalising locations for $150-billion U.S. nuclear power reactors promised to Washington during negotiations for ending India’s isolation from global nuclear commerce, Prime Minister’s Special Envoy Shyam Saran said in Washington on Monday.

    Speaking at the Brookings Institution, Mr. Saran said fewer American restrictions on transfer of cutting-edge technology would result in U.S. companies bagging a chunk of Indian defence hardware purchases over the next decade.

    Mr. Saran declared himself favourable to the idea of India signing the Fissile Missile Cut-Off Treaty as well as joining the U.S.-led Proliferation Security Initiative, which has been criticised as infringing international laws of the sea. However, he indicated that differences over the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty would remain until it was linked to the goal of nuclear disarmament.

    Referring to the Indian promise on 10,000-MWe U.S. nuclear power reactors, the former Foreign Secretary did not anticipate any opposition from the State governments to the setting up of nuclear plants. For, “this is a privilege most States aspire to.” The government completed its internal discussions on the international nuclear liability convention, which the U.S. nuclear companies have been insisting on India signing as a precursor to their entry into the country.

    With the general elections having been announced and fresh decision-making having stopped with the model code of conduct in force, he counselled the U.S. companies to utilise the interregnum by preparing the ground to enter into partnerships with Indian companies.

    Mr. Saran reiterated India’s right to reprocess U.S.-origin spent fuel, and indicated that the Obama administration was ready to engage with India at an early date.

    He referred to the “lingering Indian doubts about the reliability of the U.S. supplies” and called upon Washington to dispel them. Simultaneously both sides needed to work together to find a mutually acceptable solution, which would take care of the U.S. legal requirements of end-use monitoring of transferred defence articles and also meet Indian sensitivities.


    The Hindu : Front Page : Saran: India finalising sites for U.S.-origin nuclear reactors
     
  4. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    US origin nuclear reactors ???

    No tendering and bidding process ???
     
  5. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Nope it is appease all. US, France, Russia. Besides who else has the technology to build them?
     
  6. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=aAz2da6SiMOY&refer=india

     
  7. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...items-ban-India-to-US/articleshow/4308357.cms

    India says lift ban on dual use items; dangles $270 bn business
    24 Mar 2009, 0943 hrs IST, IANS

    WASHINGTON: India has asked the US to lift the ban on sale of dual use items, noting that besides $150 billion business for American nuclear power reactors it could lead to another $120 billion in defence sales.

    "With the opening up of nuclear commerce with India, there is a need now to review and remove these unnecessary restrictions on international trade with dual use item and technology," Prime Minister's Special Envoy on nuclear issues Shyam Saran said Monday.

    "As India's economy matures and its industry moves into higher-end manufacturing, the demand for high technology goods and services is destined for a major boost," he said in a keynote speech at the Brookings, a Washington think tank on "Indo-US civil nuclear agreement: Expectations and Consequences".

    "And the US, of course, remains preferred source of such goods and services," he said expressing the hope that "the so-called Entity List, which still prohibits sale of US technology and services to a number of Indian high-tech companies, will be scrapped sooner than later.

    Hit by the global economic crisis India's growth rate is likely to go down 2 or 3 percentage points in the next couple of years, but energy and defence will remain at the top of India's national agenda, Saran said.

    "This should encourage the US to look at India as a welcome source of demand for its goods and services, even as the global economy contracts," he said.

    Saran, who played a key role in negotiating the nuclear deal, said India's offer to buy upto 10,000 megawatts of US nuclear power reactors "may translate into $150 billion worth of projects, with significant business opportunities and potential collaboration for both Indian and US companies."

    If India maintains its current level of defence spending to achieve its medium and long-term goals of force upgradation, then a growing part of the expected 10 year plan of $120 billion could be reoriented towards the US supplies, he said.

    "This will require the US to overcome lingering Indian doubts about the reliability of US supplies," Saran said suggesting that the two countries "work together to find a mutually acceptable solution which will take care of US legal requirements about end use monitoring of transferred defence articles and also meet our sensitivities."

    Saran said he was certain "we will be able to do so quickly given our past experience and also given the interest both our countries have in strengthening this relationship."


    Check the list guys:
    Entity list

    on page 9 and 10
     
  8. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123840567405469283.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

    Areva to Start Operations at 8 New Factories in India


    By SUNIL RAGHU

    BARODA, India -- The transmission and distribution division of French nuclear engineering group Areva S.A. said Monday it will start operations at eight new factories in India this week as it tries to capitalize on rising demand for energy in the world's second-fastest growing major economy.

    Areva has invested nearly 9.5 billion rupees ($188.1 million) to build the plants for producing transformers and other power equipment. Four of the plants began operations earlier in the day at Baroda, in the western state of Gujarat. The remainder are in the southern states of Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

    "These are exciting times for us in India as energy demand in Asia is growing," Philippe Guillemot, chairman and chief executive of Areva T&D, told reporters. The new plants in India will add more than 1,500 direct jobs over the next four years, he said.

    Areva T&D currently employs more than 4,600 workers at 16 factories in India.

    Economic expansion and the construction of new factories and residential apartments have fueled demand for power in India. This has, however, led to long hours of blackouts as the country struggles to cope with the surge in demand.

    India's total installed generation capacity as on Jan. 31 was 147.46 gigawatt. In the 10-month period as of Jan. 31, peak demand was 109.81 GW, of which 94.63 GW was met, representing a shortage of 13.8%.

    India aims to add generation capacity of almost 80,000 megawatts in the five years ending 2012, and wants to increase local power equipment manufacturing capacity to reduce dependence on imports. Areva and several other companies are expanding existing facilities or building new plants to cater to this growing market.

    Areva will make "significantly large" investments this year in its global operations, said Mr. Guillemot, adding it invested EUR300 million worldwide last year.

    "We are making investments in all geographies and have 22 ongoing capacity expansion projects," said Mr. Guillemot. "We are finishing a wave of investment that will help double our sales in the next few years."

    This year's investment will also go toward building two new manufacturing plants in China, he said.
    —Santanu Choudhury contributed to this article
     
  10. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...consignment-this-week/articleshow/4336089.cms

    India to get first imported nuke fuel consignment this week
    30 Mar 2009, 2040 hrs IST, PTI

    MUMBAI: India will receive this week the first consignment of natural uranium imported from French and Russian companies for its fuel-starved reactors after it got the NSG waiver for nuclear commerce in September last year.

    Around 60 tonnes of natural uranium from French company AREVA is expected to arrive at Nuclear Fuel Complex in Hyderabad in a day or two and around the same quantity from Russian company TVEL in a week's time, sources in the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) said on Monday.

    DAE signed a contract with AREVA for 300 tonnes of Uranium in December 2008 and with TVEL for 2000 tonnes in February this year at a cost of approximately Rs one crore per tonne, they added.

    With the arrival of uranium from these companies, the Nuclear Power Corporation, a public sector undertaking of DAE which is operating all its reactors below 40 per cent capacity, is expected to augment its total power to 1800 MW as against the current 1200 MW, the sources said.
     
  11. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=a7tTXNeiquK4&refer=india

    Larsen Wins 3.45 Billion Rupee Steam Generator Order (Update1)

    By Gaurav Singh

    March 30 (Bloomberg) -- Larsen & Toubro Ltd., India’s biggest engineering company, said it won a 3.45 billion rupee ($68 million) order from the Nuclear Power Corp. of India for four steam generators.

    The generators will run the 700-megawatt pressurized heavy water reactors being built by Nuclear Power, the state-run monopoly atomic power generator, at the Kakrapar Atomic Power Project in western Gujarat state, Larsen said in a statement.

    Larsen, which aims to achieve 30 percent sales growth this year ending tomorrow, needs orders from the power and atomic- energy companies to offset a slowdown in its parts-making business, President Operations J.P. Nayak said last month.

    India, the world’s second-fastest growing major economy, aims to add 78,700 megawatts generation capacity to plug peak- hour power shortages that touched almost 14 percent in the 10 months to January.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Gaurav Singh in New Delhi at [email protected].
    Last Updated: March 30, 2009 04:17 EDT
     
  12. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    good read

    what u guys think?

    http://www.livemint.com/2009/03/30222659/No-more-room-for-manoeuvre.html?h=B

    No more room for manoeuvre
    The outgoing Manmohan Singh government has squandered Indian influence, pandering to the US
    Bharat Karnad

    A new coalition government assuming power after the general election will be shocked to find that its foreign and military policy manoeuvring space has been severely shrunk by the outgoing Congress party-led regime. Recovering Indian independence and initiative will require, in the main, wriggling out of the tight corner the country has been pushed into by the civilian nuclear cooperation deal with the US. The nuclear deal which, according to ministry of external affairs insiders, took up fully 90% of Manmohan Singh’s time, proved beyond doubt the Prime Minister’s abysmal understanding of international power politics, which consists of sucking up to Washington at every turn. It explains why his government, for instance, refused to order a military response to 26/11. Singh apparently feared that doing so would lead Pakistan to redeploy its forces eastward, undermine the US strategy on Afghanistan-Pakistan and upset the US. But given that the US perceives its interests to be global, not upsetting Washington is a recipe for immobilizing Indian foreign and military policy.
    Disregarding a hallowed foreign policy principle from Indira Gandhi’s time of abjuring treaties with the potential to hurt the country’s nuclear programme and limit its weapon options, Singh signed the nuclear deal. The 18 July 2005 joint statement and the subsequent enabling US law, the Henry J Hyde United States-India Atomic Energy Cooperation Act of 2006, make amply clear the American intention to use the bilateral agreements as legal device to shoehorn the heretofore untrammelled Indian nuclear programme into the non-proliferation treaty net (refer deputy secretary of state James Steinberg’s 24 March talk at the Brookings Institution).
    Singh’s raison d’etre for the deal was his claim that it will help the country achieve “energy security”. A handful of us critics, including stalwart nuclear scientists P.K. Iyengar and A.N. Prasad, argued at length in our public writings why such and other claims were as fraudulent as Singh’s assertions in Parliament—which were belied by the safeguards agreement, that the deal secured for India recognition as a nuclear weapon state. Moreover, by agreeing in effect to forswear testing, he has ensured that the Indian deterrent will lack credibility because its most potent thermonuclear weapons are untested, unproven, and unreliable. Again, as forewarned, the deal that Singh hatched will be used by the radical non-proliferationists in the top posts in the Obama administration to squeeze this country. Instead of a free flow of civilian nuclear technology that the Prime Minister promised, India will be under the gun to sign the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT) and, heedless of the Chinese strategic build-up, to square up on nuclear armaments with a strategically irrelevant Pakistan, a country with a gross domestic product that is less than one quarter of the market cap of the Bombay Stock Exchange.
    Consider President Barack Obama’s appointees who will be shaping his India policy. At the steering wheel is the special adviser on non-proliferation at the White House, Robert J. Einhorn, a long-time opponent of India’s nuclear military programme, whose views are faithfully echoed by under secretary of state for non-proliferation and international security-designate Ellen O. Tauscher. Until she was picked for the job, Tauscher, a Democrat Congresswoman from California, was distinguished mainly by her toxic rants against nuclear India. Her priority, in line with Einhorn’s, is to compel India to sign the CTBT. “Trying to stop Tauscher from getting” her way, writes her friend Joseph Cirincione, who heads the non-proliferation-minded Ploughshares Fund, would be “like trying to stop Sherman from marching to Atlanta”. For those not familiar with the US Civil War lore, this reference is to the Union Army Gen. William T. Sherman’s “march to the sea” through the rebellious southern states that destroyed the economic heartland of the Confederacy, including its biggest city, Atlanta, which was torched.
    Tauscher, the “smash and burn” specialist who makes her predecessor John R. Bolton from the George W. Bush era look positively tame, will be at the diplomatic cutting edge, assisted by arms control expert Rose Gottmoeller, as assistant secretary of state for verification and compliance. Sharing a punitive mindset, these three will insist that India sign the CTBT, quickly agree to an FMCT and comply with every last provision in the Hyde Act, such as the “Obama Amendment”. This clause expressly prevents India from reasonably stockpiling uranium fuel for the lifetime of any imported reactors, rendering the reactors a dead investment and India hostage to behaviour that the US deems good. This Act also requires India to be in “congruence” with the US on Iran. If the current US attempts at a rapprochement with Tehran fail, this clause too will kick in. In short, the implementation of this Act in toto will entail a neutering of India.
    Do you reckon any new coalition government will have the gall to stand up to the US and its enforcers, Messrs Einhorn, Tauscher and Gotmoeller? Because Singh, should he return as prime minister, has shown he doesn’t.

    Bharat Karnad is a professor in national security studies at the Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi. Comments are welcome at [email protected]
     
  13. Triton

    Triton Founding Member

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    India's NFC receives first consignment of nuclear fuel from France

     
  14. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    A milestone reached

    http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/002200903311760.htm

    India's first nuclear power units complete 40 years tomorrow

    Mumbai (PTI): The inaugural units of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS), India's first nuclear power plant, will complete 40 years of successful generation of electricity from nuclear energy power on Wednesday.

    It was on April 1, 1969, that the two reactors of 160 MW each built by US power major General Electric (GE) on a turn-key basis at Tarapur, 120 km from here, were synchronised to the grid.

    The Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL), a public sector undertaking of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) will be felicitating those engineers who were responsible for synchronising the plants to the grid at a function in Tarapur tomorrow, TAPS officials said.

    The station has generated more than 77 billion units of electricity so far, and is supplying it to Maharashtra and Gujarat at a tariff of 94 paise per unit.

    "TAPS is a very successful project of the Department of Atomic Energy. The plant was set up under an agreement between the Governments of India and USA," Atomic Energy Commission Member Dr M R Srinivasan, who was then responsible for signing the contract with GE, told PTI.

    India was the first country to get nuclear energy in Asia besides erstwhile USSR as early as 1969, he said.
     
  15. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/uncategorized/india-links-ctbt-with-disarmament_100173358.html

    India links CTBT with disarmament
    March 30th, 2009 - 9:20 pm ICT by IANS

    New Delhi, March 30 (IANS) Ahead of a meeting between Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and US President Barack Obama in London, India Monday said it “won’t stand in the way” of Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) provided it “actively contributes to nuclear disarmament”.

    “We won’t stand in the way… but it should be a CTBT which actively contributes to nuclear disarmament,” Foreign Secretary Shivshankar Menon told reporters here when asked about India’s position on the signing of the CTBT - a key non-proliferation priority of the Obama administration.

    “We are not sure if the CTBT in its present form addresses our concerns,” Menon said. “Our position remains the same and has been consistent.”

    Manmohan Singh will meet Obama in London on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Thursday. The CTBT issue may figure in the discussions between the two leaders.

    India has refused to sign the CTBT on grounds that it tends to create a nuclear apartheid by dividing the world into nuclear weapon states and non-nuclear weapon states.

    Last week, India’s former foreign secretary Shyam Saran, also prime minister’s special envoy on climate change and nuclear issues, asserted that New Delhi will not sign the CTBT unless the world moves “categorically towards nuclear disarmament in a credible time-frame”.

    Saran acknowledged that the CTBT is “an issue that has been seen as potentially a contentious one in our relations with the new US administration”.

    “India has been a consistent votary of a CTBT but did not sign the CTBT as it eventually emerged because it was not explicitly linked to the goal of nuclear disarmament,” Saran said at The Brookings Institution, a Washington think tank.

    But if “the world moves categorically towards nuclear disarmament in a credible time-frame, the Indo-US differences over the CTBT would probably recede into the background”, Saran said.
     
  16. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Nuclear issues — Face-off with Obama Administration

     
  17. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    India May Sign Nuclear Liability Accord After Polls, Saran Says

     
  18. johnee

    johnee Elite Member Elite Member

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    india should really stress on nuclear disarmament, may be we should propose a NDT(nuclear disarmament treaty) in UN, seconded by iran. so everytime, US talks about CTBT/NPT, we can talk about NDT.
     
  19. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Why to put more masala in kichadi. No body will take the first step status quo will remain
     
  20. johnee

    johnee Elite Member Elite Member

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    just to gain moral highground, you know. so, we would be the one shouting and they would be the ones hushing it up.
    our PM must 'insist' in every meet with obama that 'world needs nuclear disarmament', otherwise he will talk about CTBT/NPT. so shut his mouth before he even has chance to open it.
     

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