New Naval Technology

Discussion in 'Naval Warfare' started by asianobserve, Sep 10, 2019.

  1. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Post here all new naval developments.
     
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  3. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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  4. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    A not so new news.

    Navy Starting Work on New SSN(X) Nuclear Attack Submarine with long range wespons

    The U.S. Navy is starting early preparation work to design a new nuclear attack submarine to replace the Virginia-class boats (SSN-774) in the 2030s. The new attack boat would become operational in 2044 after the last Block VII Virginias are built.

    One of the areas Johnson has already indentified as critical for SSN(X) is integration with off-board systems. Vice Adm. Mike Connor, Commander of Submarine Force, Atlantic (COMSUBLANT), said that future submarine weapons for both the Virginia and the future SSN(X) would be networked extremely long-ranged weapons.


    Some of the concepts include a new prototype torpedo propulsion system from Pennsylvania State University — a torpedo could hit targets that could hit targets more than 200 nautical miles away.


    https://news.usni.org/2014/10/23/navy-starting-work-new-ssnx-nuclear-attack-submarine
     
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  5. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Behold The Navy's New Radar For Nimitz Class Carriers And Amphibious Assault Ships
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    SPY-6V2 is a very close relative of the Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) system, also known as SPY-6V1, being fielded aboard the new Arleigh Burke class Flight III destroyers. AMDR is made up of 37 individual Radar Modular Assemblies (RMAs) that are basically two foot by two foot active electronically scanned array radar 'blocks' that can be easily swapped in and out as needed. This modularity means that the system can also be scaled up or down for different applications with relative ease.



    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zo...z-class-carriers-and-amphibious-assault-ships


     
  6. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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  7. Angad Singh

    Angad Singh Regular Member

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    To cater to increased Chinese naval activity in the Indian Ocean, the Government of India has approved an expansion and upgrade plan for the Navy. Over the next ten years, the Navy is set to acquire 56 new ships, to include submarines, minesweepers and fleet ships. Some of these will be replacements for the ships presently held by the Indian Navy while the rest will be an addition to the naval fleet. The above is in addition to the 32 ships and submarines under construction or under contract to be built in private and public shipyards in India. Of the 56 new ships, there are six submarines that are being contracted. These are in addition to the Kalvari-class submarines that are being built by Mazagon Dock Limited (MDL), in collaboration with French company DCNS. Kalvari is the Indian Navy’s first indigenous Scorpene-class stealth submarine, the first of which is undergoing sea trials. Six of these submarines are being built under the much-delayed Project 75.

    https://saluteindia.org/defence-new...owitzer-indian-navy-expansion-plans-and-more/
     
  8. leanshots

    leanshots New Member

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    No doubt there'll be 'bugs' in the system. :D

    ---
    Contact me smartphone no.: +030484107358
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2019
  9. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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  10. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Kongsberg unveils Vanguard warship design that could ‘rock the market’

    [​IMG]
    Design work on the Vanguard platform was led by Norwegian maritime consultancy Salt Ship Design. (Kongsberg)

    OSLO, Norway — Are you a navy looking to spend less when buying and operating warships? Norwegian defense company Kongsberg reckons it may have the answer.

    Kongsberg has taken the wraps off a new multirole warship design that the company says extensively uses commercial systems and can be built in commercial yards for substantially less money and in less time than traditional warships.

    With warship procurement becoming eye-wateringly expensive, Kongsberg’s defense and aerospace arm is pitching its Vanguard design as a way to save money via a 50 percent life-cycle cost reduction.

    Vanguard will have what is effectively a plug-and-play capability, enabling the multipurpose vessel to pack containers — that meet this International Organization for Standardization’s guidelines — with equipment to swap missions as diverse as hydrographic survey to anti-submarine, area-denial and other roles in a matter of hours.

    Kongsberg doesn’t traditionally build or design warships. The Norweigian company is better known in the defense sector for pioneering the use of remote weapons for land vehicles and development of the surface-to-surface Joint Strike Missile for use on the F-35 fighter jet.


    Design work on the platform was led by Norwegian maritime consultancy Salt Ship Design. It’s the company’s first major military program, having previously focused on complex commercial ship design work in the offshore energy sector, among other markets.

    Kongsberg and Salt have been collaborating on the project for more than two years. Salt executives said conceptual work was more or less finished, and they are now engaged in initial design work.

    Vanguard has been fitted out with Kongsberg equipment like a commercial bridge system overlaid with military specifications. But company officials said the flexibility to install other systems to meet customer requirements is a key element of the program.

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    Baseline ship equipment is predominantly supplied by Kongsberg Defence Systems. Its sister operation, Kongsberg Maritime, is a major player in the commercial maritime sector and earlier this year acquired Britain’s Rolls-Royce Commercial Marine.

    Frank Tveiten , Kongsberg’s vice president of naval integrated defense systems, said Vanguard has sparked the interest of potential customers and shipyards.


    “We have tested it in the market with very positive reactions. The baseline warship fitted with Kongsberg systems and sensors is substantially cheaper than other warships. It’s going to rock the market a little bit,“ he said.

    Tveiten said the economies stretched beyond procurement with manning levels as low as 16-20 people, and a speed requirement that results in very low fuel consumption.

    Build time for a Vanguard in a commercial yard could be as little as two years, according to the Salt executives.

    Kongsberg executives said Vanguard would suit emerging navies as well as interest some larger navies looking to increase offshore patrol, corvette and frigate numbers without breaking the bank.

    Senior Norwegian naval officers at a Kongsberg briefing in Oslo on Sept. 26 said they are interested in the concept but were guarded about whether Vanguard could be a contender to replace the Navy’s Helge Ingstad frigate, which was written off after a collision with an oil tanker last year.


    Chief of the Navy Rear Adm. Nils-Andreas Stensones said there is a gradual move to the use of commercial systems onboard warships, and that Norway’s experience with Coast Guard vessels and other ships using similar systems had been positive.

    “We have had a very good experience when it comes to the Coast Guard over the last 30 years. Also, our new supply ship is built to civilian standards with some military adaptions, and the experience so far is good,” Stensones said. “We see that in many areas we can use civilian technology to great benefit. We see [the use of] commercial equipment sliding gradually to the more high-end applications, but how far [one[ can go with that we don’t know yet."

    “The cost of building military-specified platforms today is becoming prohibitively expensive. If you can reduce the cost of the platform, you can invest more in weapons and sensors. It’s finding the best balance,” he added. “Whether we will end up with this concept [Vanguard], I don’t know. The hardest part is the training. If you have a mission module onboard, you also need a trained crew — that may be the biggest challenge.

    https://www.defensenews.com/industr...rd-warship-design-that-could-rock-the-market/
     
  11. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    This Image Of A Naval Strike Missile Launch Shows A Key Tenet Of Stealth Design

    [​IMG]

    The Navy Strike Missile, which is a product of Norway's Kongsberg Defense and Aerospace, was designed with reduced radar cross-section in mind, and especially from the head-on aspect from which it will barrel towards its maritime target. The missile uses passive imaging infrared, not radar, to locate and attack its prey. As a result, it doesn't give away its presence by emitting RF radiation during its terminal phase of flight. It also isn't susceptible to 'soft kill' electronic warfare tactics like jamming. In addition, its small radar cross-section makes it hard to spot on radar as it skims low and fast over the waves.

    Generally speaking, warships depend on a missile's radar emissions and its radar signature to detect it and defend against it. Lacking one of these things entirely and manifesting the other in very limited quantities, you can imagine that the Naval Strike Missile is one diabolical and deadly anti-ship cruise missile. Oh, it also has a secondary land-attack capability, too.





    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zo...le-launch-shows-a-key-tenet-of-stealth-design
     
  12. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Another very nice video of the deadly Swedish cruise missile, also in USN service, known as Naval Strike Missile (NSM) pummeling an old warship:

     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2019
  13. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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  14. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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  15. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    A classified Pentagon maritime drone program is about to get its moment in the sun - Overlord Program
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    A rendering of the Sea Hunter unmanned surface ship developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. A separate program aimed at developing a lethal unmanned surface vessel is producing a nearly $3 billion program announced in the Navy's

    The Navy raised eyebrows in its budget rollout Tuesday when it requested $400 million for two large unmanned surface vessels to be purchased in 2020, with 10 total to be purchased across the five-year projection known as the future year defense program. But it was not immediately clear what exactly the Navy was buying two of, since no program of record exists for a large unmanned surface vessel (or LUSV).

    Navy officials now say the request is an outgrowth of SCO’s Project Overlord, which first surfaced in 2017 with a draft solicitation outlining a program that would take existing autonomy technologies and integrate them into large and medium unmanned surface vessels with some heady ambitions: an autonomous ship capable of carrying up to 40 tons of payloads, and operate in up to sea-state five independently for 90 days without a crew for maintenance, while following all rules of navigation and obstacle avoidance.

    Overlord

    The Overlord program from which the Navy hopes to derive its new large unmanned robot warship is the child of the Pentagon’s Strategic Capabilities Office, a workshop under the auspices of the Office of the Secretary of Defense that seeks to add funky new capabilities to existing gear and weapons.

    The office’s big headline-grabbers to date have been its work on drone swarms and converting the Navy’s SM-6 anti-air missile into a very long range ship killer.

    But its work on autonomous surface vehicles has been less front-and-center.

    According the 2017 draft plan, Overlord is seeking a ship that can do virtually everything a larger manned vessel can do – obey the international rules of the road for navigation, plan a route for a mission, communicate with other ships (manned or otherwise) in a task force – and do it with very little interaction with sailors once it gets underway.

    “The Overlord program will develop core autonomy, communications, and C2 components and field prototype USVs capable of being seamlessly operable with the fleet,” the draft says. "The Overlord program will have built in redundancy in all critical hardware and software systems. The program will involve integration and test of payloads for [electronic warfare], [anit-surface warfare], and [strike warfare].”

    https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2...rogram-is-about-to-get-its-moment-in-the-sun/

     
  16. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    US Navy starts second phase of Ghost Fleet Overlord programme

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    A Ghost Fleet Overlord test vessel sits pier-side following a capstone demonstration during the conclusion of Phase I of the programme in September. Credit: U.S. Navy/RELEASED.

    The US Navy Program Executive Office Unmanned and Small Combatants (PEO USC) has started the second phase of the Ghost Fleet Overlord programme.

    The programme will form the basis of the navy’s new classes of unmanned surface vessels (USVs).

    Under the second phase, the navy has awarded contract modifications to the two industry teams involved in the first phase of the Overlord programme.

    The first phase ended last month and involved converting two existing commercial fast supply vessels into USVs.

    Other focus areas of Phase I included autonomy system integration; hull, mechanical and electrical system reliability upgrades; and navigational autonomy.


    The navy said in a statement: “Phase I concluded in September with a successful capstone demonstration of both Overlord vessels executing interactions compliant with the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS).

    “Along with the reliability of systems tests, more than 600 hours of autonomy testing was successfully completed during Phase I, including several long-range autonomous transits in a complex navigational environment.”

    The second phase will use the same ships involved in Phase I. The industry teams will work on the integration of command and control systems and payloads.

    The service added that the new phase will involve more complex naval experimentation.

    Following the completion of Phase II in 2021, the navy will conduct further experimentation on the Overlord vessels.

    The navy will use experience from the Ghost Fleet Overlord programme to inform and accelerate its large and medium USV projects.

    Last month, the US Navy issued a request for proposals for the development of the large USV (LUSV). The conceptual design contracts for the LUSV are expected in 2020.

    https://www.naval-technology.com/news/us-navy-starts-second-phase-of-ghost-fleet-overlord-programme/
     
  17. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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  18. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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  19. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Navy Amphibious Warfare Ship USS Portland Spotted Heading To Sea With New Laser Turret

    The laser represents a large leap in power output over previous systems and is hardened to operate in the harsh maritime environment.

    [​IMG]

    The SSL-TM laser promises to be significantly more powerful than either of these previous systems, being in the 150-kilowatt class. The prototype laser developed under the MLD program was in the 15-kilowatt class, though Northrop Grumman did also demonstrate a system consisting of multiple lasers that created a single beam with a combined power of 105 kilowatts. The LaWS laser was in the 30-kilowatt class.

    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zo...-spotted-heading-to-sea-with-new-laser-turret
     
  20. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Here’s what you need to know about the US Navy’s new deadly (and expensive) attack subs

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    Here’s are the four things you need to know about the vessel:

    1. A bigger boat

    Most of Block V is going to be bigger (much bigger) than its older sisters in the class. Of the nine — potentially 10 — boats in the class, eight of them will have 84-foot sections plugged into the hull that will include four large-diameter tubes rated for seven Tomahawks each. In addition to the 12 in the bow, that means each Block V will have the capacity for 40 cruise missiles.

    But it’s not just the traditional Tomahawk land-attack missiles that will be stuffed in the payload module. Submariners are envisioning a whole range of missions for the big tubes, such as:

    • Deploying large-diameter unmanned undersea vehicles for various missions.
    • Launching hypersonic prompt-strike missiles.
    • Launching Tomahawk’s new maritime strike iteration against ships in addition to the existing Harpoon missile.
    • Torpedoes.
    • Really anything they can get to fit in there that could benefit from being deployed off a submarine.
    [​IMG]A rendered image of the Virginia Block V attack submarine, destined to change the submarine community. (Courtesy of General Dynamics)

    2. Responsibilities galore

    Because the Navy designed a lot of versatility in the platform, the Block V will act as a Swiss Army knife for undersea warfare, taking on a range of missions that traditionally have gone to the retiring guided-missile submarines, or SSGNs, said Bryan Clark, a retired submarine officer and analyst for the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

    That’s going to require a cultural change inside the submarine community, Clark said.

    “The Block V will be a marked difference in terms of the concept of operations for a multimission ship,” he said. “For strike, that mission has largely been sent off to SSGNs: They’ve focused on Tomahawk missions and SEAL delivery; the rest of the attack submarines have focused on focused on traditional intelligence-gathering missions.

    “With the introduction of Block V, those missions are going to expand to a larger percentage of the force.”

    Much of that is already part of submariner training, but the emphasis will have to be increased, Clark predicted.

    “Submariners were always trained on Tomahawk missions, anti-ship missions and swimmer delivery: Those are all things you train for in case you have to do them,” he said. “But with the advent of Block V, those missions are going to have to be a bigger part of submariner training. And with [the] Tomahawk maritime strike missile coming into the fleet, they are going have an anti-ship mission alongside the older [Los Angeles-class] 688s having the torpedo-tube launched harpoon.

    “So in a lot of ways the submarine community is going back in [the] direction it was during the Cold War — it was a much more expansive mission then back then. Then It narrowed with the introduction of the SSGN. Now its set to expand again.”

    3. Quiet

    The Block V incorporates what they Navy calls an acoustic superiority program, which is basically a comprehensive effort to both improve listening capabilities to find other ships and submarines as well as make the submarine much quieter in the water.

    The improvements include a new vertical array, coatings and machinery-quieting technology throughout the boat.

    [​IMG]Sailors assigned to the Virginia-class attack submarine Indiana secure mooring lines to the sub. (MC2 Sonja Wickard/U.S. Navy)

    4. It’s expensive as hell

    As one might expect for a big multimission attack submarine, the Virginia Block V is mind-bogglingly expensive. With a total value of the program sitting at $35 billion when governmen- furnished equipment is added, each sub will cost in excess of $3.5 billion per hull, should the Navy buy all 10 of the Block Vs.

    The Navy has recognized that with the proliferation of long-range anti-ship missiles, the service will need to put more missiles than ever in the air to strike launchers inland and to defend major assets such as aircraft carriers from attack.

    https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2...s-deadly-and-expensive-new-attack-submarines/
     
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  21. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Lockheed Martin to equip future Spanish frigates with latest radars

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    Pentagon’s No.1 weapons supplier Lockheed Martin Corp, announced on Thursday that it recently signed a contract with Navantia to equip five new F-110 multimission frigates and their land-based test site (Centro de Integración de Sistemas en Tierra or CIST) – with Lockheed Martin’s first naval installation of its solid state S-band radar.

    Recently designated by the U.S. Government as AN/SPY-7(V)1, this technology is derived from current radar programs and significant Lockheed Martin investment. Variants of the SPY-7 radar will also be utilized on programs with Japan’s Aegis Ashore, the Royal Canadian Navy for the Canadian Surface Combatant program and the U.S. Government.

    https://defence-blog.com/news/lockh...ture-spanish-frigates-with-latest-radars.html
     

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